478

I have a simple flex-box layout with a container like:

.grid {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  justify-content: space-between;
}

Now I want the items in the last row to be aligned with the other. justify-content: space-between; should be used because the width and height of the grid can be adjusted.

Currently it looks like

The item in the bottom right should be in the middle

Here, I want the item in the bottom right to be in the "middle column". What is the simplest way to accomplish that? Here is a small jsfiddle that shows this behaviour.

.exposegrid {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  justify-content: space-between;
}

.exposetab {
  width: 100px;
  height: 66px;
  background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.2);
  border: 1px solid rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
  border-radius: 5px;
  box-shadow: 1px 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2);
  margin-bottom: 10px;
}
<div class="exposegrid">
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
  <div class="exposetab"></div>
</div>

7

33 Answers 33

539

Add a ::after which autofills the space. No need to pollute your HTML. Here is a codepen showing it: http://codepen.io/DanAndreasson/pen/ZQXLXj

.grid {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  justify-content: space-between;
}

.grid::after {
  content: "";
  flex: auto;
}
29
  • 24
    Would it be possible to make it work with space-around somehow?
    – Tom
    Jan 19 '16 at 20:56
  • 73
    @DanAndreasson There are two issues, it does not start from the left (like space-between), and also the space between the items of the last row is different than in previous row (simulating some fixed width items in "any-size" grid - relates to both)... codepen.io/anon/pen/gPoYZE What I wanted is to maintain the "strategy" (space-around or space-between) but start from the left like on previous lines... I wanted to know, if it is possible to generalize your amazing solution.
    – Tom
    Jan 20 '16 at 10:33
  • 51
    This only works because the items have padding to space them and the combined percentage widths equal 100% for each set of 4. In this codepen I removed justify-content: space-between; from .grid and removed .grid:after and it works the same. Now if you tried something like this it totally breaks. Notice the widths for each set of 4 dont add up to 100%. In the OP's fiddle the widths are set in px so your solution doesn't work this situation.
    – Jacob
    Jan 26 '16 at 15:01
  • 26
    Trying this solution, initially, the items it was short on the last row weren't spread properly with space-between. However, when I set the flex-basis of .grid:after to the same sizing as the other items in the grid (per-breakpoint, overriding the above default/base module code), the last row spread out correctly. Seems to work on Safari, iOS, Firefox, Chrome (need to test IE) and my largest row size is 3 on my initial implementation.
    – webbower
    Jul 13 '16 at 1:12
  • 12
    For my needs this worked with the following modification: { content: "";flex: 0 0 32%;max-width: 480px;} and I changed the max-width with with media query changes so the grid was perfect at all widths. Nov 17 '18 at 15:31
175

One technique would be inserting a number of extra elements (as many as the max number of elements you ever expect to have in a row) that are given zero height. Space is still divided, but superfluous rows collapse to nothing:

http://codepen.io/dalgard/pen/Dbnus

body {
  padding: 5%;
}

div {
  overflow: hidden;
  background-color: yellow;
}

ul {
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  margin: 0 -4px -4px 0;
  list-style: none;
  padding: 0;
}

li {
  flex: 1 0 200px;
  height: 200px;
  border-right: 4px solid black;
  border-bottom: 4px solid black;
  background-color: deeppink;
}
li:empty {
  height: 0;
  border: none;
}

*,
:before,
:after {
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
<div>
  <ul>
    <li>a</li>
    <li>b</li>
    <li>c</li>
    <li>d</li>
    <li>e</li>
    <li>f</li>
    <li>g</li>
    <li>h</li>
    <li>i</li>
    <li>j</li>
    <li>k</li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
  </ul>
</div>

In the future, this may become achievable through using multiple ::after(n).

16
  • 11
    Unfortunately this contaminates the markup in a non-semantic way, but it totally works. :S I wish I knew of any other way to replicate this behavior, flexbox or otherwise, that didn't require the non-semantic elements. May 21 '14 at 18:03
  • 38
    Agreed, it's dirty, but it works, and is less hacky than a lot of hacks. Feck it, I'm using it, until ::after(12) gains support, or they add some additional justify options. It's a real shame as the way flexbox justify works at the moment is just plain wrong! If you were justifying a paragraph of text you'd never try to justify the last line. Should definitely have been an option, I can't believe they missed this.
    – Codemonkey
    Nov 10 '14 at 13:44
  • 4
    I came up with a CSS only solution.. the caveat being it can only ever account for two missing items, so will only work safely in a flex grid with a maximum of three items per wrapping row. Demo: codepen.io/lukejacksonn/pen/dozqVq The principle here is to use pseudo elements as the extra children and give them the same flex property as the items in the container. Jun 18 '15 at 19:51
  • 10
    @Codemonkey Jesus. I have only started using flexbox thinking how I will get rid of all these hacks intended to align those inline-blocks inside a grid, and now it turns out that it is simply not possible! I have hit that block right away, reaching the limits which I thought I would hardly ever reach happily solving all these old unsolvable CSS problems. Not so fast, I guess. It only took 20 years to get proper vertical centering - we certainly can wait. Jesus, it seems so simple task...
    – Andrey
    Nov 27 '15 at 0:06
  • 3
    @dalgard I don't think so. See my comment.
    – Jacob
    Jan 26 '16 at 15:02
155

