840

I'm unable to get numeric comparisons working:

echo "enter two numbers";
read a b;

echo "a=$a";
echo "b=$b";

if [ $a \> $b ];
then
    echo "a is greater than b";
else
    echo "b is greater than a";
fi;

The problem is that it compares the number from the first digit on, i.e., 9 is bigger than 10, but 1 is greater than 09.

How can I convert the numbers into a type to do a true comparison?

4
  • 10
    BTW, in bash a semi-colon is a statement separator, not a statement terminator, which is a new-line. So if you only have one statement on a line then the ; at end-of-line are superfluous. Not doing any harm, just a waste of keystrokes (unless you enjoy typing semi-colons).
    – cdarke
    Sep 15, 2013 at 21:37
  • 7
    To force numbers with leading zeros into decimals: 10#$number so number=09; echo "$((10#$number))" will output 9 while echo $((number)) will produce a "value too great for base" error. Dec 4, 2013 at 17:36
  • 5
    The answers all tell you what's right, but not what's wrong: what the > operator does in the [ command is to compare the order two strings should sort in, rather than the order they would sort in as numbers. You can find more info in man test. Jan 15, 2016 at 11:57
  • See also unix.stackexchange.com/q/278707/6993
    – Flow
    Nov 21, 2022 at 13:53

10 Answers 10

1285

In Bash, you should do your check in an arithmetic context:

if (( a > b )); then
    ...
fi

For POSIX shells that don't support (()), you can use -lt and -gt.

if [ "$a" -gt "$b" ]; then
    ...
fi

You can get a full list of comparison operators with help test or man test.

18
  • 14
    As said by @jordanm "$a" -gt "$b" is the right answer. Here is a good list of test operator: Test Constructs. Sep 7, 2013 at 0:51
  • 11
    @advert2013 you shouldn't prefix numbers with zeros. zero-prefixed numbers are octal in bash Sep 7, 2013 at 1:03
  • 1
    Ah ok, that solves that mystery then - I don't really have any use for zero prefixed numbers but it is nice to know where errors are coming from
    – advert2013
    Sep 7, 2013 at 1:06
  • 11
    Beware that test is a program as is [. So help test gives information about that. To find out what the built-ins ([[ and (() do you should use help bash and navigate to that part.
    – RedX
    Mar 25, 2015 at 12:20
  • 2
    Arithmetic expressions are great, but operands are treated as expressions.
    – x-yuri
    Dec 23, 2018 at 12:21
301

Like this:

#!/bin/bash

a=2462620
b=2462620

if [ "$a" -eq "$b" ]; then
  echo "They're equal";
fi

Integers can be compared with these operators:

-eq # Equal
-ne # Not equal
-lt # Less than
-le # Less than or equal
-gt # Greater than
-ge # Greater than or equal

See this cheatsheet.

8
  • 1
    I just undid your other change - the double quotes around "$a" and "$b" aren't strictly necessary but they are good practice. Curly braces don't do anything useful here.
    – Tom Fenech
    Aug 29, 2017 at 9:55
  • 3
    great cheatsheet that you linked, didn't find it before - now bash doesn't seem so magic and unpredictable anymore - thank you!
    – Ilja
    Aug 8, 2018 at 11:36
  • 1
    are the quotes " mandatory or is just [ $a -eq $b ] also fine?
    – derHugo
    Aug 8, 2018 at 18:29
  • 2
    @derHugo quotes are optional. Gilles has a better explanation on when to use them unix.stackexchange.com/a/68748/50394 Aug 13, 2018 at 18:34
  • 8
    You don't need quotes if you use double brackets: if [[ $a -eq $b ]];then
    – jaques-sam
    Jun 11, 2020 at 12:15
57

There is also one nice thing some people might not know about:

echo $(( a < b ? a : b ))

This code will print the smallest number out of a and b

8
  • 10
    That's not true. It would also print b if a == b.
    – konsolebox
    Sep 7, 2013 at 1:13
  • 115
    @konsolebox is it just me, or the smallest number out of 5 and 5 is 5? Sep 7, 2013 at 1:14
  • 5
    Your statement is ambiguous. Even applying on a command like this won't do: echo "The smaller number is $(( a < b ? a : b ))."
    – konsolebox
    Sep 7, 2013 at 1:16
  • 5
    What he's saying is that a < b is still true if a == b. I don't know all of the vagaries of Bash's conditionals, but there are almost certainly situations where this would make a difference.
    – bikemule
    Jan 12, 2016 at 7:58
  • 6
    @bikemule No, he's not saying that. If a == b, then a < b evaluates to false, which is why it would print b.
    – mapeters
    Jul 14, 2017 at 21:43
38

In Bash I prefer doing this as it addresses itself more as a conditional operation unlike using (( )) which is more of arithmetic.

