Does gcc completely conform to the inline model specified in C99 standard?

I've browsed some info about this problem. But I can't understand why the inline func must be specified with "extern" or "static".

In .c file, calling an inline function defined in the same translation unit causes an error. What's the reason of compiler behaviour?

I found a post Is “inline” without “static” or “extern” ever useful in C99?

What does this mean?

If a call to some function func with external linkage occurs where an inline definition is visible, the behavior is the same as if the call were made to another function, say __func, with internal linkage.

The inline semantic in C99 is a little bit confusing I have to admit. The inline quantifier allows you to define alternative definitions of a function.

If a function is defined everywhere as just inline in both declarations and definition then this definition is valid only in the local translation unit. In the C99 standard this definition is very vague, but in practice most compilers implement this in a similar sense to static inline. Essentially just inline overwrites any other function with the same name in any other linking unit. Thus if you declare a function as just inline in a header the compiler will expect to find a definition of it in the same compilation unit and will give you an error later if it doesn't.

Now if a function is to be both inlineable and available in other translation units then it needs to be defined as extern in the header declaration. Then the compiler won't look for it just in the current compilation unit.

static inline is by far the most portable definition at the moment and is constrained to the current translation unit. This is often found in headers together with the actual function definition.

inline function belong in the header, such that all compilation units see the code.

If the code can't be inlined for whatever reason, the final executable has to have one version of the function to which it may link. This you'd have to "instantiate" in just one compilation unit (.c file) with something like

extern inline void toto(int bla);

which forces a symbol to be included in that unit.

You may find more about that here

You have to think about how code gets linked. First the source code is compiled to object files. These object files just contain the binary code of each function which are found by indexing the name of the function (or the mangled name in c++). The object files contain NO information about whether the function is to be inlined or not. So this information must be put into the header file which is used in combination with the object file during the linking process. By using static in front of inline in your .c file, you are making that function visible to any other function that uses that static inline function PRIOR to the compiling process. But once these functions are compiled into an object file, they cannot 'inlined' with other functions from other object files.

So by just including the inline keyword in your header definitions (.h file) instead of your source file (.c), you can 'inline' functions from one object file inside other functions from another object file in the linking process.

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