0

I have googled skip list and found a book "Ontroduction to Algorithms" http://epaperpress.com/sortsearch/index.html and get the skip list tutorial sample from the following http://epaperpress.com/sortsearch/skl.html

There is a skl.c which is running well , but as I study the code I have found something confused me , showes as the follwoing :

typedef int keyType;            /* type of key */

/* user data stored in tree */
typedef struct {
    int stuff;                  /* optional related data */
} recType;


/* levels range from (0 .. MAXLEVEL) */
#define MAXLEVEL 15

typedef struct nodeTag {
    keyType key;                /* key used for searching */
    recType rec;                /* user data */
    struct nodeTag *forward[1]; /* skip list forward pointer */
} nodeType;

/* implementation independent declarations */
typedef struct {
    nodeType *hdr;              /* list Header */
    int listLevel;              /* current level of list */
} SkipList;

SkipList list;                  /* skip list information */

and the function confused me is the following :

void initList() {
    int i;

   /**************************
    *  initialize skip list  *
    **************************/

    if ((list.hdr = malloc(
        sizeof(nodeType) + MAXLEVEL*sizeof(nodeType *))) == 0) {
        printf ("insufficient memory (initList)\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    for (i = 0; i <= MAXLEVEL; i++)
        list.hdr->forward[i] = NIL;
    list.listLevel = 0;
}

Seems MAXLEVEL = 15 in this test , so in initList() , it would do list.hdr->forward[0] = NIL; to list.hdr->forward[15] = NIL; and look at nodeType structure , it has the forward var struct nodeTag *forward[1]; , not struct nodeTag *forward[MAXLEVEL];

I think the correct structure should be :

typedef struct nodeTag {
    keyType key;                /* key used for searching */
    recType rec;                /* user data */
    struct nodeTag *forward[MAXLEVEL]; /* skip list forward pointer */
} nodeType;

not

typedef struct nodeTag {
    keyType key;                /* key used for searching */
    recType rec;                /* user data */
    struct nodeTag *forward[1]; /* skip list forward pointer */
} nodeType;

Or I missed something ?

1

I think the original is correct.

Look carefully at this malloc:

list.hdr = malloc(sizeof(nodeType) + MAXLEVEL*sizeof(nodeType *)));

Note the MAXLEVEL*sizeof(nodeType *) in the expression. What this is doing is allocating a nodeType AND MAXLEVEL * nodeType* in a single malloc. So it is allocating the node and an array of nodeType*. This works because the array is the last field in the structure. So the node and the array are one contiguous piece of memory.

Argubly more correct would have been the typedef

typedef struct nodeTag {
    keyType key;                /* key used for searching */
    recType rec;                /* user data */
    struct nodeTag *forward[0]; /* skip list forward pointer */
} nodeType;

Note the zero array size.

This is a common C idiom when used with the malloc expression above. It allows you to decide the array size at runtime rather than compile time. But remember that the array must be the last field in struct.

Rici makes two very good points in his comment below.

| improve this answer | |
  • thanks , your comment is really helpful , I got it , forward is a array , filled of pointer , so just malloc enough memory for forward , then use like forward[0] , forward[1],...are all pointers , and I see why it must be the last field , thanks !! – barfatchen Sep 12 '13 at 2:45
  • Glad I could be of help. This idiom is common but the first time I saw it I was confused too. – Charlie Burns Sep 12 '13 at 2:48
  • Yes , I see other source for skip list with ** , this is the first source I study using array of pointers , your explanation really help,thanks !!! – barfatchen Sep 12 '13 at 2:50
  • @CharlieBurns: 0-length arrays are not allowed by standard C (6.7.6.2p1 "If the expression [between brackets] is a constant expression, it shall have a value greater than zero."). gcc and possibly other compilers allow 0-length arrays, but I'm not sure you could call that "more correct". Also notice that the initialization uses for (i=0; i<=MAXLEVEL; ++i) (rather than i<MAXLEVEL) which requires the array to be of size MAXLEVEL+1, which is precisely the size it is malloc'd as. – rici Sep 12 '13 at 6:52
  • @Rici. Thanks. In the wild I see a[0] more than a[1], I was not aware that a[0] was not allowed. It's certainly out there. You are absolutely right about the initialization. – Charlie Burns Sep 12 '13 at 15:04

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.