428

I ran into an issue in my Rails 4 app while trying to organize JS files "the rails way". They were previously scattered across different views. I organized them into separate files and compile them with the assets pipeline. However, I just learned that jQuery's "ready" event doesn't fire on subsequent clicks when turbo-linking is turned on. The first time you load a page it works. But when you click a link, anything inside the ready( function($) { won't get executed (because the page doesn't actually load again). Good explanation: here.

So my question is: What is the right way to ensure that jQuery events work properly while turbo-links are on? Do you wrap the scripts in a Rails-specific listener? Or maybe rails has some magic that makes it unnecessary? The docs are a bit vague on how this should work, especially with respect to loading multiple files via the manifest(s) like application.js.

19 Answers 19

561

Here's what I do... CoffeeScript:

ready = ->

  ...your coffeescript goes here...

$(document).ready(ready)
$(document).on('page:load', ready)

last line listens for page load which is what turbo links will trigger.

Edit...adding Javascript version (per request):

var ready;
ready = function() {

  ...your javascript goes here...

};

$(document).ready(ready);
$(document).on('page:load', ready);

Edit 2...For Rails 5 (Turbolinks 5) page:load becomes turbolinks:load and will be even fired on initial load. So we can just do the following:

$(document).on('turbolinks:load', function() {

  ...your javascript goes here...

});
19
  • 3
    Is that coffee script? I haven't learned it yet. Is there a js or jQuery equivalent to your example? Sep 12, 2013 at 17:23
  • 6
    Think I got it: var ready = function() { ... } $(document).ready(ready) $(document).on('page:load', ready) Is there any concern for both .ready and 'page:load' getting triggered? Sep 12, 2013 at 17:38
  • 4
    @Emerson there is a very useful website, with an explicit name: js2coffee.org
    – MrYoshiji
    Sep 12, 2013 at 17:43
  • 16
    I can confirm that the ready function does not get called twice. If it's a hard refresh, only the ready event is fired. If it's a turbolinks load, only the page:load event is fired. It's impossible for both ready and page:load to be fired on the same page.
    – Christian
    Mar 14, 2014 at 6:53
  • 7
    FYI You can also apply this for multiple events page:load and ready by including a space-separated string for the first argumet. $(document).on('page:load ready', ready); The second argument is simply a function, which happens to be named ready, following this answer's example.
    – ahnbizcad
    Aug 18, 2014 at 12:43
236

I just learned of another option for solving this problem. If you load the jquery-turbolinks gem it will bind the Rails Turbolinks events to the document.ready events so you can write your jQuery in the usual way. You just add jquery.turbolinks right after jquery in the js manifest file (by default: application.js).

14
  • 2
    Awesome, thanks! Exactly what I need. The rails way. Convention. Dec 15, 2013 at 3:52
  • 6
    Acording to the documentation, you should add //= require jquery.turbolinks to the manifest (e.g. application.js).
    – kindrobot
    Dec 28, 2013 at 17:31
  • 1
    @wildmonkey the two answers are mutually exclusive. 0.o
    – ahnbizcad
    Aug 18, 2014 at 8:18
  • 1
    You need to restart your rails server when you add this gem Jul 27, 2015 at 17:33
  • 21
    Please note that Rails 4 is now defaulting to Turbolinks 5 which, in turn, is not supported by jquery.turbolinks! See github.com/kossnocorp/jquery.turbolinks/issues/56
    – sebastian
    Jul 5, 2016 at 12:08
201

Recently I found the most clean and easy to understand way of dealing with it:

$(document).on 'ready page:load', ->
  # Actions to do

OR

$(document).on('ready page:load', function () {
  // Actions to do
});

EDIT
If you have delegated events bound to the document, make sure you attach them outside of the ready function, otherwise they will get rebound on every page:load event (causing the same functions to be run multiple times). For example, if you have any calls like this:

$(document).on 'ready page:load', ->
  ...
  $(document).on 'click', '.button', ->
    ...
  ...

Take them out of the ready function, like this:

$(document).on 'ready page:load', ->
  ...
  ...

$(document).on 'click', '.button', ->
  ...

Delegated events bound to the document do not need to be bound on the ready event.

