0

Is it guaranteed that the only way to make changes on a remote Git server is the git push command?

  • Why don't you want to use push? – Mat Sep 9 '13 at 13:59
  • @Mat, I only want to be sure, that my action not makes changes on server! :) – toodef Sep 9 '13 at 14:03
  • It would be better to ask if a specific command can affect the server. It's hard to prove a negative. – chepner Sep 9 '13 at 14:15
  • @toodef, did you mean to say: "Is it guaranteed that the only way make changes on a remote Git server is the git push command"? – Levi Haskell Sep 9 '13 at 14:47
  • @LeviHaskell, Yes, thanks! – toodef Sep 9 '13 at 14:56
7

No, there is also git send-pack as far as I know. Could be more.

3

Well, you could always go to the server side and do a git pull.

2

Depends.

  1. If you want your commits to just not end up in the master branch you should create a new one and push that. That thing is then effectively a feature-branch that most people not working on that feature will disregard.

    git checkout -b feature-X
    git commit...
    git push origin feature-X
    

    This is probably the solution you're after.

  2. If you want your commits to "end up somewhere" but not in any of your remote branches you could push that branch and delete it afterwards:

    git checkout -b feature-X
    git commit...
    git push origin feature-X
    git push origin feature-X -d
    

    Now your commits are "somewhere on the server" but are somewhat hidden from the other users. Next time the garbage collector runs, those commits will disappear completely.

    Needless to say, this solution is kind of stupid and not really helpful.

Either way, git push is the only solution.

0

No, git push is the solution which uses git send-pack within.

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