[[ n -gt m ]]

Unless I do complex stuff like

(( (n + 1) > m ))

But everyone just has their own preferences. Sad thing is that some people impose their unofficial standards.

You can also do this:

[[ 'n + 1' -gt m ]]

Which allows you to add something else which you could do with [[ ]] besides arithmetic stuff.

5
  • 4
    This seems to imply that [[ ]] forces an arithmetic context like (( )), where N gets treated as if it were $N, but I don't think that's correct. Or, if that wasn't the intention, the usage of N and M is confusing. Sep 30, 2017 at 20:58
  • 1
    @BenjaminW.This would require confirmation from Chet but -eq, -ne, -lt, -le, -gt, and -ge are forms of "arithmetic tests" (documented) which could imply that the operands are subject to arithmetic expressions as well..
    – konsolebox
    Nov 24, 2019 at 4:37
  • Thanks for coming back to this, as you're completely right and the manual clearly states it: "When used with the [[ command, Arg1 and Arg2 are evaluated as arithmetic expressions [...]". Nov 24, 2019 at 19:52
  • 1
    I have NUMBER=0.0; while [[ "$NUMBER" -lt "1.0" ]]; do and it says bash: [[: 0.0: syntax error: invalid arithmetic operator (error token is ".0") Dec 28, 2019 at 0:10
  • 1
    @AaronFranke Bash arithmetic doesn't support decimals.
    – konsolebox
    Dec 28, 2019 at 8:10
11

The bracket stuff (e.g., [[ $a -gt $b ]] or (( $a > $b )) ) isn't enough if you want to use float numbers as well; it would report a syntax error. If you want to compare float numbers or float number to integer, you can use (( $(bc <<< "...") )).

For example,

a=2.00
b=1

if (( $(bc <<<"$a > $b") )); then 
    echo "a is greater than b"
else
    echo "a is not greater than b"
fi

You can include more than one comparison in the if statement. For example,

a=2.
b=1
c=1.0000

if (( $(bc <<<"$b == $c && $b < $a") )); then 
    echo "b is equal to c but less than a"
else
    echo "b is either not equal to c and/or not less than a"
fi

That's helpful if you want to check if a numeric variable (integer or not) is within a numeric range.

2
  • 1
    This does not work for me. As far as I can tell, the bc command does not return an exit value but instead prints "1" if the comparison is true (and "0" otherwise). I have to write this instead: if [ "$(bc <<<"$a > $b") == "1" ]; then echo "a is greater than b; fi Nov 6, 2019 at 13:05
  • @TerjeMikal For your command, do you mean if [ $(bc <<<"$a > $b") == "1" ]; then echo "a is greater than b"; fi? (I think your command was mis-written.) If so, that works, too. The Bash Calculator (bc) command is a basic calculator command. Some more usage examples found here and here. I don't know why my example command didn't work for you though. Nov 12, 2019 at 22:40
8

This code can also compare floats. It is using AWK (it is not pure Bash). However, this shouldn't be a problem, as AWK is a standard POSIX command that is most likely shipped by default with your operating system.

$ awk 'BEGIN {return_code=(-1.2345 == -1.2345) ? 0 : 1; exit} END {exit return_code}'
$ echo $?
0
$ awk 'BEGIN {return_code=(-1.2345 >= -1.2345) ? 0 : 1; exit} END {exit return_code}'
$ echo $?
0
$ awk 'BEGIN {return_code=(-1.2345 < -1.2345) ? 0 : 1; exit} END {exit return_code}'
$ echo $?
1
$ awk 'BEGIN {return_code=(-1.2345 < 2) ? 0 : 1; exit} END {exit return_code}'
$ echo $?
0
$ awk 'BEGIN {return_code=(-1.2345 > 2) ? 0 : 1; exit} END {exit return_code}'
$ echo $?

