1
$stmt = $mysqli->prepare("SELECT id, expire, status, username FROM username WHERE username= ?");
$stmt->bind_param('s', $username);
$stmt->execute();
// Store the result (so you can get the properties, like num_rows)
$stmt->store_result();
// Get the number of rows
$amountOfRows = $stmt->num_rows;

// Bind the result to variables
$stmt->bind_result($id, $expire, $status, $db_username);
// Process the variables
while($stmt->fetch()) {
    printf("%d %s %s %s\n", $id, $expire, $status, $db_username);
}

Do I need to add

$stmt->free_result();

What about

$stmt->close();

and

$mysqli->close();

QUESTION 1: I am guessing the answer is yes, but I want to know what each of these three do, so I can have a better understanding of how to use them.

I couldn't find much documentation that described what they do and why they are important.

QUESTION 2: My code run perfectly fine at face value, so what are the benefits to using these? Data Management, performance, security, SQL Injection... ?

  • 1
  • @KaiQing Yea, I've read those... that documentation doesn't really go into detail on why it is important to use those statements. Just gives a very brief description of what it does. – Arian Faurtosh Sep 11 '13 at 17:05
  • 1
    Free result, for example, notes that you must clear before executing another stored procedure and that it releases the referenced object from memory. So then you may infer the importance of this should you be developing something where every bit of memory matters. In many cases it just won't make much of a difference since php will auto clean. – Kai Qing Sep 11 '13 at 17:10
  • Why are you trying to avoid calling them? What benefit do you see in not calling them? – Andy Lester Sep 11 '13 at 17:12
  • @AndyLester mostly simplicity.. if php will auto clean, what is the point? – Arian Faurtosh Sep 11 '13 at 17:13
1

Short answer: not vital.

Long answer: I thought the following commands free up memory:

$stmt->free_result();
$stmt->close();
$mysqli->close();

I wasn't sure, so I tested it.

echo(memory_get_usage());  // returns 226472

$mysqli = new mysqli(/* credentials */);
$stmt = $mysqli->prepare("SELECT id, username FROM members");
$stmt->execute();
$stmt->store_result();
$amountOfRows = $stmt->num_rows;
$stmt->bind_result($id, $username);

while($stmt->fetch()) {
    printf("%d %s\n", $id, $username);
}

echo(memory_get_usage());  // now returns 230176 (gained 3704)

$stmt->free_result();
echo(memory_get_usage());  // returns 230176 (lost 0)

$stmt->close();
echo(memory_get_usage());  // returns 229816 (lost 360)

$mysqli->close();
echo(memory_get_usage());  // returns 229720 (lost 96)

$stmt->close() and $mysqli->close() actually free up memory, but it is a tiny bit.

Your system won't be any more vulnerable because you choose not to write these two/three lines. They only free up (little) memory. It is arguably better style to include at least $mysqli->close() in your code, but it's up to you.

Verdict: not vital.

| improve this answer | |
  • it's a great answer, but do the figures depend on the number of records you retrieve? – Dima Dz Aug 16 '16 at 17:35
  • not vital, but you dont wanna leek memory and you gain some speed by freeing resources directly. – Grumpy Jul 1 '17 at 13:35

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