306

How can i convert an array like this to object?

    [128] => Array
        (
            [status] => Figure A.
 Facebook's horizontal scrollbars showing up on a 1024x768 screen resolution.
        )

    [129] => Array
        (
            [status] => The other day at work, I had some spare time
        )

)
  • 4
    What kind of object do you want to get, precisely ? What I mean is : what should be the attributes ? – Pascal MARTIN Dec 8 '09 at 18:58
  • $object->status like that – streetparade Dec 8 '09 at 18:59
  • in a loop it should both because status is one data array so both are printet – streetparade Dec 8 '09 at 19:08
  • not sure from when, but this just works: $a = (object)['hello' => 'world']; – Nishchal Gautam Nov 5 '16 at 11:44

33 Answers 33

493

In the simplest case, it's probably sufficient to "cast" the array as an object:

$object = (object) $array;

Another option would be to instantiate a standard class as a variable, and loop through your array while re-assigning the values:

$object = new stdClass();
foreach ($array as $key => $value)
{
    $object->$key = $value;
}

As Edson Medina pointed out, a really clean solution is to use the built-in json_ functions:

$object = json_decode(json_encode($array), FALSE);

This also (recursively) converts all of your sub arrays into objects, which you may or may not want. Unfortunately it has a 2-3x performance hit over the looping approach.

Warning! (thanks to Ultra for the comment):

json_decode on different enviroments converts UTF-8 data in different ways. I end up getting on of values '240.00' locally and '240' on production - massive dissaster. Morover if conversion fails string get's returned as NULL

  • 37
    "as variables cannot start with numbers", yes they can: $object->{3} = 'xyz'; – chelmertz Dec 10 '09 at 8:54
  • 8
    "has a 2-3x performance hit" Which is an unfair comparison, as the latter method returns recursive objects, while the looping approach without further conditions (as in the answer of @streetparade) only converts the first level. – feeela May 13 '13 at 13:07
  • 6
    @feeela I don't think it's unfair at all.. i did mention that it does the conversion recursively. Also, the 2-3x performance hit was arrived at using an flat input array (which wouldn't use any recursion) – jlb May 13 '13 at 14:15
  • 6
    WARNING! json_decode on different enviroments converts UTF-8 data in different ways. I end up getting on of values '240.00' locally and '240' on production - massive dissaster. Morover if conversion fails string get's returned as NULL – Szymon Toda Nov 5 '14 at 15:34
  • 1
    Note when using the json_* functions: references (e.g. to other arrays) stored in the original array will be duplicated in this case. Say the key x in the array holds a reference to another array. Then $object->x after execution of your one-liner will be a duplicate of $array['x'], not any more a reference to the original array. This might be harmless in some applications, but for large arrays it wastes memory and might mess up execution if the reference is being used later on. – The Coprolal Dec 13 '18 at 14:49
146

you can simply use type casting to convert an array to object.

// *convert array to object* Array([id]=> 321313[username]=>shahbaz)
$object = (object) $array_name;

//now it is converted to object and you can access it.
echo $object->username;
  • 29
    Doesn't work recursively. – DanMan Mar 11 '15 at 12:25
97

Quick hack:

// assuming $var is a multidimensional array
$obj = json_decode (json_encode ($var), FALSE);

Not pretty, but works.

  • 2
    I actually love this solution, using built in functions instead of user-defined is always quicker, and this one works great. Thanks for the tip. – aknatn May 26 '12 at 20:17
  • clever. i wonder the what performance is like on this guy – jlb Feb 12 '13 at 10:25
  • @Oddant This solves the problem mentioned above (convert an array into an object). Your rant should be directed into the main post, not my solution. – Edson Medina May 29 '13 at 8:45
  • 1
    @Oddant, to be fair to @EdsonMedina, the original question does not specify what visibility the attributes need, and since OP does not use $this in the comments that follow as the accessor it is heavily implied he/she desires a stdClass instance as output and not a user-defined class such as your answer uses. I agree on the elegance of this solution but unfortunately it's a pretty commonly employed pattern to solve this problem with nested arrays where casting to object won't work. It's also possible that OP is using an interface that requires and object as input and not an array. – DeaconDesperado Jun 19 '13 at 19:49
  • 3
    Don't forget that using this way you will lose all but the basic types. DateTime will be converter stdObject for example. – Denis Pshenov Nov 4 '14 at 17:33
94

