112

I have got an array which I am looping through. Every time a condition is true, I want to append a copy of the HTML code below to a container element with some values.

Where can I put this HTML to re-use in a smart way?

<a href="#" class="list-group-item">
    <div class="image">
         <img src="" />
    </div>
    <p class="list-group-item-text"></p>
</a>

JQuery

$('.search').keyup(function() {
    $('.list-items').html(null);

    $.each(items, function(index) {
        // APPENDING CODE HERE
    });
});
  • 2
    If you're looking for a smart way, put all your info in a single DIV and style it. Don't create numerous tables with only two cells, don't wrap them into anchors. – Sergey Snegirev Sep 7 '13 at 13:39
  • 3
    OP is obviously interested in proper coding practices (kudos!), so I wanted to help. If I wanted to contribute to the actual problem, I'd post an answer. I'm sure anyone agrees that using a full-blown two-cell table to position an image and some text is barely justified except for some really exotic requirements (IE4?) – Sergey Snegirev Sep 7 '13 at 13:54
  • 1
    @BrianG. Posting a comment doesn't really imply you're going off on a tangent though. While I agree that comments are an appropriate venue for those (as long as they're still relevant), they're also appropriate for drive-by hints by people who don't have time to expand them into an answer yet. It's helpful to the OP to make it clear which you're doing. – millimoose Sep 7 '13 at 14:06
  • No-one answered your question, Patrick? – Sebastian Neira Sep 8 '13 at 11:46
152

You could decide to make use of a templating engine in your project, such as:

If you don't want to include another library, John Resig offers a jQuery solution, similar to the one below.


Browsers and screen readers ignore unrecognized script types:

<script id="hidden-template" type="text/x-custom-template">
    <tr>
        <td>Foo</td>
        <td>Bar</td>
    <tr>
</script>

Using jQuery, adding rows based on the template would resemble:

var template = $('#hidden-template').html();

$('button.addRow').click(function() {
    $('#targetTable').append(template);
});
  • @MaksimLuzik is right. Mustache (note the trademark spelling) is lighter-weight and will plug into the OP's code, but Handlebars has more features for handling arrays, and may provide a more sufficient solution in the end. Here's a nice comparison article: blog.cubettech.com/… – Michael Scheper Jan 7 '15 at 20:55
  • 9
    Example of how to edit the template here: jsfiddle.net/meehanman/7vw8bc84 – Dean Meehan Apr 13 '16 at 14:49
154

Old question, but since the question asks "using jQuery", I thought I'd provide an option that lets you do this without introducing any vendor dependency.

While there are a lot of templating engines out there, many of their features have fallen in to disfavour recently, with iteration (<% for), conditionals (<% if) and transforms (<%= myString | uppercase %>) seen as microlanguage at best, and anti-patterns at worst. Modern templating practices encourage simply mapping an object to its DOM (or other) representation, e.g. what we see with properties mapped to components in ReactJS (especially stateless components).

Templates Inside HTML

One property you can rely on for keeping the HTML for your template next to the rest of your HTML, is by using a non-executing <script> type, e.g. <script type="text/template">. For your case:

<script type="text/template" data-template="listitem">
    <a href="${url}" class="list-group-item">
        <table>
            <tr>
                <td><img src="${img}"></td>
                <td><p class="list-group-item-text">${title}</p></td>
            </tr>
        </table>
    </a>
</script>

On document load, read your template and tokenize it using a simple String#split

var itemTpl = $('script[data-template="listitem"]').text().split(/\$\{(.+?)\}/g);

Notice that with our token, you get it in the alternating [text, property, text, property] format. This lets us nicely map it using an Array#map, with a mapping function:

function render(props) {
  return function(tok, i) { return (i % 2) ? props[tok] : tok; };
}

Where props could look like { url: 'http://foo.com', img: '/images/bar.png', title: 'Lorem Ipsum' }.

Putting it all together assuming you've parsed and loaded your itemTpl as above, and you have an items array in-scope:

$('.search').keyup(function () {
  $('.list-items').append(items.map(function (item) {
    return itemTpl.map(render(item)).join('');
  }));
});

This approach is also only just barely jQuery - you should be able to take the same approach using vanilla javascript with document.querySelector and .innerHTML.

jsfiddle

Templates inside JS

A question to ask yourself is: do you really want/need to define templates as HTML files? You can always componentize + re-use a template the same way you'd re-use most things you want to repeat: with a function.

