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I have lots of values in properties files, which are read in my app to setup values (DB connections, email servers, etc.).

db.properties:

db.user=admin
db.pwd=secret1234

Now in my DatabaseService class, I have something like this:

private static final String DB_USER = "db.user";
private static final String DB_PWD = "db.pwd";
private Properties dbProps = new Properties();
// read db.properties values into dbProps
String user = dbProps.getProperty(DB_USER);

Then in my DatabaseServiceTest class, I have repeated code:

private static final String DB_USER = "db.user";
private static final String DB_PWD = "db.pwd";
private Properties dbProps = new Properties();
// read db.properties values into dbProps
String user = dbProps.getProperty(DB_USER);

So I have repeated code. So instead I have put the static String values into a StaticVars class that hosts all of the Strings so the DatabaseService and DatabaseServiceTest now look like this (I could also put the Properties in the utility class, but there are scores of this example, so I haven't so far):

private Properties dbProps = new Properties();
// read db.properties values into dbProps
String user = dbProps.getProperty(StaticVars.DB_USER);

Is there a better way to share the static Strings across multiple class files? My current StaticVars class has about 150 static String values, and growing. It seems like I am going down the wrong path.

Thanks, Sean

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  • I dont see how you are repeating String because you have them defined only 1 place namely StaticVars class
    – smk
    Sep 11 '13 at 18:46
  • Correct, I can see where my verbiage is confusing. By using the StaticVars class, I only have the code in one location. However, I want to know if that is an acceptable standard, or if I should rethink the design altogether. Sep 11 '13 at 20:34
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I think your general approach - using public static final String members of a public class - is a fine way to share strings across an application.

However don't underestimate the importance of naming. When you come back to this code in 6 months will you remember that the names of your properties are stored in a class called StaticVars? If you are truly only storing property names, then perhaps the class should be called PropertyNames. Now you have bounded the scope of the class and will be less likely mix in strings for error messages or regular expressions or whatever. (Those should go into different classes with meaningful names to help you remember what kind of values they store.)

Taking this a step further, since these are property names, they are likely to be used in getProperty calls. So why not rename the class PropertyUtils or ConfigUtils, and have matching static methods which use the property names. Then you can add default property values if certain properties are optional.

   public static final String DB_HOST = "db.host";
   public static final String DB_USER = "db.user";
   public static final String DB_PWD = "db.pwd";

   public static String getDbHost(Properties props)
   {
      return props.getProperty(DB_HOST, "localhost");
   }
   public static String getDbUser(Properties props)
   {
      return props.getProperty(DB_USER, "admin");
   }
   public static String getDbPwd(Properties props)
   {
      return props.getProperty(DB_PWD);
   }
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  • Well, at least one other person on Earth agrees with me, so that's good enough for now. I'll continue to use this approach. Thanks for the time and thought. Sep 11 '13 at 20:36

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