Here are three ways:

  1. Fake a real object:

    class convert
    {
        public $varible;
    
        public function __construct($array)
        {
            $this = $array;
        }
    
        public static function toObject($array)
        {
            $array = new convert($array);
            return $array;
        }
    }
    
  2. Convert the array into an object by casting it to an object:

    $array = array(
        // ...
    );
    $object = (object) $array;
    
  3. Manually convert the array into an object:

    $object = object;
    foreach ($arr as $key => $value) {
        $object->{$key} = $value;
    }
    
  • 2
    hmm thanks but your face class gives the following error Fatal error: Cannot re-assign $this in /var/www/bot/inc/twitter-bot.php on line 10 – streetparade Dec 8 '09 at 19:52
  • 1
    and typcasint @ reference isnt a good idea even it wouldnt work here is what i got unexpected T_OBJECT_CAST, expecting T_NEW or T_STRING or T_VARIABLE or '$' – streetparade Dec 8 '09 at 19:59
  • 2
    $array =& (object) $array == nice KISS implementation ! – mate64 Dec 30 '11 at 16:52
  • 16
    Why would anyone want to use a different method than 2)? Are there any downsides? – Yogu Feb 27 '14 at 17:49
  • 7
    typecasting an array into object doesnt work on nested arrays – minhajul Nov 23 '15 at 9:33
87

The easy way would be

$object = (object)$array;

But that's not what you want. If you want objects you want to achieve something, but that's missing in this question. Using objects just for the reason of using objects makes no sense.

  • 2
    doesnt work, i did that before i asked the question here so there must be another way to doit – streetparade Dec 8 '09 at 19:00
  • 18
    Why does he have to give his reason for wanting to use objects? I don't think that's relevant to how it's done. Maybe he needs to json_encode them, or serialize them? There could be dozens of reasons to do this. – zombat Dec 8 '09 at 19:06
  • hmm.. i looked at the browser output it looks like this object(stdClass)#150 (130) { [0]=> array(1) { ["status"]=> string(130) "At long last Mac and Linux users don't have to feel like second class citizens in Chrome land: they've got official beta versio…" } officialy that is an object but how to iterate throw this that i can acces status like $obj->status any idea? – streetparade Dec 8 '09 at 19:06
  • zombat, JSON encode is no reason for using an object, there is a flag to json_encode() to use objects. with serialize one would need a specific object type expected by the receiver. And in general I try to help with the actual problem. for me this question implies that there is an architectural mistake somewhere else. – johannes Dec 8 '09 at 19:15
  • Very good and easy! – SaidbakR Jul 6 '18 at 23:41
30

Its way to simple, This will create an object for recursive arrays as well:

$object = json_decode(json_encode((object) $yourArray), FALSE);
  • 3
    passing false to json_decode() will return an associative array. – Rust Oct 25 '16 at 8:23
  • 2
    @user3284463 Passing true to json_decode will return an associative array, false is the default and will return an StdClass instance. – Elliot Reed Sep 11 '18 at 17:54
23

Depending on where you need that and how to access the object there are different ways to do it.

