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C++98 has front_inserter, back_inserter, and inserter, but there don't seem to be any emplacement versions of these in C++11 or draft C++14. Is there any technical reason we couldn't have front_emplacer, back_emplacer, and emplacer?

8
  • 6
    What are you going to assign into them? Tuples of arguments? Sep 10, 2013 at 17:13
  • 1
    @MooingDuck: that already works with inserters Sep 10, 2013 at 17:21
  • 3
    @PavelAnossov: But because the inserters insist on inserting an object of the type held by the container, you pay a penalty (typically a move) for inserting a different type. Emplacement would avoid that penalty. Sep 10, 2013 at 17:22
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    @Walter: Use Case 1: I have a container of ints and a container of objects, where each object can be initialized with an int. I want to append to the container of objects a sequence of new objects initialized with the ints, and I want to do it maximally efficiently. Use case 2: I have a library of algorithms in the STL style, but they operate on multiple input sequences at once (like the two-sequence version of std::transform). I want to add new objects to the front of a sequence, where the new objects' n constructor arguments are taken from the n input sequences I'm processing. Sep 10, 2013 at 17:39
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    @Walter: inserting into an array of objects where the objects are large and/or legacy types that are copiable but not movable . It's not exactly a stretch. Sep 10, 2013 at 17:48

2 Answers 2

35

Is there any technical reason we couldn't have front_emplacer, back_emplacer, and emplacer?

No, there is no technical reason. As proof, here is a complete implementation of back_emplacer with a demo of your Use Case 1...

#include <iterator>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

template<class Container>
class back_emplace_iterator : public std::iterator< std::output_iterator_tag,
                                                   void, void, void, void >
{
protected:
    Container* container;
public:
    typedef Container container_type;

    explicit back_emplace_iterator(Container& x) : container(&x) {}

    template<class T>
    back_emplace_iterator<Container>&
    operator=(T&& t)
    {
        container->emplace_back(std::forward<T>(t));
        return *this;
    }

    back_emplace_iterator& operator*() { return *this; }
    back_emplace_iterator& operator++() { return *this; }
    back_emplace_iterator& operator++(int) { return *this; }
};

template< class Container >
inline back_emplace_iterator<Container>
back_emplacer( Container& c )
{
    return back_emplace_iterator<Container>(c);
}

struct Demo
{
    int i;
    Demo(int i) : i(i) {}
};

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> x = {1,2,3,4,5};

    std::vector<Demo> y;

    std::copy(x.begin(), x.end(), back_emplacer(y));

    for (auto d : y)
        std::cout << d.i << std::endl;
}

Possible Known Issue: Does the universal reference of operator= hide an implicitly generated copy/move operator=? If so these need to be explicitly defined in a way that beats the universal reference in overload resolution.

7
  • I have asked another question regarding the known issue. Sep 10, 2013 at 20:33
  • @MooingDuck: Proxy class for what? Go have a look at the libstdc++ implementation of back_inserter. It is in bits/stl_iterator.h. Sep 10, 2013 at 20:50
  • @MooingDuck: So it is required by the C++ standard to not use a proxy class, but to implement it the way shown. See N3485 24.5.2.2.3. Sep 10, 2013 at 21:25
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    Is the advantage of this over plain back_inserter_iterator? stackoverflow.com/questions/54303852/…
    – alfC
    Jan 22, 2019 at 8:46
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    @alfC: Yeah I now think the notion of back_emplace_iterator is conceptually flawed. "emplace"-style operations take a pack of arguments and then forward them to the constructor. See for example std::vector::emplace_back. Such an operation does not fit into the iterator paradigm, because the underlying iterator abstraction does not support it. Jul 13, 2021 at 22:04
8

Your main use case is already covered by inserter, back_inserter and front_inserter. There is already a value_type && overload of operator= that will move into the container. The only thing emplacer could do over inserter is call explicit constructors.

Compare the common overloads of container::insert, container::push_back and container::push_front to container::emplace, container::emplace_back and container::emplace_front

iterator insert( const_iterator pos, const value_type & value );
iterator insert( const_iterator pos, value_type && value );

template< class... Args > 
iterator emplace( const_iterator pos, Args&&... args );

void push_back( const value_type & value );
void push_back( value_type && value );

template< class... Args >
void emplace_back( Args&&... args );

void push_front( const value_type & value );
void push_front( value_type && value );

template< class... Args >
void emplace_front( Args&&... args );

Each of the emplace variants takes a pack of arguments with which to construct the value. operator = takes exactly one argument. You could write an emplacer that took a tuple of arguments.

template<class Container>
class back_emplace_iterator : public std::iterator< std::output_iterator_tag,
                                                   void, void, void, void >
{
protected:
    Container* container;
public:
    typedef Container container_type;

    explicit back_emplace_iterator(Container& x) : container(&x) {}

    template<typename ... Args>
    back_emplace_iterator<Container>&
    operator=(std::tuple<Args&&...> args)
    {
        std::apply(Container::emplace_back, std::tuple_cat(std::tie(*container), std::forward<std::tuple<Args&&...>>(args)));
        return *this;
    }

    back_emplace_iterator& operator*() { return *this; }
    back_emplace_iterator& operator++() { return *this; }
    back_emplace_iterator& operator++(int) { return *this; }
};

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