5
  • 9
    This is much simpler than the accepted answer of creating a separate ready() function. Bonus upvotes for the explanation of binding delegated events outside of the ready function.
    – Christian
    Mar 14, 2014 at 6:55
  • 1
    On disadvantage of this method is that $(document).on( "ready", handler ), deprecated as of jQuery 1.8. jquery/ready
    – mfazekas
    Aug 12, 2014 at 1:31
  • @Dezi @mfazekas Would this solution work if you're using earlier versions of jQuery, and WITHOUT the jquery-turbolinks gem? Or is the ready portion made invalid BY using the gem?
    – ahnbizcad
    Aug 18, 2014 at 10:30
  • The simplest and easiest way to do it. It supports js code distributed in multiple files and I don't have to bother in which order they were included. Much cleaner than the variable assignment. Mar 30, 2015 at 10:08
  • 3
    You should probably use "page:change" instead of "page:load", as the former is fired whether the page is loaded from the server or from client-side cache. Apr 28, 2015 at 14:22
91

Found this in the Rails 4 documentation, similar to DemoZluk's solution but slightly shorter:

$(document).on 'page:change', ->
  # Actions to do

OR

$(document).on('page:change', function () {
  // Actions to do
});

If you have external scripts that call $(document).ready() or if you can't be bothered rewriting all your existing JavaScript, then this gem allows you to keep using $(document).ready() with TurboLinks: https://github.com/kossnocorp/jquery.turbolinks

0
81

As per the new rails guides, the correct way is to do the following:

$(document).on('turbolinks:load', function() {
   console.log('(document).turbolinks:load')
});

or, in coffeescript:

$(document).on "turbolinks:load", ->
alert "page has loaded!"

Do not listen to the event $(document).ready and only one event will be fired. No surprises, no need to use the jquery.turbolinks gem.

This works with rails 4.2 and above, not only rails 5.

9
  • nice this worked for me. Tried solution here: stackoverflow.com/questions/17881384/… but did not work for some reason. Now I load on turbolinks:load instead
    – krinker
    Aug 3, 2016 at 16:59
  • 1
    Can anyone confirm that "turbolinks:load" event works in Rails 4.2? The turbolinks: event prefix was introduced in the New Turbolinks and isn't used in Rails 4.2 IIRC which uses Turbolinks Classic. Consider trying "page:change" if "turbolinks:load" doesn't work on your pre-Rails 5 app. See guides.rubyonrails.org/v4.2.7/… Aug 7, 2016 at 12:45
  • 1
    @EliotSykes The guide has not been updated. Rails 4.2 now uses github.com/turbolinks/turbolinks instead of turbolinks-classic. And in any case, this depends on what you have specified in your Gemfile. Hope you will confirm the same soon :) Aug 8, 2016 at 5:43
  • 3
    Thanks @vedant1811. At time of writing, I'm confirming that a new Rails 4.2.7 app uses Turbolinks 5 (not turbolinks-classic). Developers reading this - check your Gemfile.lock for the turbolinks version used. If it is less then 5.0 then use page:change or upgrade turbolinks. Also found this, may be relevant to some, where turbolinks translates events to the old event names: github.com/turbolinks/turbolinks/blob/v5.0.0/src/turbolinks/… Aug 8, 2016 at 17:05
  • 1
    Does the alert "page has loaded!" need to be indented to be actually run by the callback function?
    – mbigras
    Feb 13, 2017 at 6:09
10

NOTE: See @SDP's answer for a clean, built-in solution

I fixed it as follows:

make sure you include application.js before the other app dependent js files get included by changing the include order as follows:

// in application.js - make sure `require_self` comes before `require_tree .`
//= require_self
//= require_tree .

Define a global function that handles the binding in application.js

// application.js
window.onLoad = function(callback) {
  // binds ready event and turbolink page:load event
  $(document).ready(callback);
  $(document).on('page:load',callback);
};

Now you can bind stuff like:

// in coffee script:
onLoad ->
  $('a.clickable').click => 
    alert('link clicked!');

// equivalent in javascript:
onLoad(function() {
  $('a.clickable').click(function() {
    alert('link clicked');
});
6
  • 2
    This seems the cleanest since you only have to add this in one place, not every coffeescript file. Nice work!
    – pyrospade
    Oct 31, 2013 at 3:42
  • @sled So is this saying to use SDP's method of using the gem and this code? Or is this an answer that doesn't use the gem?
    – ahnbizcad
    Aug 18, 2014 at 8:24
  • forget this answer and use SDP's solution.
    – sled
    Aug 18, 2014 at 8:43
  • @sled Is it possible to combine SDP's solution with the notion of putting the call only in one place?
    – ahnbizcad
    Aug 18, 2014 at 8:58
  • 1
    @gwho: As SDP's answer shows, turbolinks hooks up to the ready event, this means you can use the "standard" way of initializing: $(document).ready(function() { /* do your init here */});. Your init code should be called when the complete page is loaded (-> without turbolinks) and your init code should be executed again when you load a page via turbolinks. If you want to execute some code ONLY when a turbolink has been used: $(document).on('page:load', function() { /* init only for turbolinks */});
    – sled
    Aug 18, 2014 at 9:05
9