As other posters have mentioned - there's no clean way to left-align the last row with flexbox (at least as per the current spec)

However, for what it's worth: With the CSS Grid Layout Module this is surprisingly easy to produce:

Basically the relevant code boils down to this:

ul {
  display: grid; /* 1 */
  grid-template-columns: repeat(auto-fill, 100px); /* 2 */
  grid-gap: 1rem; /* 3 */
  justify-content: space-between; /* 4 */
}

1) Make the container element a grid container

2) Set the grid with auto columns of width 100px. (Note the use of auto-fill (as apposed to auto-fit - which (for a 1-row layout) collapses empty tracks to 0 - causing the items to expand to take up the remaining space. This would result in a justified 'space-between' layout when grid has only one row which in our case is not what we want. (check out this demo to see the difference between them)).

3) Set gaps/gutters for the grid rows and columns - here, since want a 'space-between' layout - the gap will actually be a minimum gap because it will grow as necessary.

4) Similar to flexbox.

ul {
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: repeat(auto-fill, 100px);
  grid-gap: 1rem;
  justify-content: space-between;
  
  /* boring properties */
  list-style: none;
  background: wheat;
  padding: 2rem;
  width: 80vw;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

li {
  height: 50px;
  border: 1px solid green;
}
<ul>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
</ul>

Codepen Demo (Resize to see the effect)

7
  • 4
    Nice solution. Only problem is that it does not work with IE10/11.
    – zendu
    Oct 28 '17 at 0:41
  • 5
    In the light of current possibilities, this should now be the accepted answer. Using :after pseudo-element may lead to unwanted results in edge cases.
    – Paul
    Jan 22 '18 at 10:32
  • 2
    @ Danield this suggestion helped me out a lot, thank you!
    – Krys
    May 3 '18 at 13:31
  • 5
    This should be the accepted answer. I would combine it with flexbox as a fallback, in the spirit of progressive enhancement: browsers that don't support the grid would display the flexbox version, which is close sufficiently enough for me.
    – Palantir
    Jul 27 '18 at 7:38
  • 1
    Thanks alot , you saved my day I have been searching this for week May 3 at 20:22
35

Without any extra markup, just adding ::after worked for me specifying the width of the column.

.grid {
  display:flex;
  justify-content:space-between;
  flex-wrap:wrap;
}
.grid::after{
  content: '';
  width: 10em // Same width of .grid__element
}
.grid__element{
  width:10em;
}

With the HTML like this:

<div class=grid">
   <div class="grid__element"></div>
   <div class="grid__element"></div>
   <div class="grid__element"></div>
</div>
2
  • 9
    this is interesting, but not quite correct. the problem comes when you're dealing with more than two elements in the bottom row - the spacing that emerges between elements on above rows never emerges on the last; the items are hard-packed together, negating the original utility of space-between. Dec 16 '16 at 18:44
  • 1
    even better if you use flex-basis: 10em instead of width. Oct 22 '19 at 8:00
26

I know there are many answers here but.. The simplest way to do this is with a grid instead of flex and grid template columns with repeat and auto fills, where you have to set the number of pixels that you have given to each element, 100px from your snippet code.

.exposegrid {
     display: grid;
     grid-template-columns: repeat(auto-fill, 100px);
     justify-content: space-between;
}
 .exposetab {
     width: 100px;
     height: 66px;
     background-color: rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.2);
     border: 1px solid rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.4);
     border-radius: 5px;
     box-shadow: 1px 1px 2px rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.2);
     margin-bottom: 10px;
}
<div class="exposegrid">
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
   <div class="exposetab"></div>
</div>

2
  • 2
    This is the proper solution to get last row items left aligned.
    – a.barbieri
    Dec 3 '19 at 14:08
  • I agree, proper way is to use grid. It can be achieved with flexbox but much cleaner to use grid.
    – nbarth
    Dec 17 '19 at 0:51
15

You can't. Flexbox is not a grid system. It does not have the language constructs to do what you're asking for, at least not if you're using justify-content: space-between. The closest you can get with Flexbox is to use the column orientation, which requires setting an explicit height:

http://cssdeck.com/labs/pvsn6t4z (note: prefixes not included)

ul {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: column wrap;
  align-content: space-between;
  height: 4em;
}

