21

I have a small example of a nested flexbox setup: http://jsfiddle.net/ThomasSpiessens/MUrPj/12/

<div class="box fullSize">
    <div class="boxHeader">HEADER</div>
    <div class="boxContent">
        <div class="box fullSize">
            <div class="boxHeader moregreen">INNER HEADER</div>
            <div class="boxContent red">CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT</div>
            <div class="boxFooter moreblue">INNER FOOTER</div>
        </div>
    </div>
    <div class="boxFooter">FOOTER</div>
</div>

In this example the following applies:

  • CSS 'box' classes use flexbox properties on which only the boxContent is told to grow. For specific CSS properties and values, please check the fiddle.
  • 'fullSize' just sets both width and height to 100%.

When you check this fiddle with Firefox and Chrome you get different results. In Firefox it does what I would suppose it has to do, which is stretching the inner .boxContent. In Chrome however, the inner .boxContent doesn't get stretched.

Would anyone have an idea how to make the content stretch in Chrome as well ? perhaps a specific webkit property that is missing ?

19

Unless you need that extra div, remove it. There is sometimes a difference between the height of an element and its length along the main axis (column orientation), which is causing some confusion here. Basically, it looks like it is taller than the browser believes it to be, which is why height: 100% doesn't work like you expect (I'm not certain which behavior is correct in this instance).

For whatever reason, promoting the element to a flex container works.

http://jsfiddle.net/MUrPj/14/

<div class="box fullSize">
    <div class="boxHeader">HEADER</div>
    <div class="boxContent box">
        <div class="boxHeader moregreen">INNER HEADER</div>
        <div class="boxContent red">CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT CONTENT</div>
        <div class="boxFooter moreblue">INNER FOOTER</div>
    </div>
    <div class="boxFooter">FOOTER</div>
</div>
  • 2
    This worked for me. Couldn't get the wrapper div to stretch under any circumstances. Got rid of it and worked fine. Kind of annoying. – Obie Sep 9 '14 at 18:37
13

This question has been linked for a specific problem: How to make nested elements in a flex box fill the whole height? The short answer is:

Use display:flex on the child and avoid height:100%. Here is a simplified example on codepen.

CourtDemone explained it well (more here):

According to the flexbox spec, an align-self:stretch value (the default for a flex'd element) changes only the used value of an element's cross-size property (in this case, height). Percentages however are calculated from the specified value of the parent's cross-size property, not it's used value.

  • it worked for me, div container (flex) had rows, rows had two elements/cells. first elem is fixed width, second was to fill the whatever remaining width. display:flex on row did the magic. – DavChana May 18 '18 at 17:24
3

I've found a solution without removing the extra-div.

You need to make boxContent relative positioned and its containing box absolute.

With attaching an extra css class to the inner div:

<div class="boxContent">
    <div class="box fullSize innerBox">

and following css:

.boxContent {
  ...
    position: relative;
}
.innerBox{
    position: absolute;
    top: 0px;
    bottom: 0px;
}

here's the updated jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/MUrPj/223/

This question is pretty old, but this might be helpful for future visitors

  • Thanx man, the best solution in my case, where nested elements must be inline-blocks – Codeartist Mar 17 '16 at 16:42

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