according to http://developer.android.com/training/multiscreen/screendensities.html

The following scale factors are mentioned

xhdpi: 2.0 hdpi: 1.5 mdpi: 1.0 (baseline) ldpi: 0.75

I was wondering what the scale factor would be for xxhdpi?

  • Does it even support xxhdpi? Not like Google to miss something out of the docs – musefan Sep 6 '13 at 10:10
  • @musefan , android sdk creates a folder automatically since the start of this year atleast , called drawable-xxhdpi . Also S4 , HTC ONE , and Xperia Z are xxhdpi . I have seen them take resources from the xxhdpi bucket . they are way above the xhdpi (240) level – Muhammad Ahmed AbuTalib Sep 6 '13 at 10:13
  • Fair enough then – musefan Sep 6 '13 at 10:14
  • see my answer here too – mehrdad khosravi Jul 27 '16 at 7:10
up vote 261 down vote accepted

In android.util.DisplayMetrics, you can see that scaling factor is 0.00625:

/**
 * Scaling factor to convert a density in DPI units to the density scale.
 * @hide
 */
public static final float DENSITY_DEFAULT_SCALE = 1.0f / DENSITY_DEFAULT;

Where as DENSITY_DEFAULT is 160 --> scaling factor = 1.0f / 160 = 0.00625.

sizeScale = DENSITY_DEFAULT_SCALE * DENSITY_DPI

From this:

  • ldpi = 0.00625 * 120 -> 0.75
  • mdpi = 0.00625 * 160 -> 1.0
  • hdpi = 0.00625 * 240 -> 1.5
  • xhdpi = 0.00625 * 320 -> 2.0
  • xxhdpi = 0.00625 * 480 -> 3.0
  • xxxhdpi = 0.00625 * 640 -> 4.0

Not exactly a rocket science, but hope this will be useful for someone :)

  • 3
    and tvdpi -> 1.3312501 (for example: plus.google.com/105051985738280261832/posts/6eWwQvFGLV8) – Vitaly Zinchenko Oct 20 '15 at 17:32
  • 2
    I wonder if this is still true; the Google Device Metrics site lists both 3.5 and 4.0 scaling for xxxhdpi: design.google.com/devices. I'm not sure how to resolve that inconsistency... – lilbyrdie Apr 25 '16 at 15:10
  • 4
    @lilbyrdie: it does still hold. See the comment for DENSITY_560 in android.util.DisplayMetrics – ozbek Apr 26 '16 at 5:13
  • 1
    @ozbek: So even though the devices might be labelled xxxhdpi, internally they aren't? That also implies all graphics are scaled for them? That doesn't sound very efficient. I also see that there are four other intermediate densities... In any case, thanks for the info. That's exactly what I was looking for. – lilbyrdie Apr 27 '16 at 18:57
  • 2
    @ozbek Really? That's insane. Perhaps we shouldn't be surprised. It's buried so deep in the documentation that even the Google developers themselves probably don't know it :) – the_new_mr May 3 '17 at 17:44

If you look at Metrics and Grids you'll see that xxhdpi is 480 dpi which is 3 times that of the baseline (mdpi @ 1.0). In other words the scale factor for xxhdpi is 3.0

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