15

I have a lot of if, else if statements and I know there has to be a better way to do this but even after searching stackoverflow I'm unsure of how to do so in my particular case.

I am parsing text files (bills) and assigning the name of the service provider to a variable (txtvar.Provider) based on if certain strings appear on the bill.

This is a small sample of what I'm doing (don't laugh, I know it's messy). All in all, There are approximately 300 if, else if's.

if (txtvar.BillText.IndexOf("SWGAS.COM") > -1)
{
    txtvar.Provider = "Southwest Gas";
}
else if (txtvar.BillText.IndexOf("georgiapower.com") > -1)
{
    txtvar.Provider = "Georgia Power";
}
else if (txtvar.BillText.IndexOf("City of Austin") > -1)
{
    txtvar.Provider = "City of Austin";
}
// And so forth for many different strings

I would like to use something like a switch statement to be more efficient and readable but I'm unsure of how I would compare the BillText. I'm looking for something like this but can't figure out how to make it work.

switch (txtvar.BillText)
{
    case txtvar.BillText.IndexOf("Southwest Gas") > -1:
        txtvar.Provider = "Southwest Gas";
        break;
    case txtvar.BillText.IndexOf("TexasGas.com") > -1:
        txtvar.Provider = "Texas Gas";
        break;
    case txtvar.BillText.IndexOf("Southern") > -1:
        txtvar.Provider = "Southern Power & Gas";
        break;
}

I'm definitely open to ideas.

I would need the ability to determine the order in which the values were evaluated. As you can imagine, when parsing for hundreds of slightly different layouts I occasionally run into the issue of not having a distinctly unique indicator as to what service provider the bill belongs to.

8
  • 2
    A for loop over a list of strings? EDIT: over a list of BillText, Provider tuples.
    – millimoose
    Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:02
  • 2
    switch(true) could work. Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:03
  • 2
    There is no need to use multiple tags (especially non-applicable ones like parsing). Also, it's not necessary to post dozens of lines of redundant code to illustrate the concept. We catch on pretty quickly here. :-)
    – Ken White
    Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:09
  • 4
    You could use txtvar.BillText.Contains("value") for readability
    – Ben
    Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:16
  • 1
    Commenting here as it applies to pretty much all answers. Using a dictionary (=data) instead of if/else (=code) makes it trivial to read the replacements from an external source (like a csv file) that can be extended without the need to recompile your application.
    – linac
    Commented Sep 12, 2013 at 8:25

8 Answers 8

23

Why not use everything C# has to offer? The following use of anonymous types, collection initializers, implicitly typed variables, and lambda-syntax LINQ is compact, intuitive, and maintains your modified requirement that patterns be evaluated in order:

var providerMap = new[] {
    new { Pattern = "SWGAS.COM"       , Name = "Southwest Gas" },
    new { Pattern = "georgiapower.com", Name = "Georgia Power" },
    // More specific first
    new { Pattern = "City of Austin"  , Name = "City of Austin" },   
    // Then more general
    new { Pattern = "Austin"          , Name = "Austin Electric Company" }   
    // And for everything else:
    new { Pattern = String.Empty      , Name = "Unknown" }
};

txtVar.Provider = providerMap.First(p => txtVar.BillText.IndexOf(p.Pattern) > -1).Name; 

More likely, the pairs of patterns would come from a configurable source, such as:

var providerMap =
    System.IO.File.ReadLines(@"C:\some\folder\providers.psv")
    .Select(line => line.Split('|'))
    .Select(parts => new { Pattern = parts[0], Name = parts[1] }).ToList();

Finally, as @millimoose points out, anonymous types are less useful when passed between methods. In that case we can define a trival Provider class and use object initializers for nearly identical syntax:

class Provider { 
    public string Pattern { get; set; } 
    public string Name { get; set; } 
}

