-1

I am trying to make this IF statement to work:

" . ($currentpage == '/adver.php' ? 'active' : '' || $currentpage == 'editad.php' ? 'active' : '' ) . "

What I want to do, is that if the $currentpage is /adver.php or /editad.php, then "active" should be printed out.

The above doesn't work. How can I make the IF statement to function correct?

  • Please do NOT abuse the ternary like that. You're probably running into all kinds of bad results because || has a higher precedence than : and ?. – Marc B Sep 6 '13 at 18:23
0

If you insist on using the if shorthand, you can try something like:

" . ($currentpage == '/adver.php' ? 'active' : ($currentpage == 'editad.php' ? 'active' : '')) . "

Alternatively, you could something like:

" . (in_array($currentpage, array('/adver.php', 'editad.php')) ? 'active' : '') . "
  • When I use the ternary php code you've suggested, the only thing that is outputted is "active". Just "active" written in plain text. The HTML codes gets disabled. – oliverbj Sep 6 '13 at 18:35
3

Use basename() with $_SERVER['PHP_SELF'] to get the current script file name and than compare

if(basename($_SERVER['PHP_SELF']) == 'adver.php' || basename($_SERVER['PHP_SELF']) == 'editad.php') {
   echo 'class="active"'; //Whatever you want to echo
}

You can simply create a function(I often use) to get the script file name like

function script_name() {
   return basename($_SERVER['PHP_SELF']);
}

Now you can use something like

(script_name() == 'index.php') ? '' : '';

When I use this to echo out the active page I often use something like

function is_active($script_name) {
   if(basename($_SERVER['PHP_SELF']) == $script_name) {
      return 'class="active"';
   }
}

Now you can simply use the above function say in your menu like

<a href="index.php" <?php echo is_active('index.php'); ?>>
  • 1
    I think this is a more elegant way to write it :) – Sebastian Neira Sep 6 '13 at 18:20
  • Why negative vote? – Mr. Alien Sep 6 '13 at 18:23
  • 1
    Were you negative voted? Damn, this is such an elegant solution! I'll upvote you, as these solutions should be the ones being used. – Sebastian Neira Sep 6 '13 at 18:27
  • @Sikian thank you for your sportsmanship, I don't know whether is THE elegant way, but I just contributed a decent solution... – Mr. Alien Sep 6 '13 at 18:28
  • 1
    Yes, this is perhaps more elegant. I'd recommend adding the active part in your question :-) – Amal Murali Sep 6 '13 at 18:32
2

I believe you're using the ternary operator incorrectly.

You may want to try the following code:

($currentpage == '/adver.php' || $currentpage == 'editad.php') ? 'active' : ''  

Remember that the syntax of the ternary operator is the following:

(comparison) ? (if true) : (if false)

Therefore, the full comparison should go at the beginning. Anyway, consider using a normal if/else when possible, as ternary operators might be confusing both for the writer and the reader (and furthermore, you don't really need the else in this case).

EDIT: I recommend using Mr. Alien's solution.

  • When I use the ternary php code you've suggested, the only thing that is outputted is "active". Just "active" written in plain text. The HTML codes gets disabled. – oliverbj Sep 6 '13 at 18:34
  • have you tried using echo? – Sebastian Neira Sep 6 '13 at 18:41
1
if($currentpage == "adver.php" || $currentpage == "editad.php") {
    echo "Active";
}
0

There is a mistake to use '(' and ')'

Your should use like this

" . ($currentpage == '/adver.php') ? 'active' : '' || ($currentpage == 'editad.php') ? 'active' : ''  . "

instead of

" . ($currentpage == '/adver.php' ? 'active' : '' || $currentpage == 'editad.php' ? 'active' : '')  . "

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