366

How do I implement the following (Python pseudocode) in C++?

if argv[1].startswith('--foo='):
    foo_value = int(argv[1][len('--foo='):])

(For example, if argv[1] is --foo=98, then foo_value is 98.)

Update: I'm hesitant to look into Boost, since I'm just looking at making a very small change to a simple little command-line tool (I'd rather not have to learn how to link in and use Boost for a minor change).

3

23 Answers 23

720

Use rfind overload that takes the search position pos parameter, and pass zero for it:

std::string s = "tititoto";
if (s.rfind("titi", 0) == 0) { // pos=0 limits the search to the prefix
  // s starts with prefix
}

Who needs anything else? Pure STL!

Many have misread this to mean "search backwards through the whole string looking for the prefix". That would give the wrong result (e.g. string("tititito").rfind("titi") returns 2 so when compared against == 0 would return false) and it would be inefficient (looking through the whole string instead of just the start). But it does not do that because it passes the pos parameter as 0, which limits the search to only match at that position or earlier. For example:

std::string test = "0123123";
size_t match1 = test.rfind("123");    // returns 4 (rightmost match)
size_t match2 = test.rfind("123", 2); // returns 1 (skipped over later match)
size_t match3 = test.rfind("123", 0); // returns std::string::npos (i.e. not found)
5
  • 2
    @sweisgerber.dev, I'm confused on your first contention. The return value from find will only be zero if titi is at the start of the string. If it's found somewhere else, you'll get a non-zero return value and, if it's not found, you'll get npos which is also non-zero. Assuming I'm right, I'd prefer this answer since I don't have to bring in any non-standard stuff (yes, I know Boost is everywhere, I'd just prefer core C++ libs for simple stuff like this).
    – paxdiablo
    Jun 27, 2017 at 2:29
  • @paxdiablo: you are right, it does indeed check if it starts with titi, but the conversion part is missing. Jun 27, 2017 at 9:07
  • 3
    Do we have any evidence that this is optimized in most compilers? I don't find elsewhere mentioning either "find" or "rfind" optimization is common practice based on the return value it's checking against.
    – Superziyi
    Mar 26, 2019 at 18:49
  • 8
    @alcoforado "rfind will start from the back of the string ..." No, that only applies to the overload of rfind() that does not take a pos parameter. If you use the overload that does take a pos parameter then it will not search the whole string, only that position and earlier. (Just like regular find() with pos parameter only looks in that position or later.) So if you pass pos == 0, as shown in this answer, then it will literally only consider for matches at that one position. That was already explaining in both the answer and comments. Jun 1, 2020 at 14:08
  • that position or earlier is the important phrase here. Sep 27, 2021 at 18:59
205

You would do it like this:

std::string prefix("--foo=");
if (!arg.compare(0, prefix.size(), prefix))
    foo_value = std::stoi(arg.substr(prefix.size()));

Looking for a lib such as Boost.ProgramOptions that does this for you is also a good idea.

5
  • 7
    The biggest problem with this is that atoi("123xyz") returns 123, whereas Python's int("123xyz") throws an exception.
    – Tom
    Dec 10, 2009 at 3:31
  • The workaround, we can do, is to a sscanf() and compare the result and the original, to decide whether to proceed or throw exception. Dec 10, 2009 at 6:20
  • 1
    Or just replace atoi with strtol or strtoll, which lets us detect error conditions in the input value.
    – Tom
    Dec 12, 2009 at 0:43
  • 1
    This is better solution than the rfind one which depends on optimization to work.
    – Calmarius
    Sep 19, 2019 at 15:19
  • 1
    @Calmarius the rfind solution does not depend on any optimization. rfind's behavior by definition is to only look at a single index when given pos=0, hence it is always an efficient check. Which syntax is more pleasant is a matter of preference.
    – Yuval
    Sep 11, 2020 at 0:26
164

Just for completeness, I will mention the C way to do it:

If str is your original string, substr is the substring you want to check, then

strncmp(str, substr, strlen(substr))

will return 0 if str starts with substr. The functions strncmp and strlen are in the C header file <string.h>

(originally posted by Yaseen Rauf here, markup added)

For a case-insensitive comparison, use strnicmp instead of strncmp.