For example: just typecast it

$object =  (object) $yourArray;

However, the most compatible one is using a utility method (not yet part of PHP) that implements standard PHP casting based on a string that specifies the type (or by ignoring it just de-referencing the value):

/**
 * dereference a value and optionally setting its type
 *
 * @param mixed $mixed
 * @param null  $type (optional)
 *
 * @return mixed $mixed set as $type
 */
function rettype($mixed, $type = NULL) {
    $type === NULL || settype($mixed, $type);
    return $mixed;
}

The usage example in your case (Online Demo):

$yourArray = Array('status' => 'Figure A. ...');

echo rettype($yourArray, 'object')->status; // prints "Figure A. ..."
  • 1
    Where are the upvotes for this one? ;-o – Sz. Jul 27 '15 at 9:20
15

There's no built-in method to do it as far as I'm aware, but it's as easy as a simple loop:

    $obj= new stdClass();

    foreach ($array as $k=> $v) {
        $obj->{$k} = $v;
    }

You can expound on that if you need it to build your object recursively.

15

This one worked for me

  function array_to_obj($array, &$obj)
  {
    foreach ($array as $key => $value)
    {
      if (is_array($value))
      {
      $obj->$key = new stdClass();
      array_to_obj($value, $obj->$key);
      }
      else
      {
        $obj->$key = $value;
      }
    }
  return $obj;
  }

function arrayToObject($array)
{
 $object= new stdClass();
 return array_to_obj($array,$object);
}

usage :

$myobject = arrayToObject($array);
print_r($myobject);

returns :

    [127] => stdClass Object
        (
            [status] => Have you ever created a really great looking website design
        )

    [128] => stdClass Object
        (
            [status] => Figure A.
 Facebook's horizontal scrollbars showing up on a 1024x768 screen resolution.
        )

    [129] => stdClass Object
        (
            [status] => The other day at work, I had some spare time
        )

like usual you can loop it like:

foreach($myobject as $obj)
{
  echo $obj->status;
}
  • But this one is around 500% slower (tested) than type casting: $obj = (object) $array; – xZero Jul 13 '17 at 9:18
  • @xZero but $obj = (object) $array; does not work for multidimensional arrays. – Jeff Puckett Nov 22 '17 at 14:41
8

Actually if you want to use this with multi-dimensional arrays you would want to use some recursion.

static public function array_to_object(array $array)
{
    foreach($array as $key => $value)
    {
        if(is_array($value))
        {
            $array[$key] = self::array_to_object($value);
        }
    }
    return (object)$array;
}
6

I would definitly go with a clean way like this :

<?php

class Person {

  private $name;
  private $age;
  private $sexe;

  function __construct ($payload)
  {
     if (is_array($payload))
          $this->from_array($payload);
  }


  public function from_array($array)
  {
     foreach(get_object_vars($this) as $attrName => $attrValue)
        $this->{$attrName} = $array[$attrName];
  }

  public function say_hi ()
  {
     print "hi my name is {$this->name}";
  }
}

print_r($_POST);
$mike = new Person($_POST);
$mike->say_hi();

?>

if you submit:

formulaire

you will get this:

mike

I found this more logical comparing the above answers from Objects should be used for the purpose they've been made for (encapsulated cute little objects).

Also using get_object_vars ensure that no extra attributes are created in the manipulated Object (you don't want a car having a family name, nor a person behaving 4 wheels).

  • Why don't you use $attr_value instead of $array[$attr_name]; in yourpublic function from_array($array) function – Sakkeer Hussain Apr 8 '15 at 17:13
5

You could also use an ArrayObject, for example:

<?php
    $arr = array("test",
                 array("one"=>1,"two"=>2,"three"=>3), 
                 array("one"=>1,"two"=>2,"three"=>3)
           );
    $o = new ArrayObject($arr);
    echo $o->offsetGet(2)["two"],"\n";
    foreach ($o as $key=>$val){
        if (is_array($val)) {
            foreach($val as $k => $v) {
               echo $k . ' => ' . $v,"\n";
            }
        }
        else
        {
               echo $val,"\n";
        }
    }
?>