var providerMap =
    System.IO.File.ReadLines(@"C:\some\folder\providers.psv")
    .Select(line => line.Split('|'))
    .Select(parts => new Provider() { Pattern = parts[0], Name = parts[1] }).ToList();
10
  • +1 - I like this, although it doesn't account for a no-match scenario (which you could easily do with FirstOrDefault(), and then a null check).
    – Tim M.
    Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:37
  • I don't believe the OP has yet confirmed (or denied) that the order in which patterns should be examined is important.
    – millimoose
    Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:39
  • +1: Another good approach, although initialization is more typing than string[][2]. However, I'll admit that it's a more general solution because it allows the key and value to be different types. Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:41
  • 1
    @TimMedora If the Pattern of the last Provider is the empty string it will guarantee a catch-all match without having to worry about a null result (which would have no Name property) Commented Sep 12, 2013 at 0:08
  • 1
    @millimoose Aah..I see what you're saying (pointing out the difficulty of exposing anonymous types to other methods). In that case a trivial POCO class would suffice as well as the anonymous type used here. I just wanted to present a little "best-of-C#" showcase here for teaching purposes. Commented Sep 12, 2013 at 0:12
15

Since you seem to need to search for the key before returning the value a Dictionary is the right way to go, but you will need to loop over it.

// dictionary to hold mappings
Dictionary<string, string> mapping = new Dictionary<string, string>();
// add your mappings here
// loop over the keys
foreach (KeyValuePair<string, string> item in mapping)
{
    // return value if key found
    if(txtvar.BillText.IndexOf(item.Key) > -1) {
        return item.Value;
    }
}

EDIT: If you wish to have control over the order in which elemnts are evaluated, use an OrderedDictionary and add the elements in the order in which you want them evaluated.

11
  • 4
    The disadvantage of a dictionary is that you don't have any control over the order of the evaluation. You may have a case where "SCE" goes to "Southern California Edison" and "SCEC" goes to "South Carolina Electric Company". You want to look for SCEC before SCE. Better to use a List<Pair> structure instead. You don't need fast lookup that the Dictionary hash provides. Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:14
  • 4
    @MarkLakata OrderedDictionary Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:16
  • There was no indication of such a restriction. But OrderedDictionary came to mind too, it's just less standard and seemingly unnecessary in this context. But good point, I'll add an edit.
    – Serdalis
    Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:18
  • @MarkLakata I strongly strongly doubt the ordering matters in this case.
    – millimoose
    Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:19
  • @MarkLakata I'd also argue in this case it's better to ask the OP for clarification rather than read too much into their choice of control structure (and honestly, 400 lines of else ifs is rarely a deliberate choice) and knock answers on an assumption.
    – millimoose
    Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:30
10

One more using LINQ and Dictionary

var mapping = new Dictionary<string, string>()
                        {
                            { "SWGAS.COM", "Southwest Gas" },
                            { "georgiapower.com", "Georgia Power" }
                            .
                            .
                        };

return mapping.Where(pair => txtvar.BillText.IndexOf(pair.Key) > -1)
              .Select(pair => pair.Value)
              .FirstOrDefault();

If we prefer empty string instead of null when no key matches we can use the ?? operator:

return mapping.Where(pair => txtvar.BillText.IndexOf(pair.Key) > -1)
              .Select(pair => pair.Value)
              .FirstOrDefault() ?? "";

If we should consider the dictionary contains similar strings we add an order by, alphabetically, shortest key will be first, this will pick 'SCE' before 'SCEC'

return mapping.Where(pair => txtvar.BillText.IndexOf(pair.Key) > -1)
              .OrderBy(pair => pair.Key)
              .Select(pair => pair.Value)
              .FirstOrDefault() ?? "";
0
7

To avoid the blatant Schlemiel the Painter's approach that looping over all the keys would involve: let's use regular expressions!

// a dictionary that holds which bill text keyword maps to which provider
static Dictionary<string, string> BillTextToProvider = new Dictionary<string, string> {
    {"SWGAS.COM", "Southwest Gas"},
    {"georgiapower.com", "Georgia Power"}
    // ...
};

// a regex that will match any of the keys of this dictionary
// i.e. any of the bill text keywords
static Regex BillTextRegex = new Regex(
    string.Join("|", // to alternate between the keywords
                from key in BillTextToProvider.Keys // grab the keywords
                select Regex.Escape(key))); // escape any special characters in them

/// If any of the bill text keywords is found, return the corresponding provider.
/// Otherwise, return null.
string GetProvider(string billText) 
{
    var match = BillTextRegex.Match(billText);
    if (match.Success) 
        // the Value of the match will be the found substring
        return BillTextToProvider[match.Value];
    else return null;
}

// Your original code now reduces to:

var provider = GetProvider(txtvar.BillText);
// the if is be unnecessary if txtvar.Provider should be null in case it can't be 
// determined
if (provider != null) 
    txtvar.Provider = provider;

Making this case-insensitive is a trivial exercise for the reader.