This is the C way to do it, for C++ strings you can use the same function like this:

strncmp(str.c_str(), substr.c_str(), substr.size())
3
  • 16
    indeed, everyone seems to just go "use boost" and i for one am thankful for an stl or OS library version
    – Force Gaia
    Apr 25, 2018 at 10:44
  • 1
    Yes. However, it assumes the string has no null characters in it. If it is not the case - one should use memcmp()
    – Avishai Y
    Aug 14, 2019 at 6:54
  • 1
    why would anyone use anything other than this simple beautiful solution? Oct 15, 2019 at 12:43
93

If you're already using Boost, you can do it with boost string algorithms + boost lexical cast:

#include <boost/algorithm/string/predicate.hpp>
#include <boost/lexical_cast.hpp>

try {    
    if (boost::starts_with(argv[1], "--foo="))
        foo_value = boost::lexical_cast<int>(argv[1]+6);
} catch (boost::bad_lexical_cast) {
    // bad parameter
}

This kind of approach, like many of the other answers provided here is ok for very simple tasks, but in the long run you are usually better off using a command line parsing library. Boost has one (Boost.Program_options), which may make sense if you happen to be using Boost already.

Otherwise a search for "c++ command line parser" will yield a number of options.

11
  • 129
    Pulling in huge dependencies for a string prefix check is like shooting birds with canons.
    – Tobi
    May 29, 2016 at 17:27
  • 173
    "Use Boost" is always the wrong answer when someone asks how to do a simple string operation in C++. Aug 21, 2016 at 1:20
  • 98
    minus 1 for suggesting Boost
    – uglycoyote
    Oct 27, 2016 at 22:51
  • 46
    Using boost here is right, if you already use boost in your project.
    – Alex Che
    May 12, 2017 at 9:30
  • 27
    The answer is prefixed with "If you're using Boost...". Clearly this is the right answer "...if you're using Boost". If not, look the suggestion by @Thomas
    – NuSkooler
    Feb 16, 2018 at 21:44
88

Code I use myself:

std::string prefix = "-param=";
std::string argument = argv[1];
if(argument.substr(0, prefix.size()) == prefix) {
    std::string argumentValue = argument.substr(prefix.size());
}
4
  • 3
    the most concise and only depends on std::string, except remove the optional and misleading argument.size() at the end of the final substr.
    – Ben Bryant
    Apr 6, 2012 at 15:50
  • @ben-bryant: Thanks for the heads up. Didn't know it was optional. Apr 24, 2012 at 22:07
  • 19
    Using substr leads to unnecessary copying. The str.compare(start, count, substr) method used in Thomas' answer is more efficient. razvanco13's answer has another method which avoids copying by using std::equal. Sep 25, 2013 at 18:57
  • 4
    @HüseyinYağlı Thomas uses atoi which is only for windows Huh? atoi has been a C standard library function since... ever. In point of fact, atoi is bad- not because it's Windows-specific- but because it's (1) C, not C++, and (2) deprecated even in C (you should be using strtol or one of the other, related functions. Because atoi has no error handling. But, again, that's only in C, anyway). Nov 3, 2015 at 3:10
53

Nobody used the STL algorithm/mismatch function yet. If this returns true, prefix is a prefix of 'toCheck':

std::mismatch(prefix.begin(), prefix.end(), toCheck.begin()).first == prefix.end()

Full example prog:

#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    if (argc != 3) {
        std::cerr << "Usage: " << argv[0] << " prefix string" << std::endl
                  << "Will print true if 'prefix' is a prefix of string" << std::endl;
        return -1;
    }
    std::string prefix(argv[1]);
    std::string toCheck(argv[2]);
    if (prefix.length() > toCheck.length()) {
        std::cerr << "Usage: " << argv[0] << " prefix string" << std::endl
                  << "'prefix' is longer than 'string'" <<  std::endl;
        return 2;
    }
    if (std::mismatch(prefix.begin(), prefix.end(), toCheck.begin()).first == prefix.end()) {
        std::cout << '"' << prefix << '"' << " is a prefix of " << '"' << toCheck << '"' << std::endl;
        return 0;
    } else {
        std::cout << '"' << prefix << '"' << " is NOT a prefix of " << '"' << toCheck << '"' << std::endl;
        return 1;
    }
}

Edit:

As @James T. Huggett suggests, std::equal is a better fit for the question: Is A a prefix of B? and is slight shorter code:

std::equal(prefix.begin(), prefix.end(), toCheck.begin())

Full example prog:

