150

As PEP8 suggests keeping below the 80 column rule for your python program, how can I abide to that with long strings, i.e.

s = "this is my really, really, really, really, really, really, really long string that I'd like to shorten."

How would I go about expanding this to the following line, i.e.

s = "this is my really, really, really, really, really, really" + 
    "really long string that I'd like to shorten."
  • 24
    +1 for the bold move to risk it all ;) – thethinman Dec 11 '09 at 17:58
87

Implicit concatenation might be the cleanest solution:

s = "this is my really, really, really, really, really, really," \
    " really long string that I'd like to shorten."

Edit On reflection I agree that Todd's suggestion to use brackets rather than line continuation is better for all the reasons he gives. The only hesitation I have is that it's relatively easy to confuse bracketed strings with tuples.

  • 4
    This is why I felt like an idiot posting the question. Cheers. – Federer Dec 9 '09 at 15:33
  • 6
    This is line continuation by escaping the endline, not merely implicit concatenation, and until very recently explicitly forbidden in PEP8, although now there is an allowance, but NOT for long strings. Todd's answer below is correct. – Aaron Hall Dec 12 '13 at 22:16
  • 3
    I like PEP8, but this is part of PEP8 that I don't like. I feel like the implicit continuation is clearer, because of the possibility for confusion with tuples – monknomo Sep 20 '16 at 18:31
226

Also, because neighboring string constants are automatically concatenated, you can code it like this too:

s = ("this is my really, really, really, really, really, really, "  
     "really long string that I'd like to shorten.")

Note no plus sign, and I added the extra comma and space that follows the formatting of your example.

Personally I don't like the backslashes, and I recall reading somewhere that its use is actually deprecated in favor of this form which is more explicit. Remember "Explicit is better than implicit."

I consider the backslash to be less clear and less useful because this is actually escaping the newline character. It's not possible to put a line end comment after it if one should be necessary. It is possible to do this with concatenated string constants:

s = ("this is my really, really, really, really, really, really, " # comments ok
     "really long string that I'd like to shorten.")

I used a Google search of "python line length" which returns the PEP8 link as the first result, but also links to another good StackOverflow post on this topic: "Why should Python PEP-8 specify a maximum line length of 79 characters?"

Another good search phrase would be "python line continuation".

  • +1 agree with everything – u0b34a0f6ae Dec 9 '09 at 15:48
  • 2
    +1: "Personally I don't like the backslashes, and I recall reading somewhere that its use is actually deprecated in favor of this form which is more explicit. Remember "Explicit is better than implicit."" – Alberto Megía Sep 19 '13 at 8:16
  • 9
    For everyone who gets a tuple and wonders why. Do not add commas to the end of the lines here, that will result in a tuple, not a string. ;) – bugmenot123 Sep 18 '15 at 13:00
  • 5
    Isn't adding the + character more explicit than the given example? I'd still consider this implicit. i.e. "str1" + "str2" rather than "str1" "str2" – user1318135 Oct 3 '17 at 20:50
  • 2
    I actually agree that the plus sign is more explicit, but it does a different thing. It turns the string into an expression to be evaluated, rather than specifying a single string constant in a number of pieces. I'm not certain but I think this is done during parsing whereas the expression needs to be executed later. The speed difference is probably negligible unless there are a huge number of them. But also aesthetically I prefer the automatic concatenation since it is one less cluttery character per line. – Todd Dec 12 '17 at 4:30
13

You lost a space, and you probably need a line continuation character, ie. a \.

s = "this is my really, really, really, really, really, really" +  \
    " really long string that I'd like to shorten."

or even:

s = "this is my really, really, really, really, really, really"  \
    " really long string that I'd like to shorten."

Parens would also work instead of the line continuation, but you risk someone thinking you intended to have a tuple and had just forgotten a comma. Take for instance:

s = ("this is my really, really, really, really, really, really"
    " really long string that I'd like to shorten.")

versus:

s = ("this is my really, really, really, really, really, really",
    " really long string that I'd like to shorten.")

