This question already has an answer here:

Recently I noticed a behavior difference between Firefox and other browsers for the following javascript code:

var condition = true;
A();

function A() {

    var x=0;

    for(var i=0; i<10; i++) {
        if(condition) {
            ++x;
            B();
        }

        function B() {
                console.log("B function. x = "+x);
        }
    }
}

Chrome, Opera, IE output:

B function. x = 1
B function. x = 2 
B function. x = 3
B function. x = 4
B function. x = 5
B function. x = 6
B function. x = 7
B function. x = 8
B function. x = 9
B function. x = 10

Firefox output:

ReferenceError: B is not defined

However, there are no complaints from Firefox and gives out the same result as other browsers, if I put the definition of function B before the call, like this:

for(var i=0; i<10; i++) {

        function B() {
                console.log("B function. x = "+x);
        }

        if(condition) {
            ++x;
            B();
        }
    }

Based on this quote from Mozilla developer site:

Functions must be in scope when they are called, but the function declaration can be below the call

I understand the call, A() works. But I am not clear on why there is a difference in behavior between Firefox and others in calling B(), when the call is before definition.

While trying to narrow down the cause, I read about function hoisting here, which says Firefox doesnt do hoisting when inside an if block, but the definition was never inside the if statement in my case, so Im confused.

marked as duplicate by Bergi, Boris Zbarsky, apsillers, vorrtex, beatgammit Mar 3 '14 at 17:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    Placing a function declaration in a block (i.e., not in top-level code in a function or global code) is not legal ECMAScript, and browsers that allow it (i.e., all of them) are providing a custom extension of the language specification. You are observing two different custom extensions of the language. The statement "Firefox doesnt do hoisting when inside an if block" is a little misleading: Firefox doesn't do hoisting in any block, including for. – apsillers Sep 5 '13 at 16:24
  • @apsillers - So is it safe to assume this issue is solely because Firefox doesnt do hoisting inside any block? – Razor Sep 5 '13 at 17:25
  • From the code you have posted here, yes, lack of hoisting for function declarations in blocks would account for the observed behavior perfectly. – apsillers Sep 5 '13 at 17:27

Firefox does not hoist function declarations outside of for blocks either. ECMA standard says it's okay. The documentation you linked to is not applicable only to if blocks, but for blocks as well.

  • 1
    You've got a couple of statements in reverse: you mean in-side, and the ECMAScript spec does not allow function declarations inside blocks. – bfavaretto Sep 5 '13 at 16:27
  • "Firefox does not hoist function declarations [to] outside of for blocks [from inside the block]. ECMA standard says it's okay [that this behavior happens]." I don't think I was wrong. I just wasn't clear. – Joe Frambach Sep 5 '13 at 17:28

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