19

In Android, when I create Toast and show them, they appear consecutively. The problem is that I have a button that checks some fields and if the user enters incorrect data, a Toast is shown. If the user touches the button repeatedly, Toasts are accumulated and the message does not disappear for a couple of seconds.

Which is the best way to avoid that?

  • May I save the reference to the last Toast and remove it before making a new one?
  • Should I use the same Toast for all messages?
  • Might I use any method that clears all the Application Toasts before making and showing the new one?
3
  • 1
    i have the same problem, i share you few ideas that haven't worked, making toast final, using if conditions also, using counters.. :\ i will watch this question now. Commented Sep 7, 2013 at 18:25
  • 2
    Hola(Hello) Didac, have you tried this or that ?
    – AlexBcn
    Commented Sep 7, 2013 at 18:27
  • 1
    The best way is to not use Toasts. :) might Commented Sep 7, 2013 at 18:34

4 Answers 4

42

You can use the cancel() method of Toast to close a showing Toast.

Use a variable to keep a reference to every Toast as you show it, and simply call cancel() before showing another one.

private Toast mToast = null; // <-- keep this in your Activity or even in a custom Application class

//... show one Toast
if (mToast != null) mToast.cancel();
mToast = Toast.makeText(context, text, duration);
mToast.show();

//... show another Toast
if (mToast != null) mToast.cancel();
mToast = Toast.makeText(context, text, duration);
mToast.show();

// and so on.

You could even wrap that into a small class like so:

public class SingleToast {

    private static Toast mToast;

    public static void show(Context context, String text, int duration) {
        if (mToast != null) mToast.cancel();
        mToast = Toast.makeText(context, text, duration);
        mToast.show();
    }
}

and use it in your code like so:

SingleToast.show(this, "Hello World", Toast.LENGTH_LONG);

//

1
  • 5
    The SingleToast solution works, but it has a memory issue. It retains context for the lifetime of mToast which can way exceed the would-be lifetime of context. One should use context.getApplicationContext() instead to avoid a memory leak.
    – Aleks N.
    Commented Oct 26, 2016 at 14:07
2

In Kotlin I use this:

private lateinit var toast: Toast

fun showToast(@StringRes stringId: Int, toastLength: Int = Toast.LENGTH_SHORT)
{
    if (this::toast.isInitialized)
    {
        toast.cancel()
    }

    toast = Toast.makeText(
        requireContext(),
        getString(stringId),
        toastLength
    )

    toast.show()
}

Or when using it in many fragments it is possible to extend the Fragment class, so function showToast doesn't have to be in every fragment.

open class OneToastFragment : Fragment()
{
    private lateinit var toast: Toast

    fun showToast(@StringRes stringId: Int, toastLength: Int = Toast.LENGTH_SHORT)
    {
        if (this::toast.isInitialized)
        {
            toast.cancel()
        }

        toast = Toast.makeText(
            requireContext(),
            getString(stringId),
            toastLength
        )

        toast.show()
    }
}

Also, it can be easy using Toasty library.

Gradle project:

repositories {
    ...
    maven { url "https://jitpack.io" }
}

Gradle module app:

dependencies {
    ...
    implementation 'com.github.GrenderG:Toasty:1.4.2'
}

onCreate in Activity class:

Toasty.Config.getInstance().allowQueue(false).apply(); // set this to avoid toast acumulations

//Test:
int x = 0;
Toasty.info(this, Integer.toString(x++), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT, true).show();
Toasty.info(this, Integer.toString(x++), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT, true).show();
Toasty.info(this, Integer.toString(x++), Toast.LENGTH_SHORT, true).show();

//This will only show a toast with message `2` 
1

Have only one Toast in this activity.

private Toast toast = null;

Then just check if there's currently a Toast being shown before creating another one.

if (toast == null || !toast.getView().isShown()) {
    if (toast != null) {
        toast.cancel();
    }
    toast = Toast.makeToast("Your text", Toast.LENGTH).show();
}

You can even make that last snippet into a private method showToast(text) to refactor code if you need to display different text messages.

0

This will only make a new toast after a pre-defined delay (3 seconds in this case) irrespective of how many times the user press that button.

Kotlin

var mLastToastTime: Long = 0
val mNewToastInterval: Int = 3000 // milliseconds

if (System.currentTimeMillis() - mLastToastTime > mNewToastInterval) {
    showToast()
    mLastToastTime = System.currentTimeMillis().toInt()
}

Java

int mLastToastTime = 0;
int mNewToastInterval = 3000; // milliseconds

if (System.currentTimeMillis() - mLastToastTime > mNewToastInterval) {
       showToast();
       mLastToastTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.