28

Let's say I have the following (very simple) data structure:

$scope.accounts = [{
   percent: 30,
   name: "Checking"},
 { percent: 70,
   name: "Savings"}];

Then I have the following structure as part of a form:

<div ng-repeat="account in accounts">
    <input type="number" max="100" min="0" ng-model="account.percent" />
    <input type="text" ng-model="account.name" />
</div>

Now, I want to validate that the percents sum to 100 for each set of accounts, but most of the examples I have seen of custom directives only deal with validating an individual value. What is an idiomatic way to create a directive that would validate multiple dependent fields at once? There are a fair amount of solutions for this in jquery, but I haven't been able to find a good source for Angular.

EDIT: I came up with the following custom directive ("share" is a synonym for the original code's "percent"). The share-validate directive takes a map of the form "{group: accounts, id: $index}" as its value.

app.directive('shareValidate', function() {
return {
    restrict: 'A',
    require: 'ngModel',
    link: function(scope, elem, attr, ctrl) {
        ctrl.$parsers.unshift(function(viewValue) {
            params = angular.copy(scope.$eval(attr.shareValidate));
            params.group.splice(params.id, 1);
            var sum = +viewValue;
            angular.forEach(params.group, function(entity, index) {
                sum += +(entity.share);
            });
            ctrl.$setValidity('share', sum === 100);
            return viewValue;
        });
    }
};
});

This ALMOST works, but can't handle the case in which a field is invalidated, but a subsequent change in another field makes it valid again. For example:

Field 1: 61
Field 2: 52

If I take Field 2 down to 39, Field 2 will now be valid, but Field 1 is still invalid. Ideas?

14

Ok, the following works (again, "share" is "percent"):

app.directive('shareValidate', function () {
return {
    restrict: 'A',
    require: 'ngModel',
    link: function(scope, elem, attr, ctrl) {
        scope.$watch(attr.shareValidate, function(newArr, oldArr) {
            var sum = 0;
            angular.forEach(newArr, function(entity, i) {
                sum += entity.share;
            });
            if (sum === 100) {
                ctrl.$setValidity('share', true);
                scope.path.offers.invalidShares = false;
            }
            else {
                ctrl.$setValidity('share', false);
                scope.path.offers.invalidShares = true;
            }
        }, true); //enable deep dirty checking
    }
};
});

In the HTML, set the attribute as "share-validate", and the value to the set of objects you want to watch.

  • 5
    Nice workable solution but I would say it could be improved to make it more generic. I don't think it's a good practice to hardcode scope paths inside a directive. I did something more generic (maybe it will help you in the future): liviutrifoi.wordpress.com/2013/10/19/… – Liviu Trifoi Oct 21 '13 at 20:47
  • 1
    Hi, can you share a working fiddle for the above example, Thanks – Vamsikrishna Jul 11 '17 at 3:06
8

You can check angularui library (ui-utility part). It has ui-validate directive.

One way you can implement it then is

<input type="number" name="accountNo" ng-model="account.percent"
ui-validate="{overflow : 'checkOverflow($value,account)' }">

On the controller create the method checkOverflow that return true or false based on account calculation.

I have not tried this myself but want to share the idea. Read the samples present on the site too.

  • 1
    Ok, I will check that out. Also interested in how to go about building my own custom directive to solve this. – TG-T Sep 8 '13 at 10:55
  • If you build your own directive, you can look at Custom Validation section in the developer guide docs.angularjs.org/guide/forms – Chandermani Sep 8 '13 at 11:04
  • 12
    I don't think ui-validate works here as it also validates only the edited field. Thus, if you enter e.g. 20 in both fields, they are both invalid. If you then change one of them to 80, that field does become valid but the other field still appears invalid. – Tomi Junnila May 23 '14 at 14:02
5

I have a case where I have a dynamic form where I can have a variable number of input fields on my form and I needed to limit the number of input controls that are being added.

