41

I have a SQL server table in which there are 2 columns that I want to update either of their values according to a flag sent to the stored procedure along with the new value, something like:

UPDATE
    table_Name

SET
    CASE
        WHEN @flag = '1' THEN column_A += @new_value
        WHEN @flag = '0' THEN column_B += @new_value
    END AS Total

WHERE
    ID = @ID

What is the correct SQL server code to do so??

2
  • Why +=? You are trying to append @new_value to what is in the column already? Commented Sep 8, 2013 at 10:08
  • yes I am, and that's why I need the conditional update code, because depending on the flag I will update the intended column
    – MA9H
    Commented Sep 8, 2013 at 10:10

5 Answers 5

50

Something like this should work:

UPDATE
    table_Name
SET 
  column_A = CASE WHEN @flag = '1' THEN column_A + @new_value ELSE column_A END,
  column_B = CASE WHEN @flag = '0' THEN column_B + @new_value ELSE column_B END
WHERE
    ID = @ID
29

The current answers are fine and should work ok, but what's wrong with the more simple, more obvious, and more maintainable:

IF @flag = 1
    UPDATE table_name SET column_A = column_A + @new_value WHERE ID = @ID;
ELSE
    UPDATE table_name SET column_B = column_B + @new_value WHERE ID = @ID;

This is much easier to read albeit this is a very simple query.

Here's a working example courtesy of @snyder: SqlFiddle.

8
  • @snyder. Thanks, it's just the semicolons. SqlFiddle. Commented Sep 8, 2013 at 10:28
  • @flem - You don't need to remove the semi colons, just change the statement terminator in the right hand panel. sqlfiddle.com/#!3/2ea6e/2 Commented Sep 8, 2013 at 10:35
  • 4
    Actually, I don't really like this answer, you have to write where clause and table name twice and this could be hard to maintain if the whole query is more complex than this simple example Commented Sep 8, 2013 at 12:30
  • 2
    @RomanPekar. That's a fair point and exactly why I wrote "albeit this is a very simple query". The purpose of this answer was to provide an alternate to the others. Unlike third gen programming languages, DRY is not necessarily a best practice in SQL programming. Performance is key here. The OP should consider both options and make an informed choice based on the actual query. Commented Sep 8, 2013 at 13:48
  • 1
    If the number of updates is low and the query is the same for updates to column A and B, then the other answers are fine, but if I was demonstrating my code, I wouldn't feel to good about it. I suspect we're mostly thinking of "programming logic" rather than "set logic" here. I wonder what a real DBD would have to say... Commented Sep 8, 2013 at 13:51
17

Since you're using SQL 2008:

UPDATE
    table_Name

SET
    column_A  
     = CASE
        WHEN @flag = '1' THEN @new_value
        ELSE 0
    END + column_A,

    column_B  
     = CASE
        WHEN @flag = '0' THEN @new_value
        ELSE 0
    END + column_B 
WHERE
    ID = @ID

If you were using SQL 2012:

UPDATE
    table_Name
SET
    column_A  = column_A + IIF(@flag = '1', @new_value, 0),
    column_B  = column_B + IIF(@flag = '0', @new_value, 0)
WHERE
    ID = @ID
7

this worked great:

UPDATE
    table_Name
SET 
  column_A = CASE WHEN @flag = '1' THEN column_A + @new_value ELSE column_A END,
  column_B = CASE WHEN @flag = '0' THEN column_B + @new_value ELSE column_B END
WHERE
    ID = @ID
0
2
DECLARE @JCnt int=null
SEt @JCnt=(SELECT COUNT( ISNUll(EmpCode,0)) FROM tbl_Employees WHERE EmpCode=1  )

UPDATE #TempCode
SET janCA= CASE WHEN @JCnt>0 THEN (SELECT SUM (ISNUll(Amount,0)) FROM tbl_Salary WHERE Code=1 )ELSE 0 END
WHERE code=1

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