73

Given this code block

map[string]int {"hello":10, "foo":20, "bar":20}

I would like to print out

foo, 20
bar, 20
hello, 10

In the order of highest to lowest

Thanks!

82

Found the answer on Golang-nuts by Andrew Gerrand

You can implement the sort interface by writing the len/less/swap functions

func rankByWordCount(wordFrequencies map[string]int) PairList{
  pl := make(PairList, len(wordFrequencies))
  i := 0
  for k, v := range wordFrequencies {
    pl[i] = Pair{k, v}
    i++
  }
  sort.Sort(sort.Reverse(pl))
  return pl
}

type Pair struct {
  Key string
  Value int
}

type PairList []Pair

func (p PairList) Len() int { return len(p) }
func (p PairList) Less(i, j int) bool { return p[i].Value < p[j].Value }
func (p PairList) Swap(i, j int){ p[i], p[j] = p[j], p[i] }

For the original post, please find it here https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/golang-nuts/FT7cjmcL7gw

  • 1
    ... except Less is returning the wrong result. For reverse sort, use >. – Fred Foo Sep 9 '13 at 9:59
  • 3
    @larsmans My bad! Thanks for pointing it out. I have instead used sort.Reverse to get the reverse results – samol Sep 9 '13 at 10:23
  • 1
    Even better, I didn't even know about sort.Reverse. +1. – Fred Foo Sep 9 '13 at 10:50
58

There's a new sort.Slice function in go 1.8, so now this is simpler.

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sort"
)

func main() {
    m := map[string]int{
        "something": 10,
        "yo":        20,
        "blah":      20,
    }

    type kv struct {
        Key   string
        Value int
    }

    var ss []kv
    for k, v := range m {
        ss = append(ss, kv{k, v})
    }

    sort.Slice(ss, func(i, j int) bool {
        return ss[i].Value > ss[j].Value
    })

    for _, kv := range ss {
        fmt.Printf("%s, %d\n", kv.Key, kv.Value)
    }
}

https://play.golang.org/p/y1_WBENH4N

  • I don't like how the output isn't the map I began with – hendry Apr 1 '19 at 7:07
  • @hendry this answer is specifically in response to the format in the original question. In go1.12 you can just print the map and it'll be sorted, see the issue: github.com/golang/go/issues/21095 – voutasaurus Apr 2 '19 at 14:39
16

For example:

package main

import (
        "fmt"
        "sort"
)

func main() {
        m := map[string]int{"hello": 10, "foo": 20, "bar": 20}
        n := map[int][]string{}
        var a []int
        for k, v := range m {
                n[v] = append(n[v], k)
        }
        for k := range n {
                a = append(a, k)
        }
        sort.Sort(sort.Reverse(sort.IntSlice(a)))
        for _, k := range a {
                for _, s := range n[k] {
                        fmt.Printf("%s, %d\n", s, k)
                }
        }
}

Playground


Output:

foo, 20
bar, 20
hello, 10
  • @DarshanComputing: Thanks, fixed. – zzzz Sep 9 '13 at 10:17
  • 1
    This assumes that the values don't have identities. – newacct Sep 10 '13 at 1:44
  • 1
    @newacct: It solves only the OP problem, not the general case ;-) – zzzz Sep 10 '13 at 7:38
  • this solution is the one that worked for my case as well, simple to understand. – Tommy Jul 30 '19 at 18:46
-2

Sort keys first by value and then iterate map:

package main

import (
    "fmt"
    "sort"
)

func main() {
    counts := map[string]int{"hello": 10, "foo": 20, "bar": 20}

    keys := make([]string, 0, len(counts))
    for key := range counts {
        keys = append(keys, key)
    }
    sort.Slice(keys, func(i, j int) bool { return counts[keys[i]] > counts[keys[j]] })

    for _, key := range keys {
        fmt.Printf("%s, %d\n", key, counts[key])
    }
}
-2

Found a very simple answer on your basic : https://yourbasic.org/golang/sort-map-keys-values/

The logic is :

  1. Put the keys in a slice
  2. Use sort
  3. Iterate over map with ordered keys slice

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.