40

So WPF windows only have four resize mode options: NoResize, CanMinimize, CanResize and CanResizeWithGrip. Unfortunately, the options that enable resizing also enable maximizing the window, and those that don't are useless to me.

Is there an option to disable the maximize button while keeping the resize feature?

I'd prefer solutions that don't involve WinAPI stuff.

  • Why would you want to disable the maximize button, yet allow the window to be resized? – Dai Sep 9 '13 at 22:18
  • 1
    Because windows that have a MaxWidth set usually look like shit when maximized. Try maximizing the command prompt and you'll see. – Peter W. Sep 9 '13 at 22:22
  • @Dai, WPF dialogs are good examples. Take a look at VS2013's Options window - it is resizable but there are no minimize or maximize buttons – MickyD Nov 3 '14 at 5:50
  • @Dai A user will seldom intentionally resize a window to cover overthinking else, or minimise it and 'lose' it, resulting in confusion. With the buttons there, this happens very easily. – ProfK Nov 19 '16 at 15:25
29

WPF does not have the native capability to disable the Maximize button alone, as you can do with WinForms. You will need to resort to a WinAPI call. It's not scary:

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern int GetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex);
[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern int SetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex, int dwNewLong);

private const int GWL_STYLE = -16;
private const int WS_MAXIMIZEBOX = 0x10000;

private void Window_SourceInitialized(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var hwnd = new WindowInteropHelper((Window)sender).Handle;
    var value = GetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_STYLE);
    SetWindowLong(hwnd, GWL_STYLE, (int)(value & ~WS_MAXIMIZEBOX));
}
  • Will that disable any other ways to maximize the window as well? I really don't want the user to try to maximize it through the task manager or whatever. – Peter W. Sep 9 '13 at 22:25
  • @Peter The maximize system control menu item is grayed out and the Win7/Win8 Aero 'drag to top to maximize' gesture and keyboard shortcuts won't work. The Task Manager will still allow you to maximize the window and other programs which use the WinAPI directly can still do it. Don't worry too much about it. If someone REALLY wants to maximize the window, you can't stop them. – Scott Sep 9 '13 at 22:31
  • 3
    Actually, I was wrong. Sorry, should have tested more thoroughly. This code will hide the maximize button, per your question. If you set a MaxWidth/MaxHeight then maximizing the window will just move it to the top-left. The contents would not exceed the maximum size you set. – Scott Sep 9 '13 at 22:55
  • Alright, I guess I'll go with this. Much obliged. – Peter W. Sep 10 '13 at 21:29
64

Disabled only Maximize:

ResizeMode="CanMinimize"
  • 14
    This also disables resizing the window – RobSiklos Aug 7 '15 at 15:41
  • 2
    @RobSiklos thanks, I was trying to do both haha, was about to look into how to do the disable of resize and saw your comment. – hellyale Nov 9 '15 at 19:26
26

If you set

WindowStyle="ToolWindow"

In your window's properties, it will give you a resizable window with no minimize or maximize buttons at the top. It'll be square looking and the close button is also square, but at least minimize and maximize aren't there!

9

P/Invoke Method

The easiest way to call unmanaged code (C++ in this case) from managed (.NET) code is to use the Platform Invocation Services, often also referred to as P/Invoke. You simply provide the compiler with a declaration of the unmanaged function and call it like you would call any other managed method. There is an unmanaged SetWindowLong method that can be used to change an attribute of a specified window. To be able to call this method from your WPF window class using P/Invoke, you simply add the following declaration to the window class:

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
private static extern int SetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex, int dwNewLong);

The DllImport attribute specifies the name of the DLL that contains the method and the extern keyword tells the C# compiler that the method is implemented externally and that it won’t find any implementation or method body for it when compiling the application. The first argument to be passed to the SetWindowLong method is a handle for the window for which you want to disable any of the mentioned buttons. You can get handle for a WPF window by creating an instance of the managed WindowInteropHelper class and access its Handle property in an event handler for the window’s SourceInitialized event. This event is raised when the handle has been completely created. The second argument of the SetWindowLong method specifies the attribute or value of the window to be set, expressed as a constant integer value. When you want to change the window style, you should pass the GWL_STYLE (= -16) constant as the second argument to the method.

private const int GWL_STYLE = -16;

Finally the third argument specifies the the replacement value. There are a set of constants that you could use here:

private const int WS_MAXIMIZEBOX = 0x10000; //maximize button
private const int WS_MINIMIZEBOX = 0x20000; //minimize button

Note however that since you are supposed to pass in a DWORD that specifies the complete value for the “property” specified by the second argument, i.e. the window style in this case, you cannot simply pass any of these constants by themselves as the third argument to the method. There is another GetWindowLong method that retrieves the current value of a specific property – again the GWL_STYLE in this case – and you can then use bitwise operators to get the correct value of the third parameter to pass to the SetWindowLong method. Below is a complete code sample of how you for example could disable the minimize button for a window in WPF:

public partial class MainWindow : Window
{
 [DllImport("user32.dll")]
 private static extern int GetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex);
 [DllImport("user32.dll")]
 private static extern int SetWindowLong(IntPtr hWnd, int nIndex, int  dwNewLong);

 private const int GWL_STYLE = -16;

 private const int WS_MAXIMIZEBOX = 0x10000; //maximize button
 private const int WS_MINIMIZEBOX = 0x20000; //minimize button

 public MainWindow() {
  InitializeComponent();
  this.SourceInitialized += MainWindow_SourceInitialized;
}

private IntPtr _windowHandle;
private void MainWindow_SourceInitialized(object sender, EventArgs e) {
_windowHandle = new WindowInteropHelper(this).Handle;

 //disable minimize button
 DisableMinimizeButton();
}

protected void DisableMinimizeButton() {
  if (_windowHandle == IntPtr.Zero)
    throw new InvalidOperationException("The window has not yet been completely initialized");

   SetWindowLong(_windowHandle, GWL_STYLE, GetWindowLong(_windowHandle,  GWL_STYLE) & ~WS_MAXIMIZEBOX);
 }
}

Disabling the minimize button is then simply a matter of replacing the WS_MAXIMIZEBOX constant with the WS_MINIMIZEBOX

4

Another option is catching the StateChanged event which is raised when the window is maximized. Then simply set the WindowState to "Normal".

This however does not hide the maximize box!

private void Window_StateChanged(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    if (WindowState == WindowState.Maximized)
    {
        WindowState = WindowState.Normal;
    }
}
  • 1
    The main problem with this solution is that you will see visual feedback of the window getting maximized and then moved back to the normal state. – Vinicius de Melo Rocha Feb 12 at 15:39
1

You can create a custom window by setting WindowStyle to None, which removes the Minimize, Maximize and Close buttons, and create yourself the buttons you need. That's a great example for this:

http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/131515/WPF-Custom-Chrome-Library

It gives you some extra work, but if you realy don't want to use WinAPI, that's an option.

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