41

I've got a numpy array filled mostly with real numbers, but there is a few nan values in it as well.

How can I replace the nans with averages of columns where they are?

67

No loops required:

print(a)
[[ 0.93230948         nan  0.47773439  0.76998063]
 [ 0.94460779  0.87882456  0.79615838  0.56282885]
 [ 0.94272934  0.48615268  0.06196785         nan]
 [ 0.64940216  0.74414127         nan         nan]]

#Obtain mean of columns as you need, nanmean is just convenient.
col_mean = np.nanmean(a, axis=0)
print(col_mean)
[ 0.86726219  0.7030395   0.44528687  0.66640474]

#Find indicies that you need to replace
inds = np.where(np.isnan(a))

#Place column means in the indices. Align the arrays using take
a[inds] = np.take(col_mean, inds[1])

print(a)
[[ 0.93230948  0.7030395   0.47773439  0.76998063]
 [ 0.94460779  0.87882456  0.79615838  0.56282885]
 [ 0.94272934  0.48615268  0.06196785  0.66640474]
 [ 0.64940216  0.74414127  0.44528687  0.66640474]]
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  • Nice answer. I didn't know nanmean existed! (+1) – Hammer Sep 8 '13 at 22:54
  • 4
    any reason you use take instead of just indexing? – Hammer Sep 8 '13 at 22:58
  • 1
    @Hammer They are adding nanmean to numpy in 1.8. Should be interesting. I use take instead of fancy indexing due to this question. There is a lot of evidence that indexing is ~5x slower then take. Plus this works in older versions also. – Daniel Sep 8 '13 at 23:00
  • @Jaime Can you elaborate on that some? – Daniel Sep 8 '13 at 23:10
  • 8
    You can now use numpy.nanmean() instead of import scipy: docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy-dev/reference/generated/… – crypdick May 25 '16 at 21:06
11

Using masked arrays

The standard way to do this using only numpy would be to use the masked array module.

Scipy is a pretty heavy package which relies on external libraries, so it's worth having a numpy-only method. This borrows from @DonaldHobson's answer.

Edit: np.nanmean is now a numpy function. However, it doesn't handle all-nan columns...

Suppose you have an array a:

>>> a
array([[  0.,  nan,  10.,  nan],
       [  1.,   6.,  nan,  nan],
       [  2.,   7.,  12.,  nan],
       [  3.,   8.,  nan,  nan],
       [ nan,   9.,  14.,  nan]])

>>> import numpy.ma as ma
>>> np.where(np.isnan(a), ma.array(a, mask=np.isnan(a)).mean(axis=0), a)    
array([[  0. ,   7.5,  10. ,   0. ],
       [  1. ,   6. ,  12. ,   0. ],
       [  2. ,   7. ,  12. ,   0. ],
       [  3. ,   8. ,  12. ,   0. ],
       [  1.5,   9. ,  14. ,   0. ]])

Note that the masked array's mean does not need to be the same shape as a, because we're taking advantage of the implicit broadcasting over rows.

Also note how the all-nan column is nicely handled. The mean is zero since you're taking the mean of zero elements. The method using nanmean doesn't handle all-nan columns:

>>> col_mean = np.nanmean(a, axis=0)
/home/praveen/.virtualenvs/numpy3-mkl/lib/python3.4/site-packages/numpy/lib/nanfunctions.py:675: RuntimeWarning: Mean of empty slice
  warnings.warn("Mean of empty slice", RuntimeWarning)
>>> inds = np.where(np.isnan(a))
>>> a[inds] = np.take(col_mean, inds[1])
>>> a
array([[  0. ,   7.5,  10. ,   nan],
       [  1. ,   6. ,  12. ,   nan],
       [  2. ,   7. ,  12. ,   nan],
       [  3. ,   8. ,  12. ,   nan],
       [  1.5,   9. ,  14. ,   nan]])

Explanation

Converting a into a masked array gives you

>>> ma.array(a, mask=np.isnan(a))
masked_array(data =
 [[0.0 --  10.0 --]
  [1.0 6.0 --   --]
  [2.0 7.0 12.0 --]
  [3.0 8.0 --   --]
  [--  9.0 14.0 --]],
             mask =
 [[False  True False  True]
 [False False  True  True]
 [False False False  True]
 [False False  True  True]
 [ True False False  True]],
       fill_value = 1e+20)

And taking the mean over columns gives you the correct answer, normalizing only over the non-masked values:

>>> ma.array(a, mask=np.isnan(a)).mean(axis=0)
masked_array(data = [1.5 7.5 12.0 --],
             mask = [False False False  True],
       fill_value = 1e+20)

Further, note how the mask nicely handles the column which is all-nan!

Finally, np.where does the job of replacement.