//Output:
  2
  test
  one => 1
  two => 2
  three => 3
  one => 1
  two => 2
  three => 3
5

recursion is your friend:

function __toObject(Array $arr) {
    $obj = new stdClass();
    foreach($arr as $key=>$val) {
        if (is_array($val)) {
            $val = __toObject($val);
        }
        $obj->$key = $val;
    }

    return $obj;
}
5

The one I use (it is a class member):

const MAX_LEVEL = 5; // change it as needed

public function arrayToObject($a, $level=0)
{

    if(!is_array($a)) {
        throw new InvalidArgumentException(sprintf('Type %s cannot be cast, array expected', gettype($a)));
    }

    if($level > self::MAX_LEVEL) {
        throw new OverflowException(sprintf('%s stack overflow: %d exceeds max recursion level', __METHOD__, $level));
    }

    $o = new stdClass();
    foreach($a as $key => $value) {
        if(is_array($value)) { // convert value recursively
            $value = $this->arrayToObject($value, $level+1);
        }
        $o->{$key} = $value;
    }
    return $o;
}
5

Little complicated but easy to extend technique:

Suppose you have an array

$a = [
     'name' => 'ankit',
     'age' => '33',
     'dob' => '1984-04-12'
];

Suppose you have have a Person class which may have more or less attributes from this array. for example

class Person 
{
    private $name;
    private $dob;
    private $age;
    private $company;
    private $city;
}

If you still wanna change your array to the person object. You can use ArrayIterator Class.

$arrayIterator = new \ArrayIterator($a); // Pass your array in the argument.

Now you have iterator object.

Create a class extending FilterIterator Class; where you have to define the abstract method accept. Follow the example

class PersonIterator extends \FilterIterator
{
    public function accept()
    {
        return property_exists('Person', parent::current());
    }
}

The above impelmentation will bind the property only if it exists in the class.

Add one more method in the class PersonIterator

public function getObject(Person $object)
{
        foreach ($this as $key => $value)
        {
            $object->{'set' . underscoreToCamelCase($key)}($value);
        }
        return $object;
}

Make sure you have mutators defined in your class. Now you are ready to call these function where you want to create object.

$arrayiterator = new \ArrayIterator($a);
$personIterator = new \PersonIterator($arrayiterator);

$personIterator->getObject(); // this will return your Person Object. 
4

Easy:

$object = json_decode(json_encode($array));

Example:

$array = array(
    'key' => array(
        'k' => 'value',
    ),
    'group' => array('a', 'b', 'c')
);

$object = json_decode(json_encode($array));

Then, the following is true:

$object->key->k === 'value';
$object->group === array('a', 'b', 'c')
  • 1
    I think this is a workaround. Why encode an array to json and then decode it? Its not an optimal decision to me. – Julian May 29 '15 at 8:32
  • 1
    @Julian, because it works recursively, does it in a properly defined and sufficiently reliable ("standard") way, and is also fast enough to be a good alternative to random hand-coded monkey magic. – Sz. Jul 27 '15 at 9:24
4

use this function that i've made:

function buildObject($class,$data){
    $object = new $class;
    foreach($data as $key=>$value){
        if(property_exists($class,$key)){
            $object->{'set'.ucfirst($key)}($value);
        }
    }
    return $object;
}

Usage:

$myObject = buildObject('MyClassName',$myArray);
  • not efficient enough... – c9s Feb 17 '17 at 1:07
4

This requires PHP7 because I chose to use a lambda function to lock away the 'innerfunc' within the main function. The lambda function is called recursively, hence the need for: "use ( &$innerfunc )". You could do it in PHP5 but could not hide the innerfunc.

function convertArray2Object($defs) {
    $innerfunc = function ($a) use ( &$innerfunc ) {
       return (is_array($a)) ? (object) array_map($innerfunc, $a) : $a; 
    };
    return (object) array_map($innerfunc, $defs);
}
2

You could also do this by adding (object) on left of variable to create a new object.

