101

Unless I am missing an obvious built-in method, what is the quickest way to get the nth occurrence of a string within a string?

I realize that I could loop the IndexOf method by updating its start index on each iteration of the loop. But doing it this way seems wasteful to me.

  • I would use a regular expressions for that then you have to optimal way of matching the string within the string. This in one of the beautiful DSLs we all should use when possible. An example in VB.net the code is almost the same in C#. – bovium Oct 9 '08 at 11:09
  • 2
    I would place good money on the regular expressions version being significantly harder to get right than "keep looping and doing simple String.IndexOf". Regular expressions have their place, but shouldn't be used when simpler alternatives exist. – Jon Skeet Oct 9 '08 at 12:06
  • Similar: stackoverflow.com/a/9908392/1305911 – JNF Oct 24 '12 at 10:58

10 Answers 10

52

That's basically what you need to do - or at least, it's the easiest solution. All you'd be "wasting" is the cost of n method invocations - you won't actually be checking any case twice, if you think about it. (IndexOf will return as soon as it finds the match, and you'll keep going from where it left off.)

  • 2
    I suppose your right, it does seem like there should be a built in method though, i'm sure it's a commmon occurrence. – PeteT Oct 9 '08 at 10:48
  • 4
    Really? I can't remember ever having to do it in about 13 years of Java and C# development. That doesn't mean I've really never had to do it - but just not often enough to remember. – Jon Skeet Oct 9 '08 at 11:01
  • Speaking of Java, we have StringUtils.ordinalIndexOf(). C# with all the Linq and other wonderful features, just doesn't have a built-in support for this. And yes it is very imperative to have its support if you are dealing with parsers and tokenizers. – Annie Mar 21 '14 at 10:22
  • 3
    @Annie: You say "we have" - do you mean in Apache Commons? If so, you can write your own third party library for .NET just as easily as you can for Java... so it's not like that's something the Java standard library has that .NET doesn't. And of course in C# you can add it as an extension method on string :) – Jon Skeet Mar 21 '14 at 10:24
108

You really could use the regular expression /((s).*?){n}/ to search for n-th occurrence of substring s.

In C# it might look like this:

public static class StringExtender
{
    public static int NthIndexOf(this string target, string value, int n)
    {
        Match m = Regex.Match(target, "((" + Regex.Escape(value) + ").*?){" + n + "}");

        if (m.Success)
            return m.Groups[2].Captures[n - 1].Index;
        else
            return -1;
    }
}

Note: I have added Regex.Escape to original solution to allow searching characters which have special meaning to regex engine.

  • 2
    should you be escaping the value? In my case I was looking for a dot msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… – russau Jun 6 '11 at 6:11
  • 3
    This Regex does not work if the target string contains linebreaks. Could you fix it? Thanks. – Ignacio Soler Garcia Sep 1 '11 at 11:25
  • Seems to lock if there isn't an Nth match. I needed to limit a comma separated value to 1000 values, and this hung when the csv had less. So @Yogesh -- probably not a great accepted answer as is. ;) Using a variant of this answer (there's a string to string version here) and changed the loop to stop at nth count instead. – ruffin Oct 11 '12 at 14:44
  • Trying to search on \, value passed in is "\\", and the match string looks like this before the regex.match function: (().*?){2}. I get this error: parsing "(().*?){2}" - Not enough )'s. What is the correct format to look for back slashes without an error? – RichieMN Feb 19 '14 at 16:53
  • 3
    Sorry but a minor criticism: regex solutions are suboptimal, because then I have to relearn regexs for the nth time. The code is essentially more difficult to read when regexes are used. – Mark Rogers May 28 '15 at 17:27
19

That's basically what you need to do - or at least, it's the easiest solution. All you'd be "wasting" is the cost of n method invocations - you won't actually be checking any case twice, if you think about it. (IndexOf will return as soon as it finds the match, and you'll keep going from where it left off.)

Here is the recursive implementation (of the above idea) as an extension method, mimicing the format of the framework method(s):

public static int IndexOfNth(this string input,
                             string value, int startIndex, int nth)
{
    if (nth < 1)
        throw new NotSupportedException("Param 'nth' must be greater than 0!");
    if (nth == 1)
        return input.IndexOf(value, startIndex);
    var idx = input.IndexOf(value, startIndex);
    if (idx == -1)
        return -1;
    return input.IndexOfNth(value, idx + 1, --nth);
}

Also, here are some (MBUnit) unit tests that might help you (to prove it is correct):

using System;
using MbUnit.Framework;

namespace IndexOfNthTest
{
    [TestFixture]
    public class Tests
    {
        //has 4 instances of the 
        private const string Input = "TestTest";
        private const string Token = "Test";

        /* Test for 0th index */

        [Test]
        public void TestZero()
        {
            Assert.Throws<NotSupportedException>(
                () => Input.IndexOfNth(Token, 0, 0));
        }

