41

I created an array of objects like so:

var places = [];
var a = {};
a.lat = 12.123;
a.lng = 13.213;
a.city = "New York";

places.push(a);

var b = {};
b.lat = 3.123;
b.lng = 2.213;
b.city = "New York";

places.push(b);

...

I'm trying to create a new array that filters the places to only contains objects that don't have the same city property (lat/lng duplicates are ok). Is there a built in JS or Jquery function to achieve this?

  • Yes, look into [].forEach() or the for loop. – Kevin B Sep 12 '13 at 20:30
  • 1
    Looks custom. How do you determine which one should be thrown out? a or b? Write a custom function to introduce this logic. – Travis J Sep 12 '13 at 20:31
  • I would first sort the array by the city name, then iterate over them one by one removing duplicates as i find them. If you don't sort it first, you'll have to iterate the whole array for each entry in the array. – Kevin B Sep 12 '13 at 20:32
  • 2
    I would use names of the cities as an object's properties. – undefined Sep 12 '13 at 20:32
  • A 'set' might help you: stackoverflow.com/questions/7958292/… – Robb Sep 12 '13 at 20:34

16 Answers 16

54

I'd probably use a flags object during the filtering, like this:

var flags = {};
var newPlaces = places.filter(function(entry) {
    if (flags[entry.city]) {
        return false;
    }
    flags[entry.city] = true;
    return true;
});

That uses Array#filter from ECMAScript5 (ES5), which is one of the ES5 additions that can be shimmed (search for "es5 shim" for several options).

You can do it without filter, of course, it's just a bit more verbose:

var flags = {};
var newPlaces = [];
var index;
for (index = 0; index < places.length; ++index) {
    if (!flags[entry.city]) {
        flags[entry.city] = true;
        newPlaces.push(entry);
    }
});

Both of the above assume the first object with a given city should be kept, and all other discarded.


Note: As user2736012 points out below, my test if (flags[entry.city]) will be true for cities with names that happen to be the same as properties that exist on Object.prototype such as toString. Very unlikely in this case, but there are four ways to avoid the possibility:

  • (My usual preferred solution) Create the object without a prototype: var flags = Object.create(null);. This is a feature of ES5. Note that this cannot be shimmed for obsolete browsers like IE8 (the single-argument version of Object.create can be except when that argument's value is null).

  • Use hasOwnProperty for the test, e.g. if (flags.hasOwnProperty(entry.city))

  • Put a prefix on that you know doesn't exist for any Object.prototype property, such as xx:

    var key = "xx" + entry.city;
    if (flags[key]) {
        // ...
    }
    flags[key] = true;
    
  • As of ES2015, you could use a Set instead:

    const flags = new Set();
    const newPlaces = places.filter(entry => {
        if (flags.has(entry.city)) {
            return false;
        }
        flags.add(entry.city);
        return true;
    });
    
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    While it's highly unlikely that there'll be a city named "toString" or any other Object.prototype property, it's still not a bad idea to use .hasOwnProperty() for this. – user2736012 Sep 12 '13 at 20:38
  • 2
    Yeah, it's a little paranoid. I'll admit that, certainly for this case. It does make it a safer generic solution though. – user2736012 Sep 12 '13 at 20:40
  • 1
    @undefined: Yeah, but I think user's point is that if you generalize this, it's possible. I wouldn't be surprised to find a case where someone generalized the technique and got bit by the constructor property, for instance. He/she made a quite useful point. – T.J. Crowder Sep 12 '13 at 20:43
  • @undefined: "...it's highly unlikely that there'll be a city named "toString" or any other Object.prototype property..." – user2736012 Sep 12 '13 at 20:44
  • 1
    @undefined: Sorry, I missed the joke. I've been thinking about politics today, which gets me grumpy! ;-) – user2736012 Sep 12 '13 at 20:50
40

