7

I'm a beginner and currently reading inheritance and polymorphism. I'm having some confusion in terms of the keyword "extend" and how constructors are called. Here's the code:

public class Test {
  public static void main(String[] args) {
    new B();
  }
}

class A {
  int i = 7;

  public A() {
    System.out.println("i from A is " + i);
  }

  public void setI(int i) {
    this.i = 2 * i;
  }
}

class B extends A {
  public B() {
    setI(20);
    System.out.println("i from B is " + i);
  }

  public void setI(int i) {
    this.i = 3 * i;
  }
}

I know that by calling B() in line 3, class A's constructor is invoked, and then B's is invoked (is that right?) and thus it displays "i from A is 7" and then "i from B is 60". But can someone explain the importance of this? Why is int i in B completely different from in i in A? Again, I'm having trouble following the "path" of the code after the line new B(). If someone could explain each step after B() is invoked, that would be much appreciated.

  • 1
    Google Java Constructor Chaining – PM 77-1 Sep 11 '13 at 21:59
10

I'm having trouble following the "path" of the code after the line new B(). If someone could explain each step after B() is invoked, that would be much appreciated.

When calling new B(), the flow technically enters the constructor B() first. Constructors in Java always need to (eventually) chain to a higher constructor (recursively until the highest class, Object, is reached). Chaining is denoted by a super(...) or this(...) statement as the first statement of the constructor. If none is explicitly written, the parameterless super() is assumed. So, B() actually compiles as if it were written like this:

  public B() {
    super();
    setI(20);
    System.out.println("i from B is " + i);
  }

Now you can clearly see that new B() calls B() which calls A() (which calls println and exits), then setI and finally println.

Why is int i in B completely different from in i in A?

The i is exactly the same field. The difference comes from the fact that you've invoked setI(20) between the two printouts, thus changing the value of i. If you remove the call to setI, you'll see that the value remains 7.

  • Great answer! +1 for both the question and the answer! – VictorCreator Sep 11 '13 at 22:06
  • I see I see. So when classes are chained together through inheritance and when a constructor is invoked, the highest level constructor is invoked first? Say if you have C extends B, B extends A, and C() is called, then A's constructor, followed by B's, then A's is invoked? – xheyhenry Sep 11 '13 at 22:20
  • @xheyhenry Let's say that C extends B and B extends A. In that case, a new C(...) expression calls a constructor of C, but the constructor of C is required by the language to (either implicitly or explicitly) specify a constructor to invoke (chain) before doing anything else. Let's say that this is a constructor of B. Equally, the constructor of B has to invoke another constructor before doing anything else. Again, that could be a constructor of A. – Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Sep 11 '13 at 22:28
  • 1
    @xheyhenry This is boils down to the fact that, excluding the chaining statements, the statements in the constructor of A will be invoked first, then the statements in the constructor of B, then the statements in the constructor of C. However, it's better not to view them as a series but as a nested construct: C calls B which in turn calls A which does its stuff then returns, then B does its stuff then returns, then C does its stuff. – Theodoros Chatzigiannakis Sep 11 '13 at 22:29
1

When you are creating your instance of B and you call the constructor B(), it will first call super(), which in your case will call A().

This prints i from A is 7, because 7 is your default that you are setting i to.

After super is called, it moves on to the next line, which is setI(20). This line sets the i in B to 60 because your setI(int i) method multiplies the parameter (20) by 3, then sets i to that value.

Then, you are printing i from B is 60 because i is now 60.

1

The Java language spec says

If a constructor body does not begin with an explicit constructor invocation and the constructor being declared is not part of the primordial class Object, then the constructor body implicitly begins with a superclass constructor invocation "super();", an invocation of the constructor of its direct superclass that takes no arguments.

This means that when you write new B(), the first thing that the constructor for B does is to call the constructor for A. After the constructor for A has set i to 7, the constructor for B invokes setI(20), which changes the value of i to 60. There's only one i - it's not different in A and in B. It has simply changed value between one println and the next.

0

A subclass must always call the constructor of its superclass via super() or by invoking another constructor using super and the arguments of that constructor.

If you don't add super() explicitly, Java will do it for you behind the scenes.

class B extends A {

}

Is the same as calling:

class B extends A {
    public B() {
        super();
    }
}

Knowing that, it should be apparent that calling new B(); will call the B constructor, which then calls the A constructor before finishing.

0

When you call to new B(), VM calls implicity super(), then a new A() is writing 7, but in your setI you are overwriting the method, it is because you see 60.

Use anotation @Override is allways a good idea.

BR

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