To make it shorter for use, use this function:

compare_nums()
{
   # Function to compare two numbers (float or integers) by using AWK.
   # The function will not print anything, but it will return 0 (if the comparison is true) or 1
   # (if the comparison is false) exit codes, so it can be used directly in shell one liners.
   #############
   ### Usage ###
   ### Note that you have to enclose the comparison operator in quotes.
   #############
   # compare_nums 1 ">" 2 # returns false
   # compare_nums 1.23 "<=" 2 # returns true
   # compare_nums -1.238 "<=" -2 # returns false
   #############################################
   num1=$1
   op=$2
   num2=$3
   E_BADARGS=65

   # Make sure that the provided numbers are actually numbers.
   if ! [[ $num1 =~ ^-?[0-9]+([.][0-9]+)?$ ]]; then >&2 echo "$num1 is not a number"; return $E_BADARGS; fi
   if ! [[ $num2 =~ ^-?[0-9]+([.][0-9]+)?$ ]]; then >&2 echo "$num2 is not a number"; return $E_BADARGS; fi

   # If you want to print the exit code as well (instead of only returning it), uncomment
   # the awk line below and comment the uncommented one which is two lines below.
   #awk 'BEGIN {print return_code=('$num1' '$op' '$num2') ? 0 : 1; exit} END {exit return_code}'
   awk 'BEGIN {return_code=('$num1' '$op' '$num2') ? 0 : 1; exit} END {exit return_code}'
   return_code=$?
   return $return_code
}

$ compare_nums -1.2345 ">=" -1.2345 && echo true || echo false
true
$ compare_nums -1.2345 ">=" 23 && echo true || echo false
false
1
  • 1
    I'm working with large numbers and bash fails to compare them properly (try if (( 18446744073692774399 < 8589934592 )); then echo 'integer overflow'; fi). awk works like a charm (if awk "BEGIN {return_code=(18446744073692774399 > 8589934592) ? 0 : 1; exit} END {exit return_code}"; then echo 'no integer overflow'; fi).
    – jaume
    Nov 1, 2017 at 15:47
8

If you have floats, you can write a function and then use that. For example,

#!/bin/bash

function float_gt() {
    perl -e "{if($1>$2){print 1} else {print 0}}"
}

x=3.14
y=5.20
if [ $(float_gt $x $y) == 1 ] ; then
    echo "do stuff with x"
else
    echo "do stuff with y"
fi
8

One-line solution.

a=2
b=1
[[ ${a} -gt ${b} ]] && echo "true" || echo "false"

gt reference: https://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/html_node/Bash-Conditional-Expressions.html

&& reference: https://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/html_node/Shell-Arithmetic.html

[[...]] construct reference: https://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bash.html#index-_005b_005b

${} reference: https://pubs.opengroup.org/onlinepubs/9699919799/utilities/V3_chap02.html#tag_18_06_02 (2.6.2)

The format for parameter expansion is as follows:

${expression}

where expression consists of all characters until the matching '}'. Any '}' escaped by a or within a quoted string, and characters in embedded arithmetic expansions, command substitutions, and variable expansions, shall not be examined in determining the matching '}'.

The simplest form for parameter expansion is:

${parameter}

1
  • 1
    An explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist? Is it a way to implement the ternary operator? From the Help Center: "...always explain why the solution you're presenting is appropriate and how it works". Please respond by editing (changing) your answer, not here in comments (without "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Jan 21, 2022 at 13:54
3

I solved this by using a small function to convert version strings to plain integer values that can be compared:

function versionToInt() {
  local IFS=.
  parts=($1)
  let val=1000000*parts[0]+1000*parts[1]+parts[2]
  echo $val
}

This makes two important assumptions:

  1. The input is a "normal SemVer string"
  2. Each part is between 0-999

For example

versionToInt 12.34.56  # --> 12034056
versionToInt 1.2.3     # -->  1002003

Example testing whether npm command meets the minimum requirement...

NPM_ACTUAL=$(versionToInt $(npm --version))  # Capture npm version
NPM_REQUIRED=$(versionToInt 4.3.0)           # Desired version
if [ $NPM_ACTUAL \< $NPM_REQUIRED ]; then
  echo "Please update to npm@latest"
  exit 1
fi
2
  • with 'sort -V' you can sort version numbers and then decide what to do then. You can write a compare function like this: function version_lt() { test "$(printf '%s\n' "$@" | sort -V | head -n 1)" == "$1"; } and use it like this: if version_lt $v1 $v2; then ...
    – koem
    Feb 8, 2018 at 16:04
  • What if the version string numbers have leading zeros? Will they be interpreted as octal numbers? Jan 21, 2022 at 13:53
1

Just adding to all the above answers:

If you have more than one expression in single if statement, you can do something like this:

if (( $a % 2 == 0 )) && (( $b % 2 != 0));
  then
  echo "What you want to do"
fi

Hope this helps!

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