In es7-land, using destructuring, template strings, and arrow-functions, you can write downright pretty looking component functions that can be easily loaded using the $.fn.html method above.

const Item = ({ url, img, title }) => `
  <a href="${url}" class="list-group-item">
    <div class="image">
      <img src="${img}" />
    </div>
    <p class="list-group-item-text">${title}</p>
  </a>
`;

Then you could easily render it, even mapped from an array, like so:

$('.list-items').html([
  { url: '/foo', img: 'foo.png', title: 'Foo item' },
  { url: '/bar', img: 'bar.png', title: 'Bar item' },
].map(Item).join(''));

Oh and final note: don't forget to sanitize your properties passed to a template, if they're read from a DB, or someone could pass in HTML (and then run scripts, etc.) from your page.

  • 1
    Nice template engine. – Arthur Castro Feb 7 '17 at 10:30
  • 33
    Your Templates inside JS section is the bomb – BigRon Feb 23 '17 at 20:28
  • 2
    Could you please add a demo/fiddle for "Templates Inside HTML" approach? – LCJ Mar 31 '17 at 17:47
  • 1
    Wow! Template inside JS... Never thought of that! Amazing! – Roman Lopez Aug 31 '17 at 15:29
  • 1
    Wow, this is really very nice. I'm adding a data-url attribute to each template. And fetching ajax data for each one. This is so nice and saved me so much time! Thank you. – Davey Apr 5 '18 at 16:09
36

Use HTML template instead!

Since the accepted answer would represent overloading script method, I would like to suggest another which is, in my opinion, much cleaner and more secure due to XSS risks which come with overloading scripts.

I made a demo to show you how to use it in an action and how to inject one template into another, edit and then add to the document DOM.

example html

<template id="mytemplate">
  <style>
     .image{
        width: 100%;
        height: auto;
     }
  </style>
  <a href="#" class="list-group-item">
    <div class="image">
      <img src="" />
    </div>
    <p class="list-group-item-text"></p>
  </a>
</template>

example js

// select
var t = document.querySelector('#mytemplate');

// set
t.content.querySelector('img').src = 'demo.png';
t.content.querySelector('p').textContent= 'demo text';

// add to document DOM
var clone = document.importNode(t.content, true); // where true means deep copy
document.body.appendChild(clone);

HTML <template>

  • +Its content is effectively inert until activated. Essentially, your markup is hidden DOM and does not render.

  • +Any content within a template won't have side effects. Scripts don't run, images don't load, audio doesn't play ...until the template is used.

  • +Content is considered not to be in the document. Using document.getElementById() or querySelector() in the main page won't return child nodes of a template.

  • +Templates can be placed anywhere inside of <head>, <body>, or <frameset> and can contain any type of content which is allowed in those elements. Note that "anywhere" means that <template> can safely be used in places that the HTML parser disallows.

Fall back

Browser support should not be an issue but if you want to cover all possibilities you can make an easy check:

To feature detect <template>, create the DOM element and check that the .content property exists:

function supportsTemplate() {
  return 'content' in document.createElement('template');
}

if (supportsTemplate()) {
  // Good to go!
} else {
  // Use old templating techniques or libraries.
}

Some insights about Overloading script method

  • +Nothing is rendered - the browser doesn't render this block because the <script> tag has display:none by default.
  • +Inert - the browser doesn't parse the script content as JS because its type is set to something other than "text/javascript".
  • -Security issues - encourages the use of .innerHTML. Run-time string parsing of user-supplied data can easily lead to XSS vulnerabilities.

Full article: https://www.html5rocks.com/en/tutorials/webcomponents/template/#toc-old

Useful reference: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/API/Document/importNode http://caniuse.com/#feat=queryselector

  • 3
    The template element is not supported by Internet Explorer (as of 2018, IE11). Tested with example 580 of w3c.github.io/html/single-page.html . – Roland Feb 16 '18 at 14:21
  • I like the <template>, though I'd recommend using classes liberally, so it's clear what props are getting set to what. It still takes some js skills to map your data into the template properly, especially using a components-style approach to mapping in large sets of data. Personally I still like just building the HTML in functions, or ideally building the DOM directly with JS itself and forgoing HTML altogether (e.g. how React does it). – Josh from Qaribou Apr 27 '18 at 13:51
  • The template approach worked well for me. One recommendation I have is to clone the template first (rather than at the end) and work with the cloned object. Otherwise, the changes you are making are happening to the template itself. If you had conditional logic where you set some properties/content only some of the time, those properties would be present in your next use of the template. By cloning before each use, you ensure that you always have a consistent base to work from. – jt. Aug 29 '19 at 13:55
14