        /* Test the two standard cases (1st and 2nd) */

        [Test]
        public void TestFirst()
        {
            Assert.AreEqual(0, Input.IndexOfNth("Test", 0, 1));
        }

        [Test]
        public void TestSecond()
        {
            Assert.AreEqual(4, Input.IndexOfNth("Test", 0, 2));
        }

        /* Test the 'out of bounds' case */

        [Test]
        public void TestThird()
        {
            Assert.AreEqual(-1, Input.IndexOfNth("Test", 0, 3));
        }

        /* Test the offset case (in and out of bounds) */

        [Test]
        public void TestFirstWithOneOffset()
        {
            Assert.AreEqual(4, Input.IndexOfNth("Test", 4, 1));
        }

        [Test]
        public void TestFirstWithTwoOffsets()
        {
            Assert.AreEqual(-1, Input.IndexOfNth("Test", 8, 1));
        }
    }
}
  • I've updated my formatting and test cases based on Weston's great feedback (thanks Weston). – Tod Thomson Aug 7 '12 at 6:22
14
private int IndexOfOccurence(string s, string match, int occurence)
{
    int i = 1;
    int index = 0;

    while (i <= occurence && (index = s.IndexOf(match, index + 1)) != -1)
    {
        if (i == occurence)
            return index;

        i++;
    }

    return -1;
}

or in C# with extension methods

public static int IndexOfOccurence(this string s, string match, int occurence)
{
    int i = 1;
    int index = 0;

    while (i <= occurence && (index = s.IndexOf(match, index + 1)) != -1)
    {
        if (i == occurence)
            return index;

        i++;
    }

    return -1;
}
  • 5
    If I'm not mistaken, this method fails if the string to match starts at position 0, which can be corrected by setting index initially to -1. – Peter Majeed Jun 27 '12 at 15:59
  • 1
    You may also want to check for null or empty strings s and match or it will throw but thats a design decision. – user18443 Jan 21 '15 at 23:35
  • Thanks @PeterMajeed - if "BOB".IndexOf("B") returns 0, so should this function for IndexOfOccurence("BOB", "B", 1) – PeterX Feb 17 '15 at 3:09
  • 2
    Yours is probably the ultimate solution since it has both an extension function and it avoids regexs and recursion, both of which make code less readable. – Mark Rogers May 28 '15 at 17:29
  • @tdyen Indeed, Code Analysis will issue "CA1062: Validate arguments of public methods" if IndexOfOccurence does not check if s is null. And String.IndexOf (String, Int32) will throw ArgumentNullException if match is null. – DavidRR Jan 12 '17 at 15:34
2

After some benchmarking, this seems to be the simplest and most effcient solution

public static int IndexOfNthSB(string input,
             char value, int startIndex, int nth)
        {
            if (nth < 1)
                throw new NotSupportedException("Param 'nth' must be greater than 0!");
            var nResult = 0;
            for (int i = startIndex; i < input.Length; i++)
            {
                if (input[i] == value)
                    nResult++;
                if (nResult == nth)
                    return i;
            }
            return -1;
        }
1

Maybe it would also be nice to work with the String.Split() Method and check if the requested occurrence is in the array, if you don't need the index, but the value at the index

1

System.ValueTuple ftw:

var index = line.Select((x, i) => (x, i)).Where(x => x.Item1 == '"').ElementAt(5).Item2;

writing a function from that is homework

0

Tod's answer can be simplified somewhat.

using System;

static class MainClass {
    private static int IndexOfNth(this string target, string substring,
                                       int seqNr, int startIdx = 0)
    {
        if (seqNr < 1)
        {
            throw new IndexOutOfRangeException("Parameter 'nth' must be greater than 0.");
        }

        var idx = target.IndexOf(substring, startIdx);

        if (idx < 0 || seqNr == 1) { return idx; }

        return target.IndexOfNth(substring, --seqNr, ++idx); // skip
    }

    static void Main () {
        Console.WriteLine ("abcbcbcd".IndexOfNth("bc", 1));
        Console.WriteLine ("abcbcbcd".IndexOfNth("bc", 2));
        Console.WriteLine ("abcbcbcd".IndexOfNth("bc", 3));
        Console.WriteLine ("abcbcbcd".IndexOfNth("bc", 4));
    }
}

Output

1
3
5
-1
0

Or something like this with the do while loop

 private static int OrdinalIndexOf(string str, string substr, int n)
    {
        int pos = -1;
        do
        {
            pos = str.IndexOf(substr, pos + 1);
        } while (n-- > 0 && pos != -1);
        return pos;
    }
-4

This might do it:

Console.WriteLine(str.IndexOf((@"\")+2)+1);
  • 2
    I don't see how this would work. Could you include a brief explanation of what this does? – Bob Kaufman Jul 8 '12 at 17:03

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