<?php
$a = Array
    ( 'status' => " text" );
var_dump($a);
$b = (object)$a;
var_dump($b);
var_dump($b->status);

http://codepad.org/9YmD1KsU

2

Using json_encode is problematic because of the way that it handles non UTF-8 data. It's worth noting that the json_encode/json_encode method also leaves non-associative arrays as arrays. This may or may not be what you want. I was recently in the position of needing to recreate the functionality of this solution but without using json_ functions. Here's what I came up with:

/**
 * Returns true if the array has only integer keys
 */
function isArrayAssociative(array $array) {
    return (bool)count(array_filter(array_keys($array), 'is_string'));
}

/**
 * Converts an array to an object, but leaves non-associative arrays as arrays. 
 * This is the same logic that `json_decode(json_encode($arr), false)` uses.
 */
function arrayToObject(array $array, $maxDepth = 10) {
    if($maxDepth == 0) {
        return $array;
    }

    if(isArrayAssociative($array)) {
        $newObject = new \stdClass;
        foreach ($array as $key => $value) {
            if(is_array($value)) {
                $newObject->{$key} = arrayToObject($value, $maxDepth - 1);
            } else {
                $newObject->{$key} = $value;
            }
        }
        return $newObject;
    } else {

        $newArray = array();
        foreach ($array as $value) {
            if(is_array($value)) {
                $newArray[] = arrayToObject($value, $maxDepth - 1);
            } else {
                $newArray[] = $value;
            }                
        }
        return $newArray;
    }
}
2

Best Method in the WORLD :)

function arrayToObject($conArray)
{
    if(is_array($conArray)){
        /*
        * Return array converted to object
        * Using __FUNCTION__ (Magic constant)
        * for recursive call
        */
        return (object) array_map(__FUNCTION__, $conArray);
    }else{
        // Return object
        return $conArray;
    }
}

if you use different methods you will have problems. This is the best method. You have ever seen.

2

one liner

$object= json_decode(json_encode($result_array, JSON_FORCE_OBJECT));
  • Note that references (e.g. to other arrays) stored in the original array will be duplicated by this one-liner. Say the key x in the array holds a reference to another array. Then $object->x after execution of your one-liner will be a duplicate of $result_array['x'], not the identical array. – The Coprolal Dec 13 '18 at 14:44
2

You can use the (object) function to convert your array into an object.

$arr= [128=> ['status'=>
                 'Figure A. Facebook \'s horizontal scrollbars showing up on a 1024x768 screen resolution.'],
                  129=>['status'=>'The other day at work, I had some spare time']];

            $ArrToObject=(object)$arr;
            var_dump($ArrToObject);

The result will be an object that contains arrays:

object(stdClass)#1048 (2) { [128]=> array(1) {

["status"]=> string(87) "Figure A. Facebook 's horizontal scrollbars showing up on a 1024x768 screen resolution." }

[129]=> array(1) { ["status"]=> string(44) "The other day at work, I had some spare time" } }

1

CakePHP has a recursive Set::map class that basically maps an array into an object. You may need to change what the array looks like in order to make the object look the way you want it.

http://api.cakephp.org/view_source/set/#line-158

Worst case, you may be able to get a few ideas from this function.

1

Obviously just an extrapolation of some other folks' answers, but here's the recursive function that will convert any mulch-dimensional array into an object:

   function convert_array_to_object($array){
      $obj= new stdClass();
      foreach ($array as $k=> $v) {
         if (is_array($v)){
            $v = convert_array_to_object($v);   
         }
         $obj->{strtolower($k)} = $v;
      }
      return $obj;
   }

And remember that if the array had numeric keys they can still be referenced in the resulting object by using {} (for instance: $obj->prop->{4}->prop)

1

Inspired by all these codes, i tried to create a enhanced version with support to: specific class name, avoid constructor method, 'beans' pattern and strict mode (set only existing properties):

    class Util {

static function arrayToObject($array, $class = 'stdClass', $strict = false) {
        if (!is_array($array)) {
            return $array;
        }