However, it would be simpler to just use columns, which has better support and doesn't require setting a specific height:

http://cssdeck.com/labs/dwq3x6vr (note: prefixes not included)

ul {
  columns: 15em;
}
7
  • 2
    There is a way; see my answer.
    – dalgard
    Feb 27 '14 at 7:57
  • @dalgard, your answer is a workaround, not a true solution. cimmanon's answer is correct.
    – Jonah
    Apr 29 '16 at 6:18
  • 1
    @Jonah I think "technique" is a fair description of my answer. It has certainly worked as a solution for a lot of people, including the asker.
    – dalgard
    Apr 30 '16 at 10:36
  • 2
    @dalgard It doesn't change the fact that Flexbox does not provide the language constructs to do what's being asked. Furthermore, I would argue that adding fake elements is an extremely dirty practice, right up there with using tables for layout.
    – cimmanon
    Apr 30 '16 at 10:52
  • 4
    It's not pretty, but front end development is the art of the possible; pragmatism is a basic premise. I think the word extremely is misplaced, since extra elements are being used for styling on 99.9 % of real-world web sites (cf. Bootstrap container elements).
    – dalgard
    May 1 '16 at 19:07
12

A possible solution is to use justify-content: flex-start; on the .grid container, size restrictions on its children, and margins on the appropriate child elements -- depending on the desired number of columns.

For a 3-column grid, the basic CSS would look like this:

.grid {
    display: flex;
    flex-flow: row wrap;
    justify-content: flex-start;
}

.grid > * {
    flex: 0 0 32%;
    margin: 1% 0;
}

.grid > :nth-child(3n-1) {
    margin-left: 2%;
    margin-right: 2%;
}

It's another imperfect solution, but it works.

http://codepen.io/tuxsudo/pen/VYERQJ

0
8

If you want a grid with some space between the items and the items starting without any initial space then this simple solution works:

.grid {
    display: flex;
    flex-flow: row wrap;
    margin: 0 -5px; // remove the inital 5px space
    width: auto;
}
.grid__item {
    width: 25%;
    padding: 0 5px; // should be same as the negative margin above.
}

If you want the initial 5px space then just remove the negative margin :) Simple.

https://jsfiddle.net/b97ewrno/2/

The accepted answer, whilst good, it causes there to be no space between the elements on the second row..

7
  • 1
    Surprised this doesn't have any more up votes. This is a beautiful approach that belongs in the Flex museum. Dec 12 '18 at 15:33
  • 1
    @EduardoLaHozMiranda thanks! But why "museum"? IE11 doesn't support css grid and most sites still need to support that. + Some big timers in frontend development still claims there are different use cases for grid v.s. flexbox. But perhaps you just meant that this should be a important part of web history :D
    – OZZIE
    Jan 15 '19 at 14:13
  • 1
    Lol, yeah. I was excited at the time. Just meant it was a great and minimal take on this problem. Jan 16 '19 at 16:29
  • @dencey you don’t need to know that for this solution, it 25% so max 4 per row, but you can use whatever percent you want
    – OZZIE
    Jul 31 '19 at 11:26
  • 1
    @OZZIE fixed item width, not percentage, referring to style in the question, desired effect is items align to the container edge on both side, and have equal space between items on each row. jsfiddle.net/n6k831Ld
    – dencey
    Aug 20 '19 at 8:16
7

Yes.! We can but with some media queries & Maximum no of columns are predefined.

Here am using 4 columns. Check my code:

.container {
  display: flex;
  display: -webkit-flex;
  display: -moz-flex;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  -webkit-flex-flow: row wrap;
  -moz-flex-flow: row wrap;
}

.container .item {
  display: flex;
  display: -webkit-flex;
  display: -moz-flex;
  justify-content: center;
  -webkit-justify-content: center;
  -moz-justify-content: center;
  flex-basis: 25%; //max no of columns in %, 25% = 4 Columns
}

.container .item .item-child {
  width: 130px;
  height: 180px;
  background: red;
  margin: 10px;
}

@media (max-width: 360px) {
  .container .item {
    flex-basis: 100%;
  }
}

@media (min-width:360px) and (max-width: 520px) {
  .container .item {
    flex-basis: 50%;
  }
}

@media (min-width:520px) and (max-width: 680px) {
  .container .item {
    flex-basis: 33.33%;
  }
}
<div class="container">

  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child">1</div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>
  <div class="item">
    <div class="item-child"></div>
  </div>

</div>

NOTE
1) No need to create child div. It may be any other tag like 'img' r whatever you want..
2) If you want more columns adjust the media queries and maximum no.of columns.

1
  • This creates only 3 in latest IE
    – Akxe
    Apr 23 '19 at 9:50
7

This problem was solved for me using CSS grid,

This solution is applicable only if you're having fix number of columns i.e. no. of elements to display in a single row

-> using grid but not specifying number of rows, as number of elements increase it wraps into columns and add rows dynamically, I have specified three columns in this example

-> you don't have to give any position to your child/cells, as it will make it fix, which we don't want.

