38

I'm looking for a way to perform pointer operations in C# or .NET in particular.

I want to do something very simple

Having a pointer IntPtr I want to get IntPtr object which points to 2 bytes ahead.

I read some post that the foolowing snippet will work...

IntPtr ptr = new IntPtr(oldptr.ToInt32() + 2);

But I have doubts whether this statement is also valid for 64-bit machine (since addressing is in 64-bits there)..

I found this elegant method to add offset, but unfortunately is in .NET 4.0 only http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.intptr.add%28VS.100%29.aspx

  • A byte is still a byte on a 64-bit-machine. So, it will still skip two bytes forward. – Dan Byström Dec 8 '09 at 11:07
  • 1
    @dan: yes, but the address of the byte can be outside the 32-bit range! Marcin is correct that this is not valid for 64-bit. – Lucero Dec 8 '09 at 12:09
41

I suggest you to use ToInt64() and long to perform your computation. This way you will avoid problem on 64 bits version of the .NET framework.

IntPtr ptr = new IntPtr(oldptr.ToInt64() + 2);

This add a bit of overhead on 32 bits system, but it is safer.

| improve this answer | |
48

In .net 4 static Add() and Subtract() methods have been added.

IntPtr ptr = IntPtr.Add(oldPtr, 2);

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.intptr.add.aspx

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  • 3
    Whyever this is static. Sorry, I just destroyed your perfect score of 1000 with upvoting this answer ;/ – Ray Oct 1 '14 at 15:27
9

For pointer arithmetic in C# you should use proper pointers inside an unsafe context:

class PointerArithmetic
{
    unsafe static void Main() 
    {
        int* memory = stackalloc int[30];
        long* difference;
        int* p1 = &memory[4];
        int* p2 = &memory[10];

        difference = (long*)(p2 - p1);

        System.Console.WriteLine("The difference is: {0}", (long)difference);
    }
}

The IntPtr type is for passing around handles or pointers and also for marshalling to languages that support pointers. But it's not for pointer arithmetic.

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  • 1
    +1 for real pointer arithmetic instead of abusing the integer ALUs for performing address calculations. – Frank Apr 24 '10 at 18:02
  • 6
    Now that Microsoft in .NET 4 has introduced IntPtr.Add which returns "A new pointer that reflects the addition of offset to pointer", this makes IntPtr convenient for pointer arithmetic, and seems to indicate that Microsoft expects it to be used for that. – Spike0xff Dec 31 '13 at 19:44
  • There are restrictions to using unsafe code - hence why the /unsafe flag is required during compilation. It's best to avoid it, if possible. Also worth noting that the ALU is used to compute addresses, no matter what method you use. I don't see how it's being "abused" through manual calculations. – Robear Nov 10 '18 at 19:34
9

I found that I can avoid pointer operations by using Marshal.ReadByte(), Marshal.ReadInt16() etc. methods. This group of methods allow to specify offset in releation to the IntPtr...

| improve this answer | |
7
public static class IntPtrExtensions
{
    #region Methods: Arithmetics
    public static IntPtr Decrement(this IntPtr pointer, Int32 value)
    {
        return Increment(pointer, -value);
    }

    public static IntPtr Decrement(this IntPtr pointer, Int64 value)
    {
        return Increment(pointer, -value);
    }

    public static IntPtr Decrement(this IntPtr pointer, IntPtr value)
    {
        switch (IntPtr.Size)
        {
            case sizeof(Int32):
                return (new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt32() - value.ToInt32()));

            default:
                return (new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt64() - value.ToInt64()));
        }
    }

    public static IntPtr Increment(this IntPtr pointer, Int32 value)
    {
        unchecked
        {
            switch (IntPtr.Size)
            {
                case sizeof(Int32):
                    return (new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt32() + value));

                default:
                    return (new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt64() + value));
            }
        }
    }

    public static IntPtr Increment(this IntPtr pointer, Int64 value)
    {
        unchecked
        {
            switch (IntPtr.Size)
            {
                case sizeof(Int32):
                    return (new IntPtr((Int32)(pointer.ToInt32() + value)));

                default:
                    return (new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt64() + value));
            }
        }
    }

    public static IntPtr Increment(this IntPtr pointer, IntPtr value)
    {
        unchecked
        {
            switch (IntPtr.Size)
            {
                case sizeof(int):
                    return new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt32() + value.ToInt32());
                default:
                    return new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt64() + value.ToInt64());
            }
        }
    }
    #endregion

    #region Methods: Comparison
    public static Int32 CompareTo(this IntPtr left, Int32 right)
    {
        return left.CompareTo((UInt32)right);
    }

    public static Int32 CompareTo(this IntPtr left, IntPtr right)
    {
        if (left.ToUInt64() > right.ToUInt64())
            return 1;

        if (left.ToUInt64() < right.ToUInt64())
            return -1;

        return 0;
    }

    public static Int32 CompareTo(this IntPtr left, UInt32 right)
    {
        if (left.ToUInt64() > right)
            return 1;

        if (left.ToUInt64() < right)
            return -1;

        return 0;
    }
    #endregion

    #region Methods: Conversion
    public unsafe static UInt32 ToUInt32(this IntPtr pointer)
    {
        return (UInt32)((void*)pointer);
    }

    public unsafe static UInt64 ToUInt64(this IntPtr pointer)
    {
        return (UInt64)((void*)pointer);
    }
    #endregion