I couldn't easily restrict the adding of these input fields since they were generated by a combination of other factors, so I needed to invalidate the form if the number of input fields exceeded the limit. I did this by creating a reference to the form in my controller ctrl.myForm, and then each time the input controls are dynamically generated (in my controller code), I would do the limit check and then set the validity on the form like this: ctrl.myForm.$setValidity("maxCount", false);

This worked well since the validation wasn't determined by a specific input field, but the overall count of my inputs. This same approach could work if you have validation that needs to be done that is determined by the combination of multiple fields.

0

For my sanity

HTML

<form ng-submit="applyDefaultDays()" name="daysForm" ng-controller="DaysCtrl">
<div class="form-group">
    <label for="startDate">Start Date</label>
    <div class="input-group">
        <input id="startDate"
               ng-change="runAllValidators()"
               ng-model="startDate"
               type="text"
               class="form-control"
               name="startDate"
               placeholder="mm/dd/yyyy"
               ng-required
        />
    </div>
</div>
<div class="form-group">
    <label for="eEndDate">End Date</label>
    <div class="input-group">
        <input id="endDate"
               ng-change="runAllValidators()"
               ng-model="endDate"
               type="text"
               class="form-control"
               name="endDate"
               placeholder="mm/dd/yyyy"
               ng-required
        />
    </div>
</div>
<div class="text-right">
    <button ng-disabled="daysForm.$invalid" type="submit" class="btn btn-default">Apply Default Dates</button>
</div>

JS

'use strict';

angular.module('myModule')
  .controller('DaysCtrl', function($scope, $timeout) {
    $scope.initDate = new Date();
    $scope.startDate = angular.copy($scope.initDate);
    $scope.endDate = angular.copy($scope.startDate);
    $scope.endDate.setTime($scope.endDate.getTime() + 6*24*60*60*1000);

    $scope.$watch("daysForm", function(){
      //fields are only populated after controller is initialized
      $timeout(function(){
        //not all viewalues are set yet for somereason, timeout needed
        $scope.daysForm.startDate.$validators.checkAgainst = function(){
          $scope.daysForm.startDate.$setDirty();
          return (new Date($scope.daysForm.startDate.$viewValue)).getTime() <=
            (new Date($scope.daysForm.endDate.$viewValue)).getTime();
        };

        $scope.daysForm.endDate.$validators.checkAgainst = function(){
          $scope.daysForm.endDate.$setDirty();
          return (new Date($scope.daysForm.startDate.$viewValue)).getTime() <=
            (new Date($scope.daysForm.endDate.$viewValue)).getTime();
        };
      });
    });

    $scope.runAllValidators = function(){
      //need to run all validators on change
      $scope.daysForm.startDate.$validate();
      $scope.daysForm.endDate.$validate();
    };

    $scope.applyDefaultDays = function(){
        //do stuff
    }
  });
0

You can define a single directive that is only responsible for this check.

<form>
  <div ng-repeat="account in accounts">
    <input type="number" max="100" min="0" ng-model="account.percent" />
    <input type="text" ng-model="account.name" />
  </div>
  <!-- HERE IT IS -->
  <sum-up-to-hundred accounts="accounts"></sum-up-to-hundred>
</form>

And here's the simple directive's code.

app.directive('sumUpToHundred', function() {
  return {
    scope: {
      accounts: '<'
    },
    require: {
      formCtrl: '^form'
    },
    bindToController: true,
    controllerAs: '$ctrl',
    controller: function() {
      var vm = this;

      vm.$doCheck = function(changes) {
        var sum = vm.accounts.map((a)=> a.percent).reduce((total, n)=> total + n);
        if (sum !== 100) {
          vm.formCtrl.$setValidity('sumuptohundred', false);
        } else {
          vm.formCtrl.$setValidity('sumuptohundred', true);
        }
      };
    }
  };
});

Here's a plunker.

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