.grid-class{
  display: grid;
  grid-template-columns: repeat(3, 1fr);
  column-gap: 80px;
}

1
  • This was the best solution for me!
    – ProGrammar
    May 13 at 0:47
5

If you want to align the last item to the grid use the following code:

Grid container

.card-grid {
  box-sizing: border-box;
  max-height: 100%;
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: row;
  -webkit-box-orient: horizontal;
  -webkit-box-direction: normal;
  justify-content: space-between;
  align-items: stretch;
  align-content: stretch;
  -webkit-box-align: stretch;
  -webkit-box-orient: horizontal;
  -webkit-box-direction: normal;
  -ms-flex-flow: row wrap;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
}

.card-grid:after {
  content: "";
  flex: 1 1 100%;
  max-width: 32%;
}

Item in the grid

.card {
  flex: 1 1 100%;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  -webkit-box-flex: 1;
  max-width: 32%;
  display: block;
  position: relative;

}

The trick is to set the max-width of the item equal to the max-width of the .card-grid:after.

Live demo on Codepen

2
  • cthulu blesses you and your computer Mar 30 '17 at 14:19
  • 3
    This approach does not work when size of card is fixed and number of cards in each row are unknown. codepen.io/zendu/pen/WXNGvo
    – zendu
    Oct 28 '17 at 0:51
3

It is possible to use "flex-start" and to add the margins manually. It requires some math-hacking but is definitely easy to do and make it easy to use with a CSS preprocessor like LESS.

See for example this LESS mixin:

.flexboxGridMixin(@columnNumber,@spacingPercent) {
  @contentPercent: 100% - @spacingPercent;
  @sideMargin: @spacingPercent/(@columnNumber*2);
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: row;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  justify-content: flex-start;
  > * {
    box-sizing: border-box;
    width: @contentPercent/@columnNumber;
    margin-left: @sideMargin;
    margin-right: @sideMargin;
  }
}

And then it can easily be used to display a responsive grid layout:

ul {
  list-style: none;
  padding: 0;
  @spacing: 10%;
  @media only screen and (max-width: 499px) { .flexboxGridMixin(1,@spacing); }
  @media only screen and (min-width: 500px) { .flexboxGridMixin(2,@spacing); }
  @media only screen and (min-width: 700px) { .flexboxGridMixin(3,@spacing); }
  @media only screen and (min-width: 900px) { .flexboxGridMixin(4,@spacing); }
  @media only screen and (min-width: 1100px) { .flexboxGridMixin(5,@spacing); }
}

li {
  background: pink;
  height: 100px;
  margin-top: 20px;
}

Here is an example of

http://codepen.io/anon/pen/YyLqVB?editors=110

3
  • You never use @contentPercent. Did you intend to?
    – neverfox
    Jan 31 '16 at 22:28
  • width: @contentPercent/@columnNumber;
    – realtebo
    Jul 3 '17 at 9:26
  • WOW ! I'm really impressed by this solution. I'll try to adapt to my situation
    – realtebo
    Jul 3 '17 at 9:28
3

Also you can do this:

.exposegrid:last-child {
  margin-right: auto;
}
2

This is a combination of a lot of the answers but it does exactly what I was needing -- which is, aligning the last child in a flex container to the left while maintaining the space-between behavior (in this case it's a three-column layout).

Here's the markup:

.flex-container {
  display: flex;
  justify-content: space-between;
  flex-direction: row;
}

.flex-container:after {
  content: "";
  flex-basis: 30%;
}
2
  • 1
    To be more generic: flex-basis size must be equal to the size of the childs. Jun 2 '17 at 11:01
  • 1
    I've found flex-grow: 0.9 instead of flex-basis works for any number of columns. Tested in a bunch of modern browsers - it works in them all but the padding is broken in IE (but working in Edge0 Aug 18 '17 at 19:13
1

This version is best way for blocks with fixed width:

http://codepen.io/7iomka/pen/oxxeNE

In other cases - version of dalgard

http://codepen.io/dalgard/pen/Dbnus

body {
  padding: 5%;
}

div {
  overflow: hidden;
  background-color: yellow;
}

ul {
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
justify-content:center;
  margin: 0 -4px -4px 0;
  list-style: none;
  padding: 0;
}

li {
  flex: 1 0 200px;
  height: 200px;
  max-width:200px;
  min-width:200px;
  border-right: 4px solid black;
  border-bottom: 4px solid black;
  background-color: deeppink;
}
li:empty {
  height: 0;
  border: none;
}

*,
:before,
:after {
  box-sizing: border-box;
}
<div>
  <ul>
    <li>a</li>
    <li>b</li>
    <li>c</li>
    <li>d</li>
    <li>e</li>
    <li>f</li>
    <li>g</li>
    <li>h</li>
    <li>i</li>
    <li>j</li>
    <li>k</li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
    <li></li>
  </ul>
</div>

1

Just add few fake items with same properties except for height set to 0px to the end.