    #region Methods: Equality
    public static Boolean Equals(this IntPtr pointer, Int32 value)
    {
        return (pointer.ToInt32() == value);
    }

    public static Boolean Equals(this IntPtr pointer, Int64 value)
    {
        return (pointer.ToInt64() == value);
    }

    public static Boolean Equals(this IntPtr left, IntPtr ptr2)
    {
        return (left == ptr2);
    }

    public static Boolean Equals(this IntPtr pointer, UInt32 value)
    {
        return (pointer.ToUInt32() == value);
    }

    public static Boolean Equals(this IntPtr pointer, UInt64 value)
    {
        return (pointer.ToUInt64() == value);
    }

    public static Boolean GreaterThanOrEqualTo(this IntPtr left, IntPtr right)
    {
        return (left.CompareTo(right) >= 0);
    }

    public static Boolean LessThanOrEqualTo(this IntPtr left, IntPtr right)
    {
        return (left.CompareTo(right) <= 0);
    }
    #endregion

    #region Methods: Logic
    public static IntPtr And(this IntPtr pointer, IntPtr value)
    {
        switch (IntPtr.Size)
        {
            case sizeof(Int32):
                return (new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt32() & value.ToInt32()));

            default:
                return (new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt64() & value.ToInt64()));
        }
    }

    public static IntPtr Not(this IntPtr pointer)
    {
        switch (IntPtr.Size)
        {
            case sizeof(Int32):
                return (new IntPtr(~pointer.ToInt32()));

            default:
                return (new IntPtr(~pointer.ToInt64()));
        }
    }

    public static IntPtr Or(this IntPtr pointer, IntPtr value)
    {
        switch (IntPtr.Size)
        {
            case sizeof(Int32):
                return (new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt32() | value.ToInt32()));

            default:
                return (new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt64() | value.ToInt64()));
        }
    }

    public static IntPtr Xor(this IntPtr pointer, IntPtr value)
    {
        switch (IntPtr.Size)
        {
            case sizeof(Int32):
                return (new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt32() ^ value.ToInt32()));

            default:
                return (new IntPtr(pointer.ToInt64() ^ value.ToInt64()));
        }
    }
    #endregion
}
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  • 1
    How is this not the best answer... Perhaps add some commentary, but the code speaks for itself... – DeeJayh Oct 9 '17 at 5:20
2

You can use a extension method:

public static IntPtrExtensions {
    public static IntPtr Add( this IntPtr ptr, int offSet ) {
        IntPtr ret = new IntPtr( ptr.ToInt64() + offSet );
        return ret;
    }
}
// ... somewhere else ...
IntPtr pointer = GetHandle().Add( 15 );
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-1

From MSDN: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/system.intptr?view=netcore-3.1

"The IntPtr type is designed to be an integer whose size is platform-specific. That is, an instance of this type is expected to be 32-bits on 32-bit hardware and operating systems, and 64-bits on 64-bit hardware and operating systems."

        // Summary:
        //     Gets the size of this instance.
        //
        // Returns:
        //     The size of a pointer or handle in this process, measured in bytes. The value
        //     of this property is 4 in a 32-bit process, and 8 in a 64-bit process. You can
        //     define the process type by setting the /platform switch when you compile your
        //     code with the C# and Visual Basic compilers.
        public static int Size { get; }

So if the current code is running in the owning process's context, then the type IntPtr directly inherits the pointer size of the owning process and IntPtr.Size property should return size of pointer in the owning process.

Since all the above statement are true, we can simply use basic pointer arithmetic

offset = index*IntPtr.Size

NOTE: Only thing need to be concerned is to understand process/application target platform and the code which is being used. Ex: Incase your code needs to interact with both x86 and x64 processes acting like a hook then additional safety needs to be adhered else if it was just either one of them, then use plain C style pointer arithmetic

Again from MSDN:

static void ReadWriteIntPtr()
{
    // Allocate unmanaged memory. 
    int elementSize = Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(IntPtr));
    IntPtr unmanagedArray = Marshal.AllocHGlobal(10 * elementSize);

    // Set the 10 elements of the C-style unmanagedArray
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        Marshal.WriteIntPtr(unmanagedArray, i * elementSize, ((IntPtr)(i + 1)));
    }
    Console.WriteLine("Unmanaged memory written.");

    Console.WriteLine("Reading unmanaged memory:");
    // Print the 10 elements of the C-style unmanagedArray
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(Marshal.ReadIntPtr(unmanagedArray, i * elementSize));
    }

    Marshal.FreeHGlobal(unmanagedArray);

    Console.WriteLine("Done. Press Enter to continue.");
    Console.ReadLine();
}
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