With Python's dynamic typing, the code may run either way, but produce incorrect results with the one you didn't intend.

12

I think the most important word in your question was "suggests".

Coding standards are funny things. Often the guidance they provide has a really good basis when it was written (e.g. most terminals being unable to show > 80 characters on a line), but over time they become functionally obsolete, but still rigidly adhered to. I guess what you need to do here is weigh up the relative merits of "breaking" that particular suggestion against the readability and mainatinability of your code.

Sorry this doesn't directly answer your question.

  • I totally agree. There is a similar Java style rule that has become obsolete too (IMHO). – Iker Jimenez Dec 9 '09 at 15:26
  • Yes I agree, however It's been racking my head how I would abide to it in this particular example. I always try to keep classes, methods to < 80 characters, however I'd say a string like this has no effect other than perhaps a negative one. – Federer Dec 9 '09 at 15:30
  • +1 for valid argument :) – Federer Dec 9 '09 at 15:30
  • You also need to weigh your personal preference against the community-wide coding standard. You want new people to be able to come in and be comfortable with the code formatting from day one. – retracile Dec 9 '09 at 15:34
  • 1
    I know for my own self, I tend to stick to the 80 character limit just because I still do most of my coding in IDLE and I don't like the way it handles horizontal scrolling. (No scroll bar) – Tofystedeth Dec 9 '09 at 16:04
4

Backslash:

s = "this is my really, really, really, really, really, really" +  \
    "really long string that I'd like to shorten."

or wrap in parens:

s = ("this is my really, really, really, really, really, really" + 
    "really long string that I'd like to shorten.")
  • 2
    Note that the plus is necessary. Python concatenates string literals that follow each other. – bukzor Sep 23 '11 at 18:21
1

With a \ you can expand statements to multiple lines:

s = "this is my really, really, really, really, really, really" + \
"really long string that I'd like to shorten."

should work.

0

I tend to use a couple of methods not mentioned here for specifying large strings, but these are for very specific scenarios. YMMV...

  • Multi-line blobs of text, often with formatted tokens (not quite what you were asking, but still useful):

    error_message = '''
    I generally like to see how my helpful, sometimes multi-line error
    messages will look against the left border.
    '''.strip()
    
  • Grow the variable piece-by-piece through whatever string interpolation method you prefer:

    var = 'This is the start of a very,'
    var = f'{var} very long string which could'
    var = f'{var} contain a ridiculous number'
    var = f'{var} of words.'
    
  • Read it from a file. PEP-8 doesn't limit the length of strings in a file; just the lines of your code. :)

  • Use brute-force or your editor to split the string into managaeble lines using newlines, and then remove all newlines. (Similar to the first technique I listed):

    foo = '''
    agreatbigstringthatyoudonotwanttohaveanyne
    wlinesinbutforsomereasonyouneedtospecifyit
    verbatimintheactualcodejustlikethis
    '''.replace('\n', '')
    
0

I've used textwrap.dedent in the past. It's a little cumbersome so I prefer line continuations now but if you really want the block indent, I think this is great.

Example Code (where the trim is to get rid of the first '\n' with a slice):

import textwrap as tw
x = """
       This is a yet another test.
       This is only a test"""
print(tw.dedent(x[1:]))

Explanation:

From what I can tell, dedent calculates the indentation based on the white space in the first line of text before a new line. So I added a newline to make it easy to line up the code. To avoid the newline, you'd have to add to the first line of text extra white space so that subsequent lines would have their indentation reduced as you desire. If you wanted to tweak it, you could easily reimplement it using the re module.

This method has limitations in that very long lines way still be longer than you want in which case other methods that concatenate strings is more suitable.

  • 1
    Rather than trimming with x[1:] you can put a backslash after x = """ to avoid the first newline. – Michael Dunn Sep 13 '18 at 8:36

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