All that said, this does not even pretend to impose an order on which keywords to look for first - it will find the match that's located earliest in the string. (And then the one that occurs first in the RE.) You do however mention that you're searching through largeish texts; if .NET's RE implementation is at all good this should perform considerably better than 200 naive string searches. (By only making one pass through the string, and maybe a little by merging common prefixes in the compiled RE.)

If ordering is important to you, you might want to consider looking for an implementation of a better string search algorithm than .NET uses. (Like a variant of Boyer-Moore.)

3
4

What you want is a Dictionary:

Dictionary<string, string> mapping = new Dictionary<string, string>();
mapping["SWGAS.COM"] = "Southwest Gas";
mapping["foo"] = "bar";
... as many as you need, maybe read from a file ...

Then just:

return mapping[inputString];

Done.

2
  • 7
    Right track but not really correct. There is no equivalence between the intputstring and the key. Notice that the OP use IndexOf
    – Steve
    Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:06
  • 2
    You're not addressing how the OP could remove the if else structure from their code. All you've done is made the txtvar.Provider = "CPS Energy"; a bit cleaner, i.e. txtvar.Provider = mapping[searchString]; Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:06
4

One way of doing it (other answers show very valid options):

void Main()
{
    string input = "georgiapower.com";
    string output = null;

    // an array of string arrays...an array of Tuples would also work, 
    // or a List<T> with any two-member type, etc.
    var search = new []{
        new []{ "SWGAS.COM", "Southwest Gas"},
        new []{ "georgiapower.com", "Georgia Power"},
        new []{ "City of Austin", "City of Austin"}
    };

    for( int i = 0; i < search.Length; i++ ){

        // more complex search logic could go here (e.g. a regex)
        if( input.IndexOf( search[i][0] ) > -1 ){
            output = search[i][1];
            break;
        }
    }

    // (optional) check that a valid result was found.
    if( output == null ){
        throw new InvalidOperationException( "A match was not found." );
    }

    // Assign the result, output it, etc.
    Console.WriteLine( output );
}

The main thing to take out of this exercise is that creating a giant switch or if/else structure is not the best way to do it.

5
  • Case insensitive matching can be accomplished with a dictionary. Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:08
  • @Asad - thanks. Never knew that but you are right: stackoverflow.com/questions/6676245/…
    – Tim M.
    Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:10
  • 1
    You could even implement the fuzzy matching in an IEqualityComparer and plug that into the dictionary. Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:11
  • 1
    +1 because this evaluates the same as the original if/else but is easier to read. The dictionary method doesn't do the same thign. Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:16
  • 3
    @MarkLakata Although I agree that the traditional use of a dictionary would be more restrictive than this method, the way I have used it in my answer is identical in function to how Tim has used an array. We are just storing the elements differently. Logically the answers are equivalent.
    – Serdalis
    Commented Sep 11, 2013 at 23:27
1

There are several approaches to do this, but for the reason of simplicity, conditional operator may be a choice:

Func<String, bool> contains=x => {
    return txtvar.BillText.IndexOf(x)>-1;
};

txtvar.Provider=
    contains("SWGAS.COM")?"Southwest Gas":
    contains("georgiapower.com")?"Georgia Power":
    contains("City of Austin")?"City of Austin":
    // more statements go here 
    // if none of these matched, txtvar.Provider is assigned to itself
    txtvar.Provider;

Note the result is according to the more preceded condition which is met, so if txtvar.BillText="City of Austin georgiapower.com"; then the result would be "Georgia Power".

0

you can use dictionary.

Dictionary<string, string> textValue = new Dictionary<string, string>();
foreach (KeyValuePair<string, string> textKey in textValue)
{
  if(txtvar.BillText.IndexOf(textKey.Key) > -1) 
   return textKey.Value;

}

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