3
  • Adding fake items is bad practice in every single way. You're not supposed to fill the DOM with stuff just to hack around css unless its mandatory. For many reasons, from accessibility, to flooding the codebase with weird stuff, to making the logic more complex to understand and list goes on. Don't recommend hacks unless you explicitely say it might be a bad solution or there's a special case for that.
    – Eksapsy
    Mar 9 '20 at 0:55
  • @Eksapsy Well, i cant find any solution working in 100% cases and without using javascript. Using javascript makes it more complicated. Grid + column-template ? Maybe it has to work in IE11 too so no. nth-child, last-child, 'after' specifier... none of these are working in specific scenarios. Sometimes there is no other way than use ugly code or lower design requirements.
    – Erik Parso
    Aug 20 '20 at 17:49
  • Funny, this is actually the only solution that works in practice (besides JS-hacking), and it has 0 votes. Well... not anymore! Anyway, the number of empty divs you need to add is N - 1, where N is the max number of items in a row. Note that this solutions permits the container to use space-around, space-between and space-evenly for its justify-content property. Also best to to set the empty divs to flex: 0 0 nn where nn is the same flex-basis as the real elements have. Oct 5 '20 at 18:08
1

Even though gap is coming to Flexbox I will add a solution that works.

It uses the sibling combinator to check 2 conditions.

The first condition it checks is if an element is the second to last div:nth-last-child(2)

For 4 column layouts we need to check for postions 2 & 3 Check if it is in the second row of 4 div:nth-of-type(4n+2) or third in a row div:nth-of-type(4n+3)

For 3 column layouts we only need to check position 2

div:nth-of-type(3n+2)

We can then combine like below for 4 column layouts

div:nth-last-child(2) + div:nth-of-type(4n+2)

div:nth-last-child(2) + div:nth-of-type(4n+3)

We also need to take care of one edge case, Any number that is 3n+2 & multiple of 4 will get the 35% margin-right div:nth-last-child(2) + div:nth-of-type(4n+4)

3 column layouts will be

div:nth-last-child(2) + div:nth-of-type(3n+2)

Then we need to add a margin to the above selectors. The margin-right will need to be calculated and will depend on the flex-basis.

I have added a sample with 3 and 4 columns and a media query. I have also added a small JavaScript button that adds a new div so you can check it works.

It is a little bit of CSS but it works. I also wrote about this on my site if you want a little more explanation. https://designkojo.com/css-programming-using-css-pseudo-classes-and-combinators

var number = 11;

$("#add").on("click", function() {
    number = number + 1;
    $("#main").append("<div>" + number + "</div>");
});
body {
  margin: 0;
}
main{
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  align-items: flex-start;
  align-content: flex-start; /* vertical */
  justify-content: space-between;
  min-width: 300px;
  max-width: 1200px;
  margin: 20px auto;
  background-color: lightgrey;
  height: 100vh;
}
div {
  flex-basis: 30%;
  background-color: #5F3BB3;
  min-height: 20px;
  height: 50px;
  margin-bottom: 20px;
  display: flex;
  justify-content: center;
  align-items: center;
  color: #9af3ff;
  font-size: 3em;
}


div:nth-last-child(2) + div:nth-of-type(3n+2) {
  background-color: #f1b73e;
  margin-right: 35%;
}

@media screen and (min-width: 720px) {

  div {
    flex-basis: 22%;
  }

  div:nth-last-child(2) {
    background-color: greenyellow;
  }

  div:nth-of-type(4n+2) {
    background-color: deeppink;
  }

  /* Using Plus combinator is for direct sibling */
  div:nth-last-child(2) + div:nth-of-type(4n+2) {
    background-color: #f1b73e;
    margin-right: 52%;
  }

  div:nth-last-child(2) + div:nth-of-type(4n+3) {
    background-color: #f1b73e;
    margin-right: 26%;
  }

  /* Also need to set the last to 0% to override when it become (3n+2)
   * Any number that is 3n+2 & multiple of 4 will get the 35% margin-right
   * div:nth-last-child(2) + div:nth-of-type(3n+2)
   */

  div:nth-last-child(2) + div:nth-of-type(4n+4) {
    background-color: #f1b73e;
    margin-right: 0;
  }

}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">

<head>
  <meta charset="UTF-8">
  <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0">
  <link rel="stylesheet" href="style.css">
  <title>My New Project</title>
</head>

