133

Is it possible to use Async when using ForEach? Below is the code I am trying:

using (DataContext db = new DataLayer.DataContext())
{
    db.Groups.ToList().ForEach(i => async {
        await GetAdminsFromGroup(i.Gid);
    });
}

I am getting the error:

The name 'Async' does not exist in the current context

The method the using statement is enclosed in is set to async.

0
200

List<T>.ForEach doesn't play particularly well with async (neither does LINQ-to-objects, for the same reasons).

In this case, I recommend projecting each element into an asynchronous operation, and you can then (asynchronously) wait for them all to complete.

using (DataContext db = new DataLayer.DataContext())
{
    var tasks = db.Groups.ToList().Select(i => GetAdminsFromGroupAsync(i.Gid));
    var results = await Task.WhenAll(tasks);
}

The benefits of this approach over giving an async delegate to ForEach are:

  1. Error handling is more proper. Exceptions from async void cannot be caught with catch; this approach will propagate exceptions at the await Task.WhenAll line, allowing natural exception handling.
  2. You know that the tasks are complete at the end of this method, since it does an await Task.WhenAll. If you use async void, you cannot easily tell when the operations have completed.
  3. This approach has a natural syntax for retrieving the results. GetAdminsFromGroupAsync sounds like it's an operation that produces a result (the admins), and such code is more natural if such operations can return their results rather than setting a value as a side effect.
8
  • 7
    Not that it changes anything, but List.ForEach() is not part of LINQ. – svick Sep 7 '13 at 2:10
  • Great suggestion @StephenCleary and thank you for all the answers you've given about async. They have been very helpful! – Justin Helgerson Apr 3 '14 at 20:06
  • 5
    @StewartAnderson: The tasks will execute concurrently. There's no extension for serial execution; just do a foreach with an await in your loop body. – Stephen Cleary Aug 2 '15 at 1:50
  • 2
    @mare: ForEach only takes a synchronous delegate type, and there's no overload taking an asynchronous delegate type. So the short answer is "no one wrote an asynchronous ForEach". The longer answer is that you'd have to assume some semantics; e.g., should the items be processed one at a time (like foreach), or simultaneously (like Select)? If one at a time, wouldn't asynchronous streams be a better solution? If simultaneously, should the results be in original item order or in order of completion? Should it fail on the first failure or wait until all have completed? Etc. – Stephen Cleary Oct 17 '19 at 18:01
  • 2
    @RogerWolf: Yes; use SemaphoreSlim to throttle asynchronous tasks. – Stephen Cleary Apr 5 '20 at 10:53
64

This little extension method should give you exception-safe async iteration:

public static async Task ForEachAsync<T>(this List<T> list, Func<T, Task> func)
{
    foreach (var value in list)
    {
        await func(value);
    }
}

Since we're changing the return type of the lambda from void to Task, exceptions will propagate up correctly. This will allow you to write something like this in practice:

await db.Groups.ToList().ForEachAsync(async i => {
    await GetAdminsFromGroup(i.Gid);
});
3
  • Instead of awaiting the ForEachAsyn(), one could also call a Wait(). – Jonas Feb 3 '17 at 21:08
  • Lambda do not need to be awaited here. – hazzik Apr 3 '17 at 1:25
  • I would add support for CancellationToken into that as in Todd's Answer here stackoverflow.com/questions/29787098/… – Zorkind Dec 18 '17 at 17:45
17

The simple answer is to use the foreach keyword instead of the ForEach() method of List().

using (DataContext db = new DataLayer.DataContext())
{
    foreach(var i in db.Groups)
    {
        await GetAdminsFromGroup(i.Gid);
    }
}
0
11

Starting with C# 8.0, you can create and consume streams asynchronously.

    private async void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        IAsyncEnumerable<int> enumerable = GenerateSequence();

        await foreach (var i in enumerable)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(i);
        }
    }

    public static async IAsyncEnumerable<int> GenerateSequence()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++)
        {
            await Task.Delay(100);
            yield return i;
        }
    }