        //create an instance of an class without calling class's constructor
        $object = unserialize(
                sprintf(
                        'O:%d:"%s":0:{}', strlen($class), $class
                )
        );

        if (is_array($array) && count($array) > 0) {
            foreach ($array as $name => $value) {
                $name = strtolower(trim($name));
                if (!empty($name)) {

                    if(method_exists($object, 'set'.$name)){
                        $object->{'set'.$name}(Util::arrayToObject($value));
                    }else{
                        if(($strict)){

                            if(property_exists($class, $name)){

                                $object->$name = Util::arrayToObject($value); 

                            }

                        }else{
                            $object->$name = Util::arrayToObject($value); 
                        }

                    }

                }
            }
            return $object;
        } else {
            return FALSE;
        }
        }
}
1

Code

This function works as same as json_decode(json_encode($arr), false).

function arrayToObject(array $arr)
{
    $flat = array_keys($arr) === range(0, count($arr) - 1);
    $out = $flat ? [] : new \stdClass();

    foreach ($arr as $key => $value) {
        $temp = is_array($value) ? $this->arrayToObject($value) : $value;

        if ($flat) {
            $out[] = $temp;
        } else {
            $out->{$key} = $temp;
        }
    }

    return $out;
}

Testing

Test 1: Flat array

$arr = ["a", "b", "c"];
var_export(json_decode(json_encode($arr)));
var_export($this->arrayToObject($arr));

Output:

array(
    0 => 'a',
    1 => 'b',
    2 => 'c',
)
array(
    0 => 'a',
    1 => 'b',
    2 => 'c',
)

Test 2: Array of objects

$arr = [["a" => 1], ["a" => 1], ["a" => 1]];
var_export(json_decode(json_encode($arr)));
var_export($this->arrayToObject($arr));

Output:

array(
    0 => stdClass::__set_state(array('a' => 1,)),
    1 => stdClass::__set_state(array('a' => 1,)),
    2 => stdClass::__set_state(array('a' => 1,)),
)
array(
    0 => stdClass::__set_state(array('a' => 1,)),
    1 => stdClass::__set_state(array('a' => 1,)),
    2 => stdClass::__set_state(array('a' => 1,)),
)

Test 3: Object

$arr = ["a" => 1];
var_export(json_decode($arr));
var_export($this->arrayToObject($arr));

Output:

stdClass::__set_state(array('a' => 1,))
stdClass::__set_state(array('a' => 1,))
0

i have done it with quite simple way,

    $list_years         = array();
    $object             = new stdClass();

    $object->year_id   = 1 ;
    $object->year_name = 2001 ;
    $list_years[]       = $object;
0
function object_to_array($data)
{
    if (is_array($data) || is_object($data))
    {
        $result = array();
        foreach ($data as $key => $value)
        {
            $result[$key] = object_to_array($value);
        }
        return $result;
    }
    return $data;
}

function array_to_object($data)
{
    if (is_array($data) || is_object($data))
    {
        $result= new stdClass();
        foreach ($data as $key => $value)
        {
            $result->$key = array_to_object($value);
        }
        return $result;
    }
    return $data;
}
0

By using (array) and (object) as prefix, you can simply convert object array to standard array and vice-verse

<?php
//defining an array
$a = array('a'=>'1','b'=>'2','c'=>'3','d'=>'4');

//defining an object array
$obj = new stdClass();
$obj->a = '1';
$obj->b = '2';
$obj->c = '3';
$obj->d = '4';

print_r($a);echo '<br>';
print_r($obj);echo '<br>';

//converting object array to array
$b = (array) $obj;
print_r($b);echo '<br>';

//converting array to object
$c = (object) $a;
print_r($c);echo '<br>';
?>

protected by Samuel Liew Oct 24 '18 at 23:39

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