<body>

<header>


</header>

<button id="add">Add</button>
<main id="main">

  <div>1</div>
  <div>2</div>
  <div>3</div>
  <div>4</div>
  <div>5</div>
  <div>6</div>
  <div>7</div>
  <div>8</div>
  <div>9</div>
  <div>10</div>
  <div>11</div>


</main>
<script src="https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.3/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script src="action.js"></script>
</body>
</html>

1
  • 1
    U R A bloody Genuis sir! thx alot Apr 27 at 17:21
0

There is a way without flexbox, although you'd need to meet the following conditions. 1) The container has padding. 2) Items are the same size and you know exactly how many you want per line.

ul {
  padding: 0 3% 0 5%;
}
li {
  display: inline-block; 
  padding: 0 2% 2% 0;
  width: 28.66%;
}

The smaller padding on the right side of the container allows for the extra padding to the right of each list item. Assuming other items in the same parent as the list object are padded with 0 5%, it will be flush with them. You can also adjust the percentages to however much margin you'd like or use calculate px values.

Of course, you can do the same without the padding on the container by using nth-child (IE 9+) to remove margin on every third box.

0

Using flexbox and a few media queries, I made this little work-around: http://codepen.io/una/pen/yNEGjv (its a bit hacky but works):

.container {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  justify-content: flex-start;
  max-width: 1200px;
  margin: 0 auto;
}

.item {
  background-color: gray;
  height: 300px;
  flex: 0 30%;
  margin: 10px;

  @media (max-width: 700px) {
     flex: 0 45%;
  }

  @media (max-width: 420px) {
    flex: 0 100%;
  }

  &:nth-child(3n-1) {
    margin-left: 10px;
    margin-right: 10px;
  }
}
0

I made a SCSS mixin for it.

@mixin last-row-flexbox($num-columns, $width-items){

  $filled-space: $width-items * $num-columns;
  $margin: calc((100% - #{$filled-space}) / (#{$num-columns} - 1));

  $num-cols-1 : $num-columns - 1;

  &:nth-child(#{$num-columns}n+1):nth-last-child(-n+#{$num-cols-1}) ~ & {
    margin-left: $margin;
  }
  @for $i from 1 through $num-columns - 2 { 
    $index: $num-columns - $i;
    &:nth-child(#{$num-columns}n+#{$index}):last-child{
      margin-right: auto;
    }
  }
}

This is the codepen link: http://codepen.io/diana_aceves/pen/KVGNZg

You just have to set the items width in percentage and number of columns.

I hope this can help you.

0

Here's another couple of scss mixins.

These mixins assume that you are not going to use js plugins like Isotope (they don't respect html markup order, thus messing up with css nth rules).

Also, you will be able to take full advantage of them especially if you're writing your responsive breakpoints in a mobile first manner. You ideally will use flexbox_grid() on the smaller breakpoint and flexbox_cell() on the following breakpoints. flexbox_cell() will take care of resetting previously setted margins no longer used on larger breakpoints.

And by the way, as long as you correctly setup your container's flex properties, you can also use only flexbox_cell() on the items, if you need to.

Here's the code:

// apply to the container (for ex. <UL> element)
@mixin flexbox_grid($columns, $gutter_width){

  display: flex;
  flex-direction:row;
  flex-wrap:wrap;
  justify-content: flex-start;

  > *{
    @include flexbox_cell($columns, $gutter_width);
  }
}

// apply to the cell (for ex. a <LI> element)
@mixin flexbox_cell($columns, $gutter_width){
  $base_width: 100 / $columns;
  $gutters: $columns - 1;
  $gutter_offset: $gutter_width * $gutters / $columns;

  flex-grow: 0;
  flex-shrink: 1;
  flex-basis: auto; // IE10 doesn't support calc() here

  box-sizing:border-box; // so you can freely apply borders/paddings to items
  width: calc( #{$base_width}% - #{$gutter_offset} );

  // remove useless margins (for cascading breakponts)
  &:nth-child(#{$columns}n){
    margin-right: 0;
  }

  // apply margin
  @for $i from 0 through ($gutters){
    @if($i != 0){
      &:nth-child(#{$columns}n+#{$i}){
        margin-right: $gutter_width;
      }
    }
  }
}

Usage:

ul{
   // just this:
   @include flexbox_grid(3,20px);
}

// and maybe in following breakpoints, 
// where the container is already setted up, 
// just change only the cells:

li{
   @include flexbox_cell(4,40px);
}

Obviously, it's up to you to eventually set container's padding/margin/width and cell's bottom margins and the like.

Hope it helps!

0

This is pretty hacky, but it works for me. I was trying to achieve consistent spacing/margins.

