9

I am working with multidimensional array both on R and MATLAB, these arrays have five dimensions (total of 14.5M of elements). I have to remove a dimension applying an arithmetic mean on it and I discovered an amazing difference of performances using the two softwares.

MATLAB:

>> a = rand([144  73  10   6  23]);
>> tic; b = mean(a,3); toc
Elapsed time is 0.014454 seconds.

R:

> a = array(data = runif(144*73*6*23*10), dim = c(144,73,10,6,23))
> start <- Sys.time (); b = apply(a, c(1,2,4,5), mean); Sys.time () - start
Time difference of 1.229083 mins

I know that apply function is slow because is something like a general purpose function, but I don't know how to deal with this problem because this difference of performances is really a big limit for me. I tried to search for a generalization of colMeans/rowMeans functions but I didn't succeed.

EDIT I'll show a little sample matrix:

> dim(a)
[1] 2 4 3
> dput(aa)
structure(c(7, 8, 5, 8, 10, 11, 9, 9, 6, 12, 9, 10, 12, 10, 14, 
12, 7, 9, 8, 10, 10, 9, 8, 6), .Dim = c(2L, 4L, 3L))
a_mean = apply(a, c(2,3), mean)
> a_mean
     [,1] [,2] [,3]
[1,]  7.5  9.0  8.0
[2,]  6.5  9.5  9.0
[3,] 10.5 11.0  9.5
[4,]  9.0 13.0  7.0

EDIT (2):

I discovered that applying sum function and then dividing by the size of the removed dimension is definitely faster:

> start <- Sys.time (); aaout = apply(aa, c(1,2,4,5), sum); Sys.time () - start
Time difference of 5.528063 secs
5

mean is particularly slow because of S3 method dispatch. This is faster:

set.seed(42)
a = array(data = runif(144*73*6*23*10), dim = c(144,73,10,6,23))

system.time({b = apply(a, c(1,2,4,5), mean.default)})
# user  system elapsed 
#16.80    0.03   16.94

If you don't need to handle NAs you can use the internal function:

system.time({b1 = apply(a, c(1,2,4,5),  function(x) .Internal(mean(x)))})
# user  system elapsed 
# 6.80    0.04    6.86

For comparison:

system.time({b2 = apply(a, c(1,2,4,5),  function(x) sum(x)/length(x))})
# user  system elapsed 
# 9.05    0.01    9.08 

system.time({b3 = apply(a, c(1,2,4,5),  sum)
             b3 = b3/dim(a)[[3]]})
# user  system elapsed 
# 7.44    0.03    7.47

(Note that all timings are only approximate. Proper benchmarking would require running this repreatedly, e.g., using one of the bechmarking packages. But I'm not patient enough for that right now.)

It might be possible to speed this up with an Rcpp implementation.

  • 1
    See here for more information. – Simon O'Hanlon Sep 5 '13 at 9:22
  • I also tried library(data.table); system.time({b3 = apply(a, c(1,2,4,5), function(x) .External("Cfastmean", x, FALSE))}), but it wasn't faster. – Roland Sep 5 '13 at 9:26
  • Thank you, you have definitely helped me! I also learnt something really interesting about R internal mechanisms... – Matteo De Felice Sep 5 '13 at 10:04
22

In R, apply is not the right tool for the task. If you had a matrix and needed the row or column means, you would use the much much faster, vectorized rowMeans and colMeans. You can still use these for a multi-dimensional array but you need to be a little creative:

Assuming your array has n dimensions, and you want to compute means along dimension i:

  1. use aperm to move the dimension i to the last position n
  2. use rowMeans with dims = n - 1

Similarly, you could:

  1. use aperm to move the dimension i to the first position
  2. use colMeans with dims = 1

a <- array(data = runif(144*73*6*23*10), dim = c(144,73,10,6,23))

means.along <- function(a, i) {
  n <- length(dim(a))
  b <- aperm(a, c(seq_len(n)[-i], i))
  rowMeans(b, dims = n - 1)
}

system.time(z1 <- apply(a, c(1,2,4,5), mean))
#    user  system elapsed 
#  25.132   0.109  25.239 
system.time(z2 <- means.along(a, 3))
#    user  system elapsed 
#   0.283   0.007   0.289 

identical(z1, z2)
# [1] TRUE
  • Exactly. Always use vectorized funcs over loops or *apply whenever possible. – Carl Witthoft Sep 5 '13 at 11:31
  • This should definitely be the accepted answer. +1 for a great explanation of the generalised case. I was looking aperm but just could not get it right. Thanks! – Simon O'Hanlon Sep 5 '13 at 12:25
  • For completeness' sake, rowMeans does not use the same algorithm mean uses; the first is naive single-pass accumulate and divide; the latter has a second pass to improve numerical stability. – Ferdinand.kraft Sep 5 '13 at 19:00
  • Can you explain more why you need aperm? I just found that all(colMeans(a, dims=1) == means.along(a,1)) is true. I.e. colMeans() by itself did what I needed (on a 3D array). Does means.along() handle cases that colMeans() or rowMeans() would not be able to by themselves? – Darren Cook Aug 21 '16 at 18:21
  • 1
    @DarrenCook. While doing their summation work, colMeans will remove the first n dimensions of an array whereas rowMeans will remove the last n dimensions of an array (where you have control over the value of n via the dims argument). So by themselves, you see how they are not capable of handling OP's case where he wants to remove the 3rd dimension of a 5d array. Hence the need for aperm to move that 3rd dimension either in 1st position (so that colMeans can be used) or in 5th position (so that roMeans can be used). – flodel Aug 21 '16 at 19:29

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