Shortest, but not best performance (see update bellow) solution for es6 :

function unique(array, propertyName) {
   return array.filter((e, i) => array.findIndex(a => a[propertyName] === e[propertyName]) === i);
}

performance: https://jsperf.com/compare-unique-array-by-property

| improve this answer | |
  • Update 19.08.2018: In Chrome 67.0.3396 / Mac OS X 10.13.6 got a best performance score of 2 other variants suggested here. Check performance in your target browsers before use. – IgorL Jul 19 '18 at 8:01
  • 3
    you're insanely genius! – Chaitanya Chauhan Oct 23 '18 at 5:13
  • 1
    @M.A.Naseer sorry, do now know why the link removed, cannot restore. – IgorL Mar 26 at 7:33
5

https://lodash.com/docs#uniqBy

https://github.com/lodash/lodash/blob/4.13.1/lodash.js#L7711

/**
 * This method is like `_.uniq` except that it accepts `iteratee` which is
 * invoked for each element in `array` to generate the criterion by which
 * uniqueness is computed. The iteratee is invoked with one argument: (value).
 *
 * @static
 * @memberOf _
 * @since 4.0.0
 * @category Array
 * @param {Array} array The array to inspect.
 * @param {Array|Function|Object|string} [iteratee=_.identity]
 *  The iteratee invoked per element.
 * @returns {Array} Returns the new duplicate free array.
 * @example
 *
 * _.uniqBy([2.1, 1.2, 2.3], Math.floor);
 * // => [2.1, 1.2]
 *
 * // The `_.property` iteratee shorthand.
 * _.uniqBy([{ 'x': 1 }, { 'x': 2 }, { 'x': 1 }], 'x');
 * // => [{ 'x': 1 }, { 'x': 2 }]
 */
| improve this answer | |
4

I expanded a bit on @IgorL solution, but extended prototype and gave it a selector function instead of a property to make it a little more flexible:

Array.prototype.unique = function(selector) {
   return this.filter((e, i) => this.findIndex((a) => {
      if (selector) {
        return selector(a) === selector(e);
      }
      return a === e;
    }) === i);
};

Usage:

// with no param it uses strict equals (===) against the object
let primArr = ['one','one','two','three','one']
primArr.unique() // ['one','two','three']

let a = {foo:123}
let b = {foo:123}
let fooArr = [a,a,b]
fooArr.unique() //[a,b]

// alternatively, you can pass a selector function
fooArr.unique(item=>item.foo) //[{foo:123}] (first "unique" item returned)

Definitely NOT the most performant way to do this but as long as the selector is simple and the array isn't massive, it should work fine.

In Typescript

Array.prototype.unique = function<T>(this: T[], selector?: (item: T) => object): T[] {
   return this.filter((e, i) => this.findIndex((a) => {
      if (selector) {
        return selector(a) === selector(e);
      }
      return a === e;
    }) === i);
};
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for this. Worked perfectly in my use case! – Matt Inamdar Nov 25 '17 at 21:10
  • This is the best solution! If someone could provide the most performant way, then it would be fantastic. But in these situations making an extension to the prototype is the right way to go, and making it use a selector is also the right way to go (I'm using typescript) – Worthy7 Apr 27 '18 at 1:10
  • 1
    @Worthy7 I'm using typescript too. I added the typed version below – NSjonas Apr 27 '18 at 5:49
3

My suggestion :

Array.prototype.uniqueCity = function() {
    var processed = [];
    for (var i=this.length-1; i>=0; i--){
        if (processed.indexOf(this[i].city)<0) {
            processed.push(this[i].city);
        } else {
            this.splice(i, 1);
        }
    }
}

in use :

places.uniqueCity();

or

Array.prototype.uniqueObjectArray = function(field) {
    var processed = [];
    for (var i=this.length-1; i>=0; i--) {
        if (this[i].hasOwnProperty(field)) {
            if (processed.indexOf(this[i][field])<0) {
                processed.push(this[i][field]);
            } else {
                this.splice(i, 1);
            }
        }
    }
}

places.uniqueObjectArray('city');

With the above you can sort the array by any of the fields in the objects, even if they are not present for some of the objects.