.grid {
  width: 1024px;
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  padding: 32px;
  background-color: #ddd;  

  &:after {
    content: "";
    flex: auto;
    margin-left:-1%;
  }

  .item {
    flex: 1 0 24.25%;
    max-width: 24.25%;
    margin-bottom: 10px;
    text-align: center;
    background-color: #bbb;

    &:nth-child(4n+2),
    &:nth-child(4n+3),
    &:nth-child(4n+4) {
      margin-left: 1%;
    }

    &:nth-child(4n+1):nth-last-child(-n+4),
      &:nth-child(4n+1):nth-last-child(-n+4) ~ .item {
        margin-bottom: 0;
    }    

  }
}

http://codepen.io/rustydev/pen/f7c8920e0beb0ba9a904da7ebd9970ae/

0
0

Seems like no one proposed the flex-grow solution on last item. The idea is to have your last flex item to take all the place it can using flex-grow: 1.

.grid {
  display: flex;
  flex-flow: row wrap;
  justify-content: space-between;
}

.grid > *:last-child {
  flex-grow: 1;
}

Note: This solution is not perfect, especially if you have centered elements inside your flex items as it will center on the possibly huge last flex item.

0

Oh boy, I think I found a good solution with minimal CSS and no JS. Check it out:

img {width:100%;}
li {
  display: inline-block;
  width:8em;
  list-style:none;
}
ul {text-align: justify;}
<ul>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li>
    <img src="http://www.planwallpaper.com/static/images/kitty-cat.jpg" />
  </li>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
  <li></li>
</ul>

The key here is to remember that what we are trying to achieve is exactly what text-align: justify does!

The empty elements in the HTML are there to make the last row display perfectly without changing the appearance, but might not be needed given what you are trying to achieve. For perfect balance in every situation, you need at least x-4 empty elements, x being the number of elements to display, or n-2, n being the number of column you want to display.

0

Assuming:

  • You want 4 column grid layout with wrapping
  • The number of items is not necessarily a multiple of 4

Set a left margin on every item except 1st, 5th and 9th item and so on. If the left margin is 10px then each row will have 30px margin distributed among 4 items. The percentage width for item is calculated as follows:

100% / 4 - horizontal-border - horizontal-padding - left-margin * (4 - 1) / 4

This is a decent workaround for issues involving last row of flexbox.

.flex {
  display: flex;
  flex-direction: row;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  margin: 1em 0 3em;
  background-color: peachpuff;
}

.item {
  margin-left: 10px;
  border: 1px solid;
  padding: 10px;
  width: calc(100% / 4 - 2px - 20px - 10px * (4 - 1) / 4);
  background-color: papayawhip;
}

.item:nth-child(4n + 1) {
  margin-left: 0;
}

.item:nth-child(n + 5) {
  margin-top: 10px;
}
<div class="flex">
  <div class="item">1</div>
  <div class="item">2</div>
  <div class="item">3</div>
  <div class="item">4</div>
</div>
<div class="flex">
  <div class="item">1</div>
  <div class="item">2</div>
  <div class="item">3</div>
  <div class="item">4</div>
  <div class="item">5</div>
  <div class="item">6</div>
</div>
<div class="flex">
  <div class="item">1</div>
  <div class="item">2</div>
  <div class="item">3</div>
  <div class="item">4</div>
  <div class="item">5</div>
  <div class="item">6</div>
  <div class="item">7</div>
  <div class="item">8</div>
  <div class="item">9</div>
</div>

0

If you know the width of spaces between elements in the row and the amount of elements in a row, this would work:

Example: 3 elements in a row, 10px gap between elements

div:last-child:nth-child(3n+2) {
  flex-grow: 1
  margin-left: 10px
}
0

I modified the example presented by Dan Andreasson by using a right border on elements to create a faux gutter. You can then use nth-child to remove the border on the last-child of the column grid count you need. here is a demo https://codepen.io/JacobLett/pen/mdVoroM

/* demo only */
body {
margin:0;
padding:0;
max-width:1024px;
margin:0 auto;
}
.block-list {
background: #ccc;
  border:1px solid #ccc;
}

.block-list .block-list__item {
background: #eee;
}
/* demo only */




.block-list .block-list__item {
   min-height: 100px;
   margin-bottom: 1rem;
}

@media only screen and (min-width: 900px) {
   .block-list {
      display: -webkit-box;
      display: flex;
      flex-wrap: wrap;
      -webkit-box-pack: justify;
      justify-content: space-between;
      background-color: #ffffff;
      margin: 1em auto;
   }

   .block-list:after {
      content: "";
      -webkit-box-flex: 1;
      flex: auto;
   }

   .block-list__item {
      height: 10em;
      width: 25%;
      box-sizing: border-box;
      border-right: 10px solid white;
   }