More

1
  • 1
    This has the advantage that on top of awaiting each element, you are now also awaiting the MoveNext of the enumerator. This is important in cases where the enumerator cannot fetch the next element instantly, and must wait for one to become available. – Theodor Zoulias Sep 26 '19 at 9:10
10

Here is an actual working version of the above async foreach variants with sequential processing:

public static async Task ForEachAsync<T>(this List<T> enumerable, Action<T> action)
{
    foreach (var item in enumerable)
        await Task.Run(() => { action(item); }).ConfigureAwait(false);
}

Here is the implementation:

public async void SequentialAsync()
{
    var list = new List<Action>();

    Action action1 = () => {
        //do stuff 1
    };

    Action action2 = () => {
        //do stuff 2
    };

    list.Add(action1);
    list.Add(action2);

    await list.ForEachAsync();
}

What's the key difference? .ConfigureAwait(false); which keeps the context of main thread while async sequential processing of each task.

3

The problem was that the async keyword needs to appear before the lambda, not before the body:

db.Groups.ToList().ForEach(async (i) => {
    await GetAdminsFromGroup(i.Gid);
});
2
  • 39
    This is an unnecessary and subtle use of async void. This approach has problems around exception handling and knowing when the asynchronous operations complete. – Stephen Cleary Sep 7 '13 at 1:23
  • Yes, I found this doesn't handle exceptions properly. – Herman Schoenfeld Sep 28 '13 at 15:35
2

Add this extension method

public static class ForEachAsyncExtension
{
    public static Task ForEachAsync<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int dop, Func<T, Task> body)
    {
        return Task.WhenAll(from partition in Partitioner.Create(source).GetPartitions(dop) 
            select Task.Run(async delegate
            {
                using (partition)
                    while (partition.MoveNext())
                        await body(partition.Current).ConfigureAwait(false);
            }));
    }
}

And then use like so:

Task.Run(async () =>
{
    var s3 = new AmazonS3Client(Config.Instance.Aws.Credentials, Config.Instance.Aws.RegionEndpoint);
    var buckets = await s3.ListBucketsAsync();

    foreach (var s3Bucket in buckets.Buckets)
    {
        if (s3Bucket.BucketName.StartsWith("mybucket-"))
        {
            log.Information("Bucket => {BucketName}", s3Bucket.BucketName);

            ListObjectsResponse objects;
            try
            {
                objects = await s3.ListObjectsAsync(s3Bucket.BucketName);
            }
            catch
            {
                log.Error("Error getting objects. Bucket => {BucketName}", s3Bucket.BucketName);
                continue;
            }

            // ForEachAsync (4 is how many tasks you want to run in parallel)
            await objects.S3Objects.ForEachAsync(4, async s3Object =>
            {
                try
                {
                    log.Information("Bucket => {BucketName} => {Key}", s3Bucket.BucketName, s3Object.Key);
                    await s3.DeleteObjectAsync(s3Bucket.BucketName, s3Object.Key);
                }
                catch
                {
                    log.Error("Error deleting bucket {BucketName} object {Key}", s3Bucket.BucketName, s3Object.Key);
                }
            });

            try
            {
                await s3.DeleteBucketAsync(s3Bucket.BucketName);
            }
            catch
            {
                log.Error("Error deleting bucket {BucketName}", s3Bucket.BucketName);
            }
        }
    }
}).Wait();
0
0

This is method I created to handle async scenarios with ForEach.

  • If one of tasks fails then other tasks will continue their execution.
  • You have ability to add function that will be executed on every exception.
  • Exceptions are being collected as aggregateException at the end and are available for you.
  • Can handle CancellationToken
 public static class ParallelExecutor
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Executes asynchronously given function on all elements of given enumerable with task count restriction.
        /// Executor will continue starting new tasks even if one of the tasks throws. If at least one of the tasks throwed exception then <see cref="AggregateException"/> is throwed at the end of the method run.
        /// </summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T">Type of elements in enumerable</typeparam>
        /// <param name="maxTaskCount">The maximum task count.</param>
        /// <param name="enumerable">The enumerable.</param>
        /// <param name="asyncFunc">asynchronous function that will be executed on every element of the enumerable. MUST be thread safe.</param>
        /// <param name="onException">Acton that will be executed on every exception that would be thrown by asyncFunc. CAN be thread unsafe.</param>
        /// <param name="cancellationToken">The cancellation token.</param>
        public static async Task ForEachAsync<T>(int maxTaskCount, IEnumerable<T> enumerable, Func<T, Task> asyncFunc, Action<Exception> onException = null, CancellationToken cancellationToken = default)
        {
            using var semaphore = new SemaphoreSlim(initialCount: maxTaskCount, maxCount: maxTaskCount);