Add somewhere in body

<div class="hide">
<a href="#" class="list-group-item">
    <table>
        <tr>
            <td><img src=""></td>
            <td><p class="list-group-item-text"></p></td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</a>
</div>

then create css

.hide { display: none; }

and add to your js

$('#output').append( $('.hide').html() );
  • 1
    The OP has a JSON and wants to render some html using that array as data source. How this answer is addressing the problem? Your answer takes a html node and clones/duplicates it and nothing related to data binding. – Adrian Iftode Sep 7 '13 at 14:03
  • So me is who is downvoting. – Adrian Iftode Sep 7 '13 at 14:04
  • I really think you're not helping into getting a better answer, as you could've started with reminding us that the point was wider that what was addressed by our answers. – Sebastian Neira Sep 7 '13 at 14:39
  • 1
    This does work, but it is more efficient to do .children().clone(), rather than .html(). The speed is about 3:1 for a random <tr/> I had on a page using this code i=10000; time=performance.now(); while (--i) {$a.clone().append(0 ? $b.html() : $b.children().clone())} performance.now()-time. The ratio is actually a bit more exaggerated because I'm using $a.clone(), but trying to empty it each iteration is more of a performance hit than cloning, so I'm not sure how to make it any more accurate because timing functions have their own cost. – Chinoto Vokro Jun 21 '16 at 0:39
  • 1
    This aproach is bad. mainly because you get template content download and parsed even if you did not use it. This is too big issue to consider this as a valid answer. Also as someone else menthon above, if you must to at least use clone instead of .html() – DevWL Oct 12 '17 at 5:02
3

Other alternative: Pure

I use it and it has helped me a lot. An example shown on their website:

HTML

<div class="who">
</div>

JSON

{
  "who": "Hello Wrrrld"
}

Result

<div class="who">
  Hello Wrrrld
</div>
2

In order to solve this problem, I recognize two solutions:

  • The first one goes with AJAX, with which you'll have to load the template from another file and just add everytime you want with .clone().

    $.get('url/to/template', function(data) {
        temp = data
        $('.search').keyup(function() {
            $('.list-items').html(null);
    
            $.each(items, function(index) {
                 $(this).append(temp.clone())
            });
    
        });
    });
    

    Take into account that the event should be added once the ajax has completed to be sure the data is available!

  • The second one would be to directly add it anywhere in the original html, select it and hide it in jQuery:

    temp = $('.list_group_item').hide()
    

    You can after add a new instance of the template with

    $('.search').keyup(function() {
        $('.list-items').html(null);
    
        $.each(items, function(index) {
            $(this).append(temp.clone())
        });
    });
    
  • Same as the previous one, but if you don't want the template to remain there, but just in the javascript, I think you can use (have not tested it!) .detach() instead of hide.

    temp = $('.list_group_item').detach()
    

    .detach() removes elements from the DOM while keeping the data and events alive (.remove() does not!).

  • -- No Problemo! -- – iConnor Sep 7 '13 at 13:48
  • The op has a JSON and wants to render some html using that array as data source. How this answer is addressing the problem? Your answer takes a html node and clones/duplicates it and nothing related to data binding. – Adrian Iftode Sep 7 '13 at 14:02
  • 1
    I quote from op: I want to append a copy of the HTML code below to a container element with some values. I believe this addresses his problem. – Sebastian Neira Sep 7 '13 at 14:14
  • And how is treated the "some values" part? – Adrian Iftode Sep 7 '13 at 14:32
  • Well, that does not mean does it not address the problem. I appreciate that you've told me that I was missing one of the points :) Anyway, how am I to know how to insert those values if I don't even know what values are we talking about? Just take a look at this part Where can I put this HTML to re-use in a smart way?. What is really being asked? About the JSON or the HTML inclusion? – Sebastian Neira Sep 7 '13 at 14:37

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