None of the above works for me, I solved this by not using jQuery's $(document).ready, but use addEventListener instead.

document.addEventListener("turbolinks:load", function() {
  // do something
});
7
$(document).on 'ready turbolinks:load', ->
  console.log '(document).turbolinks:load'
1
  • That is the only solution that works for me on every and each browser, for Turbolinks >= 5 and that triggers both on first page load and also when you click any links (with turbolinks). That is the case because while Chrome triggers turbolinks:load on the very first page load, Safari does not and the hacky way to fix it (triggering turbolinks:load on application.js) obviously breaks Chrome (which fires twice with this). This is the correct answer. Definitely go with the 2 events ready and turbolinks:load. May 1, 2018 at 18:54
5

You have to use:

document.addEventListener("turbolinks:load", function() {
  // your code here
})

from turbolinks doc.

3

Either use the

$(document).on "page:load", attachRatingHandler

or use jQuery's .on function to achieve the same effect

$(document).on 'click', 'span.star', attachRatingHandler

see here for more details: http://srbiv.github.io/2013/04/06/rails-4-my-first-run-in-with-turbolinks.html

2

Instead of using a variable to save the "ready" function and bind it to the events, you might want to trigger the ready event whenever page:load triggers.

$(document).on('page:load', function() {
  $(document).trigger('ready');
});
2

Here's what I have done to ensure things aren't executed twice:

$(document).on("page:change", function() {
     // ... init things, just do not bind events ...
     $(document).off("page:change");
});

I find using the jquery-turbolinks gem or combining $(document).ready and $(document).on("page:load") or using $(document).on("page:change") by itself behaves unexpectedly--especially if you're in development.

2
  • Do you mind explaining what you mean by behaves unexpectedly? Apr 30, 2015 at 19:08
  • If I have just a simple alert without the $(document).off bit in that anonymous "page:change" function above it will obviously alert when I get to that page. But at least in development running WEBrick, it will also alert when I click a link to another page. Event worse, it alerts twice when I then click a link back to the original page. May 12, 2015 at 21:58
2

I found the following article which worked great for me and details the use of the following:

var load_this_javascript = function() { 
  // do some things 
}
$(document).ready(load_this_javascript)
$(window).bind('page:change', load_this_javascript)
2

I figured I'd leave this here for those upgrading to Turbolinks 5: the easiest way to fix your code is to go from:

var ready;
ready = function() {
  // Your JS here
}
$(document).ready(ready);
$(document).on('page:load', ready)

to:

var ready;
ready = function() {
  // Your JS here
}
$(document).on('turbolinks:load', ready);

Reference: https://github.com/turbolinks/turbolinks/issues/9#issuecomment-184717346

2
$(document).ready(ready)  

$(document).on('turbolinks:load', ready)
4
  • 2
    While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion.
    – andreas
    Oct 14, 2016 at 19:52
  • 4
    Actually, this answer is incorrect. The turbolinks:load event fires for the initial page load as well as after following links. If you attach an event both to the standard ready event and the turbolinks:load event, it will fire twice when you first visit a page. Nov 13, 2016 at 10:06
  • This answer is incorrect. As @alexanderbird said, it causes ready to fire twice on subsequent page loads. Please change or remove it.
    – chester
    Feb 13, 2017 at 23:25
  • @alexanderbird Your comment solved one of the problem for me
    – Anwar
    May 13, 2017 at 7:12
1

Tested so many solution finally came to this. This many your code is definitely not called twice.

      var has_loaded=false;
      var ready = function() {
        if(!has_loaded){
          has_loaded=true;
           
          // YOURJS here
        }
      }

      $(document).ready(ready);
      $(document).bind('page:change', ready);

1

I usually do the following for my rails 4 projects:

In application.js

function onInit(callback){
    $(document).ready(callback);
    $(document).on('page:load', callback);
}

Then in the rest of the .js files, instead of using $(function (){}) I call onInit(function(){})

0

First, install jquery-turbolinks gem. And then, don't forget to move your included Javascript files from end of body of your application.html.erb to its <head>.

As described here, if you have put the application javascript link in the footer for speed optimization reasons, you will need to move it into the tag so that it loads before the content in the tag. This solution worked for me.

0

I found my functions doubled when using a function for ready and turbolinks:load so I used,

var ready = function() {
  // you code goes here
}

if (Turbolinks.supported == false) {
  $(document).on('ready', ready);
};
if (Turbolinks.supported == true) {
  $(document).on('turbolinks:load', ready);
};

That way your functions don't double if turbolinks is supported!

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