15

I have 2 branches a master and an experimental. A shown:

master-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-Y
                  \
                   -x-x-x-x

My experimental is quite outdated and i was hoping to update it by simply copying the last commit in the master branch (Y) to experimental:

master-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-Y
                  \
                   -x-x-x-x-Y

If possible, I don't want to have to do any merging I want to overwrite anything in the experimental (master is my main priority).

Edit: Let me briefly explain the situation: When i try to merge commits at the tips of the master and experimental branch, I get a lot of merge conflicts! The same happens if i try to cherry-pick from the experimental onto the master! I was hoping to avoid them as i simply don't want any of the changes on the experimental! Up until now, I have been cherry-picking from master to experimental and when there are merge conflicts, I just keep changes of master branch. But after doing it many times, i was hoping that there may be some way in which i can do something like a merge except where (i am not prompted with any merge conflicts as master changes is all i need (for all I know it wouldn't matter what was previously on the experimental branch!

2 Answers 2

23

To cherry-pick just commit Y from master onto experimental:

git checkout experimental
git cherry-pick Y

Alternatively:

git checkout experimental
git cherry-pick master

...Will apply the change introduced by the commit at the tip of the master branch and create a new commit in experimental with this change.

4
  • 1
    I am sorry but i have to merge if i follow your instructions. I was hoping to be able to do so without a merge!
    – reubenjohn
    Commented Sep 12, 2013 at 19:25
  • @reubenjohn: Then I'm afraid I don't understand what you mean by "simply copying the last commit in the master branch (Y) to experimental".
    – johnsyweb
    Commented Sep 12, 2013 at 19:28
  • 1
    @reubenjohn take a short time h to learn more about cherry pick and merge, it's two different things
    – CharlesB
    Commented Sep 12, 2013 at 19:35
  • 1
    @CharlesB I do know the difference between cherry-pick and merge, but unfortunately I have mislead you with a bad question! There has been a misunderstanding for which i have edited my question!
    – reubenjohn
    Commented Sep 13, 2013 at 17:45
3

Here is what I initially tried!:

git checkout experimental
git rebase --onto <COMMIT ID OF LAST MASTER COMMIT> experimental

On trying this code, I found that not only the commit at the tip of the master but also the entire experimental branch became a clone of the master! Yes, it is not an elegant solution and a bad usage of git!

However, as pointed out by @Johnsyweb, the optimum solution would be to do a merge of experimental and master but,

with Git preferring to take the changes on master over the changes on experimental

Hence doing a:

git checkout experimental
git merge -Xtheirs master

should work fine. Although it says merge, since it only considers the changes of the experimental branch over the master one, it is more like a copy from experimental to master for all practical purposes.
(See a similar discussion here)

1
  • 1
    I'm not sure what you expected git rebase to do, but that looks right to me. It looks to me that you want to merge all of the changes on master, since the branch-point, into experimental but with Git preferring to take the changes on master over the changes on experimental where conflicts exist. Something like this: stackoverflow.com/a/3364506/78845
    – johnsyweb
    Commented Sep 13, 2013 at 23:20

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