or

function uniqueCity(array) {
    var processed = [];
    for (var i=array.length-1; i>=0; i--){
        if (processed.indexOf(array[i].city)<0) {
            processed.push(array[i].city);
        } else {
            array.splice(i, 1);
        }
    }
    return array;
}

places = uniqueCity(places);
| improve this answer | |
  • 6
    One does not simply play with a prototype just to add such specific function. – Jakub Michálek Sep 12 '13 at 20:46
  • I have to agree with @JakubMichálek. It's not that it's bad, but it just seems a little too specific for a .prototype method. Not a technical problem, more of a conceptual one, which is subjective. – user2736012 Sep 12 '13 at 20:49
  • 2
    If you make it general, like prototype.unique and add some support say for specifying the key like function(key) { ... }, then I think it would be ok, but this seems little silly to me. – Jakub Michálek Sep 12 '13 at 20:50
  • 1
    It doesnt matter to extend prototype when @theblueone will be perfectly aware of hos own code, in that particular project. It would not be a good idea if you made some open source library intended to be used broad or anywhere. then you should think twice. – davidkonrad Sep 12 '13 at 20:53
  • Other problem with this is that it operates in O(n^2) time. .indexOf() will also iterate over the full processed array, and the processed array which you are using .indexOf() on will likely grow to be about the same length as the original array by the time you are done. This is how you end up with almost O(n^2) time in the worst case scenario (which is when there are no duplicates). In the best case scenario (all duplicates) you will get O(n) time. The accepted answer, which uses a lookup table, will always get close to O(n) time. – Conor Mancone May 19 '17 at 14:57
3

Another option:

const uniqueBy = prop => list => {
    const uniques = {}
    return list.reduce(
        (result, item) => {
            if (uniques[item[prop]]) return result
            uniques[item[prop]] = item
            return [...result, item]
        },
        [],
    )
}

const uniqueById = uniqueBy('id')

uniqueById([
    { id: 1, name: 'one' },
    { id: 2, name: 'two' },
    { id: 1, name: 'one' },
    { id: 3, name: 'three' }
])

You can paste it on your console to see it working. It should work for the scenario presented and a few others.

| improve this answer | |
2

You could use a Map so the entries with the same key property (in your case 'city') only appear once

module.exports = (array, prop) => {
   const keyValueArray = array.map(entry => [entry[prop], entry]);
   const map = new Map(keyValueArray);
   return Array.from(map.values());
};

More info about Map and array objects here

Basic example on Codepen

| improve this answer | |
1

As pointed out in the comments, you could use an object as a map, which will allow you to avoid duplicates, you can then enumerate the properties of the object.

working fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/gPRPQ/1/

var places = [];
var a = {};
a.lat = 12.123;
a.lng = 13.213;
a.city = "New York";

places.push(a);

var b = {};
b.lat = 3.123;
b.lng = 2.213;
b.city = "New York";

places.push(b);

var unique = {}

for (var i = 0; i < places.length; i++) {
    var place = places[i];
    unique[place.city] = place;
}

for (var name in unique) {
    var place = unique[name];
    console.log(place);
}
| improve this answer | |
1
var places = [];
var a = {};
a.lat = 12.123;
a.lng = 13.213;
a.city = "New York";

places.push(a);

var b = {};
b.lat = 3.123;
b.lng = 2.213;
b.city = "New York";

places.push(b);

getUniqAR(places,'city'); //Return Uniq Array by property

function getUniqAR(Data,filter){
var uniar =[];
Data.forEach(function(item,ind,arr){
    var dupi=false;
    if(!uniar.length) uniar.push(item) //push first obj into uniq array 
    uniar.forEach(function(item2, ind2,arr){
    if(item2[filter] == item[filter]){  //check each obj prop of uniq array 
      dupi=true; //if values are same put duplicate is true
        }     
    })
if(!dupi){  uniar.push(item)} //if no duplicate insert to uniq

})
console.log(uniar)
return uniar;
}
| improve this answer | |
0

In simple Javascript code to remove duplicate cities from places array list is

var places = [{ 'lat': 12.123, 'lng': 13.213, 'city': "New York"},
                { 'lat': 3.123, 'lng': 2.213, 'city': "New York"},
                { 'lat': 43.123, 'lng': 12.213, 'city': "London"}];
var unique = [];
var tempArr = [];
places.forEach((value, index) => {
    if (unique.indexOf(value.city) === -1) {
        unique.push(value.city);
    } else {
        tempArr.push(index);    
    }
});
tempArr.reverse();
tempArr.forEach(ele => {
    places.splice(ele, 1);
});
console.log(places);
| improve this answer | |
0