   .block-list-2 .block-list__item {
      width: 50%;
   }

   .block-list-2 .block-list__item:nth-child(2n) {
      border: none;
   }

   .block-list-3 .block-list__item {
      width: 33.3%;
   }

   .block-list-3 .block-list__item:nth-child(3n) {
      border: none;
   }

   .block-list-4 .block-list__item {
      width: 25%;
   }

   .block-list-4 .block-list__item:nth-child(4n) {
      border: none;
   }
   
   .block-list-5 .block-list__item {
      width: 20%;
   }

   .block-list-5 .block-list__item:nth-child(5n) {
      border: none;
   }
   
   .block-list-6 .block-list__item {
      width: 16.66%;
   }

   .block-list-6 .block-list__item:nth-child(6n) {
      border: none;
   }
}
<h2>2 column</h2>
<div class="block-list block-list-2">
   <div class="block-list__item">1
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">2
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">3
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">4
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">5
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">6
   </div>
</div>
<h2>3 column</h2>
<div class="block-list block-list-3">
   <div class="block-list__item">1
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">2
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">3
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">4
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">5
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">6
   </div>
</div>

<h2>4 column</h2>
<div class="block-list block-list-4">
   <div class="block-list__item">1
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">2
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">3
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">4
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">5
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">6
   </div>
</div>
<h2>5 column</h2>
<div class="block-list block-list-5">
   <div class="block-list__item">1
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">2
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">3
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">4
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">5
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">6
   </div>
</div>
<h2>6 column</h2>
<div class="block-list block-list-6">
   <div class="block-list__item">1
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">2
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">3
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">4
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">5
   </div>
   <div class="block-list__item">6
   </div>
</div>

0

If the individual child items have an explicit width (eg. 32%), you can solve this by adding an :after element to the parent and giving this the same explicit width.

0

There are solutions here where people suggest writing exact layout css-classes, faking the last item with pseudo-element, using non-flexbox approaches etc.

One big problem is the gaps between neighbors (case - aligned buttons wrapping to multiple lines). In such a case, you don't want the items to touch each other, there is a need for gaps. I just want to add an adoptive solution that respects gaps and works with any number of items. It is based on the idea of fake last element too though, but is more universal. See snippet comments for details.

html {
  font-size: 1px;
}

.container {
  font-size: 16rem;
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  justify-content: space-between;
}

.item {
  background-color: orange;
  border-radius: 10rem;
  box-sizing: border-box;
  color: white;
  margin-bottom: 10rem;
  padding: 15rem 10rem;
  text-align: center;
}
<!--
Our setup from design (example) used later in calculations:

container-width: 100%; (can be any)
max-per-row = 4;
total = 6;
desired-hor-gap = 10rem; (equal to vert. gap)

If you go dynamic (drawing html according to the coming data either in a backend template or in a frontend template), you have to calculate and then set exact properties inline.

<i> (or any real html element) is needed to set inline styles to arrange the last row properly.

"2" in <i> calc function - is 6 % 4 since calc doesn't allow for "%" operator. But in real life you will calculate these numbers in JS or some backend template anyway.

   Formulas written in elements' calc functions. Seem to be self-descriptive, but the idea is to set for the last fake item the remainder width + hypothetical gaps.
-->

<div class="container">

<div style="flex: 0 1 calc((100% - (4 - 1) * 10rem) / 4);" class="item">do stuff</div>
<div style="flex: 0 1 calc((100% - (4 - 1) * 10rem) / 4);" class="item">do stuff</div>
<div style="flex: 0 1 calc((100% - (4 - 1) * 10rem) / 4);" class="item">do stuff</div>
<div style="flex: 0 1 calc((100% - (4 - 1) * 10rem) / 4);" class="item">do stuff</div>
<div style="flex: 0 1 calc((100% - (4 - 1) * 10rem) / 4);" class="item">do stuff</div>
<div style="flex: 0 1 calc((100% - (4 - 1) * 10rem) / 4);" class="item">do stuff</div>

<i style="flex: 0 1 calc((100% - (4 - 1) * 10rem) / 4 * (4 - 2) + ( 4 - 2 - 1) * 10rem);"></i>
</div>

0

I found an efficient solution that the justify-content can be also center / space-evenly / etc... (if you know the number of items in a single row):

HTML:

<section class="container">
    <div class="flex-item"></div>
    <div class="flex-item"></div>
    <div class="flex-item"></div>
    <div class="flex-item"></div>
    <div class="flex-item"></div>

    <p aria-hidden="true"></p>
    <p aria-hidden="true"></p>
    <p aria-hidden="true"></p>
  </section>

The number of <p> tags (it can be any other tag) is the number of items in each row minus 1. With different screen sizes you can manipulate it with media queries.

CSS:

.container {
  display: flex;
  flex-wrap: wrap;
  justify-content: center;
  gap: 20px;
}

.flex-item {
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
  background: #21BA45;
}

.container > p {
  width: 300px;
  height: 300px;
}

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