            // This `lockObject` is used only in `catch { }` block.
            object lockObject = new object();
            var exceptions = new List<Exception>();
            var tasks = new Task[enumerable.Count()];
            int i = 0;

            try
            {
                foreach (var t in enumerable)
                {
                    await semaphore.WaitAsync(cancellationToken);
                    tasks[i++] = Task.Run(
                        async () =>
                        {
                            try
                            {
                                await asyncFunc(t);
                            }
                            catch (Exception e)
                            {
                                if (onException != null)
                                {
                                    lock (lockObject)
                                    {
                                        onException.Invoke(e);
                                    }
                                }

                                // This exception will be swallowed here but it will be collected at the end of ForEachAsync method in order to generate AggregateException.
                                throw;
                            }
                            finally
                            {
                                semaphore.Release();
                            }
                        }, cancellationToken);

                    if (cancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested)
                    {
                        break;
                    }
                }
            }
            catch (OperationCanceledException e)
            {
                exceptions.Add(e);
            }

            foreach (var t in tasks)
            {
                if (cancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested)
                {
                    break;
                }

                // Exception handling in this case is actually pretty fast.
                // https://gist.github.com/shoter/d943500eda37c7d99461ce3dace42141
                try
                {
                    await t;
                }
#pragma warning disable CA1031 // Do not catch general exception types - we want to throw that exception later as aggregate exception. Nothing wrong here.
                catch (Exception e)
#pragma warning restore CA1031 // Do not catch general exception types
                {
                    exceptions.Add(e);
                }
            }

            if (exceptions.Any())
            {
                throw new AggregateException(exceptions);
            }
        }
    }
13
  • There are some problems with your implementation. 1. The source IEnumerable<T> is enumerated twice because of the Count(), which is a no-no. The enumerable may be hitting the database/filesystem/web on each enumeration. 2. The Task.Factory.StartNew(async produces a Task<Task>, and you are awaiting only the outer Task. The method may not propagate all exceptions, and may return before all tasks have been completed. And 3. using the cancellationToken.IsCancellationRequested may result to inconsistent cancellation behavior. Use the ThrowIfCancellationRequested instead. – Theodor Zoulias Dec 15 '20 at 5:49
  • Regarding the Action<Exception> onException = null parameter, what is its use case? Is it for logging the errors as soon as they happen, as opposed to logging them in batch after the completion of the ForEachAsync method? – Theodor Zoulias Dec 15 '20 at 7:30
  • 1
    You were right with exceptions. Now I use Task.Run and it does not swallow them. – Shoter Dec 15 '20 at 9:11
  • 1
    @TheodorZoulias Thank you for helping me with improving that design. Great work! I am really grateful :) – Shoter Dec 15 '20 at 11:15
  • 1
    Thank you four insight. Next time I am going to take a look at TPL library. Thanks for direction! @TheodorZoulias – Shoter Dec 15 '20 at 14:19
-1

I would like to add that there is a Parallel class with ForEach function built in that can be used for this purpose.

3
  • The Parallel class is not async-friendly. – Theodor Zoulias Jan 2 at 15:47
  • @TheodorZoulias I see. I thought it would achieve a simmilar result - crunch the list with multiple threads as fast as possible. I misunderstood the desired outcome. – Luk164 Jan 2 at 17:29
  • The Parallel class is great for CPU-bound work, but not for I/O-bound work. For example you don't really need threads when you are doing web requests. – Theodor Zoulias Jan 2 at 17:55

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