2

In the following code sample:

   Session session = getSessionFactory().openSession();

   MyObject currentState = (MyObject) 
           session.get(MyObject.class, id, new LockOptions(LockMode.???));

   if (!statusToUpdateTo.equals(currentState.getStatus())) {
     tx = session.beginTransaction();

     currentState.setStatus(statusToUpdateTo);
     session.save(currentState);

     tx.commit();
   }

   session.close();

As you might hopefully interpret from the code, the idea is to check our store and find an object with a given id, then update it to a given status. If we find that the object is already in the status we want to update to, we abandon doing anything. Otherwise, we update the status and save it back to the store.

The worry I've got is that what if several of these requests come through at once, and all try to read and update the same object? Looking through the doco it would seem like Hibernate "usually obtains exactly the right lock level automatically." (LockMode.class) but I'm still keen to ensure that only one thing can read the object, make the decision that it needs to update it, and then update it - without any other threads doing the same to the same database entry.

From the LockMode class I think PESSIMISTIC_WRITE is what I'm after, but can't seem to find a documentation resource that confirms this. Is anyone able to confirm this for me, and that the above code will do what I'm after?

  • 2
    yes, you want PESSIMISTIC_WRITE. – jtahlborn Sep 13 '13 at 2:28
  • Thanks! Good to know I'm on the right track. So I guess that leads to another question, then - when is that lock released? I seem to observe that a lock is released on commit(), but strangely enough it doesn't seem to be released on session.close()... This doesn't make much sense to me - if you're not going to commit() [ie in the case where I don't enter the if above] then how do you explicitly release the lock? – f1dave Sep 13 '13 at 2:58
  • 1
    you don't typically release database locks in a transaction once you get them (not sure if dbs typically support this). you either need to commit or rollback the transaction to release the lock. if you have other work that needs to be continued, then you probably need to handle this locking in a separate transaction. – jtahlborn Sep 13 '13 at 3:28
  • That makes sense... I guess the problem here is that the lock is obtained before the transaction begins, if I'm following your terminology. I've been able to demonstrate that by changing the above code to include an else that begins and then rolls back a transaction, the lock is released. But that just seems a little... odd to me. I might add an answer to my own question that demonstrates what I did and observed. – f1dave Sep 13 '13 at 3:48
  • 1
    if you are not acquiring the lock in an explicitly controlled transaction, then you really have no idea how long that lock will be in effect. if your db connection is using some form of auto-commit, you could lose the lock at any time. – jtahlborn Sep 13 '13 at 13:57
4

So I noticed in my original code that upon session close, a lock was still left on the database, as subsequent calls to delete the rows I'd inserted didn't complete when tx.commit() was called on them.

After adding the following else block, my tests pass which I infer as meaning the lock has been released (as these rows are now being cleaned up).

   Session session = getSessionFactory().openSession();

   MyObject currentState = (MyObject) 
           session.get(MyObject.class, id, 
                       new LockOptions(LockMode.PESSIMISTIC_WRITE));

   if (!statusToUpdateTo.equals(currentState.getStatus())) {
     tx = session.beginTransaction();

     currentState.setStatus(statusToUpdateTo);
     session.save(currentState);

     tx.commit();
   } else {
     // Seems to clear lock
     tx = session.beginTransaction();
     tx.rollback();
   }

   session.close();

To me, this obviously reflects my lack of understanding about Hibernate's locking mechanisms, but it does seem slightly strange that one can get a lock using session.get(...) or session.load(...) and then not release a lock using session itself, but rather only through creating a transaction and committing/rolling back.

Of course, I could just be misunderstanding the observed behaviour :)

  • 1
    Hibernate's doco about Session.close(): End the session by releasing the JDBC connection and cleaning up. and it has not stated anything about connection, so when you close your session, it is entirely up to connection provider whether or not and when commits (or rolls back) the connection. That's why you need to do it through a TX manually. Generally session is a unit of your work which can be out of sync with the underlying connection. – Ean V Sep 13 '13 at 5:12

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