20

I have several hundred gpg encrypted files in a directory, of the format filename.xyz.gpg where "xyz" is some arbitrary extension. I need to decrypt all of the files to generate filename.xyz decrypted in such a way that I don't have to manually enter the password for each file.

I have tried the following for directory "Testing":

for file in 'ls Testing'; do (echo <password>|gpg --passphrase-fd 0 -d $file 
--output     $file.decrypted);

I just wind up with a command prompt >, and nothing happens.

What is the matter with my syntax? Is there some more efficient way to do this without a bash shell loop?

1
  • Maybe swap echo password with gpg command? Echo'ing password before command is ok?
    – aso
    Sep 12 '13 at 16:14
27

gpg can decrypt multiple files so you shouldn't need to write a loop.

Try the following. You will need to enter your password once.

gpg --passphrase-fd 0 --decrypt-files *.gpg 
4
  • Thanks, that certainly makes it easier. I also found some documentation suggesting the use of --multifile for situations like this, so that the passphrase has to only be entered once. Incidentally, I like your leaf beetle avatar! Sep 12 '13 at 16:32
  • 1
    thanks. It's a dogbane leaf beetle if you're interested!
    – dogbane
    Sep 12 '13 at 16:35
  • --decrypt-files should be the same as --multifile --decrypt anyway.
    – Ben
    Sep 25 '13 at 23:25
  • 3
    With my current version of gpg I just need gpg --decrypt-files *.gpg \o/
    – phunehehe
    Sep 29 '14 at 8:27
16

As it is said in the manual you need to add --batch option:

   --passphrase-fd n
          Read the passphrase from file descriptor n. Only the first line will be read from file descriptor n. If you use 0 for n, the passphrase will be read from
          STDIN. This can only be used if only one passphrase is supplied.  Note that this passphrase is only used if the option --batch has also been given.  This is
          different from gpg.

   --passphrase string
          Use string as the passphrase. This can only be used if only one passphrase is supplied. Obviously, this is of very questionable security on a multi-user sys‐
          tem. Don't use this option if you can avoid it.  Note that this passphrase is only used if the option --batch has also been given.  This is different from
          gpg.

You can have either of these two forms:

echo "passphrase" | gpg --passphrase-fd 0 --batch -d --output "decrypted.file" "file.gpg"

Or simpler:

gpg --passphrase "passphrase" --batch -d --output "decrypted.file" "file.gpg"

You can try a script like this to extract your files:

#!/bin/bash

read -rsp "Enter passphrase: " PASSPHRASE

for FILE in *.*.gpg; do
    echo "Extracting $FILE to ${FILE%.gpg}."
    echo "$PASSPHRASE" | gpg --passphrase-fd 0 --batch -d --output "${FILE%.gpg}" "$FILE"
done
1
  • 3
    Not sure it's great to have the passphrase in the command line like this as then it becomes visible to all users on the system using ps and similar tools
    – BenKennish
    Jun 7 '16 at 10:37
5

I had success with

gpg --decrypt-files *.gpg

cf. https://serverfault.com/a/388068/103585

0

I had success with gpg --decrypt-files * but not *.gpg

0

It worked with below commands for me:

For single file: gpg --decrypt --input C:\PGPFiles\[encryptedfilename.pgp] --passphrase [yourpassphrase]

For multiple files: gpg --decrypt --input C:\PGPFiles\* --passphrase [yourpassphrase]

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