Row-wise mean

To replace nan values with row-wise mean instead of column-wise mean requires a tiny change for broadcasting to take effect nicely:

>>> a
array([[  0.,   1.,   2.,   3.,  nan],
       [ nan,   6.,   7.,   8.,   9.],
       [ 10.,  nan,  12.,  nan,  14.],
       [ nan,  nan,  nan,  nan,  nan]])

>>> np.where(np.isnan(a), ma.array(a, mask=np.isnan(a)).mean(axis=1), a)
ValueError: operands could not be broadcast together with shapes (4,5) (4,) (4,5)

>>> np.where(np.isnan(a), ma.array(a, mask=np.isnan(a)).mean(axis=1)[:, np.newaxis], a)
array([[  0. ,   1. ,   2. ,   3. ,   1.5],
       [  7.5,   6. ,   7. ,   8. ,   9. ],
       [ 10. ,  12. ,  12. ,  12. ,  14. ],
       [  0. ,   0. ,   0. ,   0. ,   0. ]])
|improve this answer|||||
  • IMO there's nothing wrong with having np.nan values as means for all-NaN column case. But it is indeed a neat case of use for masked arrays. – Vlas Sokolov Oct 24 '16 at 0:39
  • @VlasSokolov Well, having a mask is even better I think. i.e., making a into a masked array and keeping it masked even after applying the mean. Then you don't need to worry about performing operations on it, which might cause the nans to "spread" to the non-nan values. – Praveen Oct 24 '16 at 0:44
5

If partial is your original data, and replace is an array of the same shape containing averaged values then this code will use the value from partial if one exists.

Complete= np.where(np.isnan(partial),replace,partial)
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  • This is a much, much cleaner solution than any of the others presented. – naught101 Sep 6 '16 at 0:55
  • Except that it requires more memory, to hold the repeated mean values. – Benjamin Dec 19 '16 at 15:56
4

Alternative: Replacing NaNs with interpolation of columns.

def interpolate_nans(X):
    """Overwrite NaNs with column value interpolations."""
    for j in range(X.shape[1]):
        mask_j = np.isnan(X[:,j])
        X[mask_j,j] = np.interp(np.flatnonzero(mask_j), np.flatnonzero(~mask_j), X[~mask_j,j])
    return X

Example use:

X_incomplete = np.array([[10,     20,     30    ],
                         [np.nan, 30,     np.nan],
                         [np.nan, np.nan, 50    ],
                         [40,     50,     np.nan    ]])

X_complete = interpolate_nans(X_incomplete)

print X_complete
[[10,     20,     30    ],
 [20,     30,     40    ],
 [30,     40,     50    ],
 [40,     50,     50    ]]

I use this bit of code for time series data in particular, where columns are attributes and rows are time-ordered samples.

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2

This isn't very clean but I can't think of a way to do it other than iterating

#example
a = np.arange(16, dtype = float).reshape(4,4)
a[2,2] = np.nan
a[3,3] = np.nan

indices = np.where(np.isnan(a)) #returns an array of rows and column indices
for row, col in zip(*indices):
    a[row,col] = np.mean(a[~np.isnan(a[:,col]), col])
|improve this answer|||||
  • Thanks a lot for this! – piokuc Sep 8 '13 at 23:14
1

To extend Donald's Answer I provide a minimal example. Let's say a is an ndarray and we want to replace its zero values with the mean of the column.

In [231]: a
Out[231]: 
array([[0, 3, 6],
       [2, 0, 0]])


In [232]: col_mean = np.nanmean(a, axis=0)
Out[232]: array([ 1. ,  1.5,  3. ])

In [228]: np.where(np.equal(a, 0), col_mean, a)
Out[228]: 
array([[ 1. ,  3. ,  6. ],
       [ 2. ,  1.5,  3. ]])
|improve this answer|||||
0

Using simple functions with loops:

a=[[0.93230948, np.nan, 0.47773439, 0.76998063],
  [0.94460779, 0.87882456, 0.79615838, 0.56282885],
  [0.94272934, 0.48615268, 0.06196785, np.nan],
  [0.64940216, 0.74414127, np.nan, np.nan],
  [0.64940216, 0.74414127, np.nan, np.nan]]

print("------- original array -----")
for aa in a:
    print(aa)

# GET COLUMN MEANS: 
ta = np.array(a).T.tolist()                         # transpose the array; 
col_means = list(map(lambda x: np.nanmean(x), ta))  # get means; 
print("column means:", col_means)

# REPLACE NAN ENTRIES WITH COLUMN MEANS: 
nrows = len(a); ncols = len(a[0]) # get number of rows & columns; 
for r in range(nrows):
    for c in range(ncols):
        if np.isnan(a[r][c]):
            a[r][c] = col_means[c]

print("------- means added -----")
for aa in a:
    print(aa)

Output:

------- original array -----
[0.93230948, nan, 0.47773439, 0.76998063]
[0.94460779, 0.87882456, 0.79615838, 0.56282885]
[0.94272934, 0.48615268, 0.06196785, nan]
[0.64940216, 0.74414127, nan, nan]
[0.64940216, 0.74414127, nan, nan]

column means: [0.82369018599999999, 0.71331494500000003, 0.44528687333333333, 0.66640474000000005]

------- means added -----
[0.93230948, 0.71331494500000003, 0.47773439, 0.76998063]
[0.94460779, 0.87882456, 0.79615838, 0.56282885]
[0.94272934, 0.48615268, 0.06196785, 0.66640474000000005]
[0.64940216, 0.74414127, 0.44528687333333333, 0.66640474000000005]
[0.64940216, 0.74414127, 0.44528687333333333, 0.66640474000000005]

The for loops can also be written with list comprehension:

new_a = [[col_means[c] if np.isnan(a[r][c]) else a[r][c] 
            for c in range(ncols) ]
        for r in range(nrows) ]
|improve this answer|||||
-2

you might want to try this built-in function:

x = np.array([np.inf, -np.inf, np.nan, -128, 128])
np.nan_to_num(x)
array([  1.79769313e+308,  -1.79769313e+308,   0.00000000e+000,
-1.28000000e+002,   1.28000000e+002])
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