35

I am using pip 1.4.1, attempting to install a package from a local path, for example:

pip install /path/to/my/local/package

This does what I want, which is more or less the equivalent of running python /path/to/my/local/package/setup.py install, but I would like to pass some additional options/arguments to my package's setup.py install.

I understand from the pip documentation that this is possible with the --install-option option, for example:

pip install --install-option="--some-option" /path/to/my/local/package

This post from the python-virtualenv Google Group suggests this is possible.

What I do not understand is how to obtain the passed-in "--some-option" from within setup.py. I tried looking at sys.argv, but no matter what I put for "--install-option=", sys.argv is always this:

['-c', 'egg_info', '--egg-base', 'pip-egg-info']

How can I get the values of things passed in as "--install-option" from pip install?

1

5 Answers 5

25

You need to extend the install command with a custom command of your own. In the run method you can expose the value of the option to setup.py (in my example I use a global variable).

from setuptools.command.install import install


class InstallCommand(install):
    user_options = install.user_options + [
        ('someopt', None, None), # a 'flag' option
        #('someval=', None, None) # an option that takes a value
    ]

    def initialize_options(self):
        install.initialize_options(self)
        self.someopt = None
        #self.someval = None

    def finalize_options(self):
        #print("value of someopt is", self.someopt)
        install.finalize_options(self)

    def run(self):
        global someopt
        someopt = self.someopt # will be 1 or None
        install.run(self)

Register the custom install command with the setup function.

setup(
    cmdclass={
        'install': InstallCommand,
    },
    :

It seems that the order of your arguments is off

pip install /path/to/my/local/package --install-option="--someopt"

8
  • By the way, once you subclass the install command you should be able to see those on sys.argv. Commented Oct 18, 2015 at 16:53
  • Just to clarify, within setup(...) how you would access the variable you've passed in using the cmdclass technique?
    – Mani
    Commented Jan 28, 2016 at 15:56
  • The cmdclass sets up having an option (at all). Without it pip will complain and not execute the action. It will pass it along to setup.py, and in there you can inspect your sys.argv for the value of the option. Commented Jan 28, 2016 at 17:02
  • By the way, using underscores in the user_options seems forbidden: distutils.errors.DistutilsGetoptError: invalid long option name 'some_option' (must be letters, numbers, hyphens only Right, I'm trying to use the commented out 'some_val' version of this code and end up with error: option --someval not recognised. This is despite the fact that python setup.py install -h shows that the new flag being recognised.
    – Mani
    Commented Jan 29, 2016 at 8:43
  • 1
    this simply does not work, pip ingests the options and sends them to /dev/null :( Commented Apr 7, 2016 at 14:26
11

For consistency, you can add an option to both setup.py install and setup.py develop (aka pip install -e): (building off Ronen Botzer's answer)

from setuptools import setup
from setuptools.command.install import install
from setuptools.command.develop import develop


class CommandMixin(object):
    user_options = [
        ('someopt', None, 'a flag option'),
        ('someval=', None, 'an option that takes a value')
    ]

    def initialize_options(self):
        super().initialize_options()
        # Initialize options
        self.someopt = None
        self.someval = 0

    def finalize_options(self):
        # Validate options
        if self.someval < 0:
            raise ValueError("Illegal someval!")
        super().finalize_options()

    def run(self):
        # Use options
        global someopt
        someopt = self.someopt # will be 1 or None

        super().run()

class InstallCommand(CommandMixin, install):
    user_options = getattr(install, 'user_options', []) + CommandMixin.user_options

class DevelopCommand(CommandMixin, develop):
    user_options = getattr(develop, 'user_options', []) + CommandMixin.user_options

setup(
    ...,
    cmdclass={
        'install': InstallCommand,
        'develop': DevelopCommand,
    }

Then you can pass options to pip like:

pip install --install-option="--someval=1" --install-option="--someopt" .

Or in develop mode:

pip install -e --install-option="--someval=1" .
2
  • I want to send include_dirs and library_dirs to build my module, previously I'd populate the include_dirs and library_dirs in setup(), how should I be going about this now?
    – Hossein
    Commented Sep 28, 2020 at 10:34
  • 1
    @Rika Don't do this via the install command. Instead look at stackoverflow.com/q/51522248/81658
    – Quantum7
    Commented Nov 11, 2020 at 10:16
7

It works well and also documented.

from setuptools.command.install import install

class InstallCommand(install):             
    user_options = install.user_options + [
        ('engine=', None, '<description for this custom option>'),
    ]                                      

    def initialize_options(self):          
        install.initialize_options(self)   
        self.engine = None  

    def finalize_options(self):                   
        print("value of engine is", self.engine)
        install.finalize_options(self)            

    def run(self):                                
        print(self.engine)                       
        install.run(self)                         

setup(
...
cmdclass={'install': InstallCommand}
...
)

One of common mistakes is to pass setup options to pip like you pass it to setup directly. Use options from pip like that:

pip install . --install-option="--engine=rabbitmq"

But this way is a wrong way:

pip install . --install-option="--engine rabbitmq"

Absence of equal sign causes well known error:

error: option --engines rabbitmq not recognized

2
  • 1
    The link was removed
    – Harmen
    Commented Nov 14, 2022 at 12:02
  • --install-option is now deprecated
    – Rilwan
    Commented Mar 5 at 15:38
1

I was having this problem installing pyside.

I needed to specify the --qmake option.

This is the form you need:

pip install --install-option="--qmake=/usr/lib64/qt4/bin/qmake" PySide
2
  • Thanks for answering. I had set this aside as I found other ways around the problem a while ago, but I will give that a try and see. As I recall, I don't think it worked; there is some difference between installing a local package versus one from PyPI but I may be mistaken.
    – djangodude
    Commented Nov 3, 2014 at 19:29
  • This option --qmake is related to project PySide. To add a custom option you need to register derived class of setuptools.command.install (and/or .develop) to manage it (as written in the answers above).
    – Pascal H.
    Commented Aug 20, 2020 at 16:26
-1

On top of this great anwser. One more thing to notice is that --install-options doesn't work with wheel

Since version 7.0 pip supports controlling the command line options given to setup.py via requirements files. This disables the use of wheels (cached or otherwise) for that package, as setup.py does not exist for wheels.

However, when you build the wheel with setup.py, you can use

python setup.py bdist_wheel install -your-options

To customize the install phase and this will affect the .dist-info of the wheel package.

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