Generic Typescript answer based on https://stackoverflow.com/a/18773857/49564 above:

export function isDistinct<T>(mapper: (value: T) => string): (value: T) => boolean {
  const keys: { [index: string]: boolean } = {};

  return (entry: T) => {
    const key = mapper(entry);

    if (keys[key] !== undefined) {
      return false;
    }

    return keys[key] = true;
  };
}

// Usage example:
const items = [ { id: 1 }, { id: 2 }, { id: 3 }, { id: 1 } ];
const unique = items.filter(isDistinct(i => i.id));
| improve this answer | |
0

I think you want this,

NOTE: No library is required.

let array = [{ id: 1}, {id: 2}, {id: 3}];

function addUniqeObj(data) {
  let index = -1;

  for(let i = 0, i < array.length; i++) {
    if(array[i].id === data.id) {
      index = i;
    }
  }

  if(index > -1) {
    array[index] = data;
  } else {
    array.push(data)
  }

}
| improve this answer | |
0

We can create the list of unique objects by any property using JavaScript Map.

For example :

var places = [{ 'lat': 12.123, 'lng': 13.213, 'city': "New York"},
                { 'lat': 3.123, 'lng': 2.213, 'city': "New York"},
                { 'lat': 43.123, 'lng': 12.213, 'city': "London"}];
                
var cityMap = new Map();
places.forEach(p=> cityMap.set(p.city, p));

console.log([...cityMap.values()]);

Execute code snippet to see the result.

| improve this answer | |
0

Another variation of the rafaelbiten approach:

const dedupExample = [
    {id: 1, c: 'whatever'},
    {id: 1, c: '1whatever'},
    {id: 2, c: '2whatever'},
    {id: 2, c: '2whatever'},
    {id: 3, c: '2whatever'},
]

const getUniqueBy = (prop, list) => {
    const objUniq = list.reduce((res, item) => ({ ...res, [item[prop]]: item }), {})
    return Object.keys(objUniq).map(item => objUniq[item])
}

const uniq = getUniqueBy('id', dedupExample)

console.info('info', { uniq })
   /* [
    {id: 1, c: 'whatever'},
    {id: 2, c: '2whatever'},
    {id: 3, c: '2whatever'},
  ] */

| improve this answer | |
0

You can filter using a Set by only including elements with a property value that has not yet been added to the Set (after which it should be added to the Set). This can be accomplished in one line using the logical and operator (&&).

Below is a general function to obtain a unique array of objects (arr) based on a specific property (prop). Note that in the case of duplicates, only the first object with the property value will be retained.

const getUniqueBy = (arr, prop) => {
  const set = new Set;
  return arr.filter(o => !set.has(o[prop]) && set.add(o[prop]));
};

Demo:

var places = [{
  lat: 12.123,
  lng: 13.213,
  city: 'New York'
}, {
  lat: 3.123,
  lng: 2.213,
  city: 'New York'
}, {
  lat: 3.123,
  lng: 4.123,
  city: 'Some City'
}];
const getUniqueBy = (arr, prop) => {
  const set = new Set;
  return arr.filter(o => !set.has(o[prop]) && set.add(o[prop]));
};
console.log(getUniqueBy(places, 'city'));

| improve this answer | |
-1

This thread may be old but thought I should share it. It is based on Pure JavaScript and removes Duplicate Objects based on the Properties Specified.

function removeDuplicates(originalArray, properties) {
  var newArray = [];
  var index = 0;
  var lookupObject = {};
  var totalProperties = properties.length;

  for (var i = 0; i < originalArray.length; i++) {
    var exists = false;

    for (var a = 0; a < newArray.length; a++) {
      var propsFound = 0;
      for (var b = 0; b < totalProperties; b++) {
        if (originalArray[i][properties[b]] == newArray[a][properties[b]]) {
          propsFound++;
        }
      }

      //If there is a match then break the for loop
      if (propsFound == totalProperties) {
        exists = true;
        break;
      }
    } //End of New Array

    if (!exists) {
      newArray[index] = originalArray[i];
      index++;
    }
  } //End of originalArray

  return newArray;
}

You can view the fiddle here

| improve this answer | |

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