#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
  if (argc != 3) {
    std::cerr << "Usage: " << argv[0] << " prefix string" << std::endl
              << "Will print true if 'prefix' is a prefix of string"
              << std::endl;
    return -1;
  }
  std::string prefix(argv[1]);
  std::string toCheck(argv[2]);
  if (prefix.length() > toCheck.length()) {
    std::cerr << "Usage: " << argv[0] << " prefix string" << std::endl
              << "'prefix' is longer than 'string'" << std::endl;
    return 2;
  }
  if (std::equal(prefix.begin(), prefix.end(), toCheck.begin())) {
    std::cout << '"' << prefix << '"' << " is a prefix of " << '"' << toCheck
              << '"' << std::endl;
    return 0;
  } else {
    std::cout << '"' << prefix << '"' << " is NOT a prefix of " << '"'
              << toCheck << '"' << std::endl;
    return 1;
  }
}
4
  • 2
    Why not use std::equal? May 21, 2015 at 12:04
  • Sounds good to me. It would be shorter code too. I spose, I'll have to edit the answer now :p
    – matiu
    May 21, 2015 at 15:16
  • 3
    Using std::equal for strings has the downside that it doesn't detect the string end, so you need to manually check whether the prefix is shorter than the whole string. (As correctly done in the example prog, but omitted in the one-liner above.) May 29, 2016 at 18:28
  • So, no benefit over rfind? Nov 10, 2017 at 10:16
32

With C++17 you can use std::basic_string_view & with C++20 std::basic_string::starts_with or std::basic_string_view::starts_with.

The benefit of std::string_view in comparison to std::string - regarding memory management - is that it only holds a pointer to a "string" (contiguous sequence of char-like objects) and knows its size. Example without moving/copying the source strings just to get the integer value:

#include <exception>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <string_view>

int main()
{
    constexpr auto argument = "--foo=42"; // Emulating command argument.
    constexpr auto prefix = "--foo=";
    auto inputValue = 0;

    constexpr auto argumentView = std::string_view(argument);
    if (argumentView.starts_with(prefix))
    {
        constexpr auto prefixSize = std::string_view(prefix).size();
        try
        {
            // The underlying data of argumentView is nul-terminated, therefore we can use data().
            inputValue = std::stoi(argumentView.substr(prefixSize).data());
        }
        catch (std::exception & e)
        {
            std::cerr << e.what();
        }
    }
    std::cout << inputValue; // 42
}
6
  • 1
    @RolandIllig No, std::atoi is completely fine. It throws exceptions on bad input (which is handled in this code). Did you have something else in mind?
    – Roi Danton
    Oct 16, 2019 at 12:09
  • Are you talking about the atoi from <cstdlib>? The documentation says "it never throws exceptions". Oct 16, 2019 at 18:47
  • @RolandIllig I'm referring to your first comment. It seems, you are mistakenly talking about atoi instead of std::atoi. The first is unsafe to use, while the latter is fine. I'm using the latter in the code here.
    – Roi Danton
    Oct 17, 2019 at 10:19
  • Please prove to me that std::atoi indeed throws an exception, by citing a suitable reference. Until you do, I don't believe you since it would be very confusing to have both ::atoi and std::atoi acting in a completely different way. Oct 17, 2019 at 18:10
  • 5
    @RolandIllig Thanks for being persistent! You are right, it was an oversight that std::atoi was used instead of std::stoi. I've fixed that.
    – Roi Danton
    Oct 18, 2019 at 12:05
26

Given that both strings — argv[1] and "--foo" — are C strings, @FelixDombek's answer is hands-down the best solution.

Seeing the other answers, however, I thought it worth noting that, if your text is already available as a std::string, then a simple, zero-copy, maximally efficient solution exists that hasn't been mentioned so far:

const char * foo = "--foo";
if (text.rfind(foo, 0) == 0)
    foo_value = text.substr(strlen(foo));

And if foo is already a string:

std::string foo("--foo");
if (text.rfind(foo, 0) == 0)
    foo_value = text.substr(foo.length());
3
  • 8
    rfind(x, 0) == 0 should really be defined in the standard as starts_with
    – porges
    Jul 1, 2016 at 0:52
  • 1
    No, because rfind() (in place of startswith()) is very inefficient - it keeps searching till the end of the string.
    – ankostis
    Apr 24, 2018 at 10:35
  • 4
    @ankostis rfind(x) searchs from the end till the start until it finds x, indeed. But rfind(x,0) starts searching from the start (position=0) till the start; so it only searches where it needs searching; does not search from/till the end. Jul 15, 2019 at 11:26
15
text.substr(0, start.length()) == start
4
  • 3
    @GregorDoroschenko it does answer the "check if string starts with another" part.
    – etarion
    Apr 13, 2018 at 13:16
  • 2
    Efficient and elegant using std::string. I learnt the most from this.
    – Michael B
    Mar 23, 2019 at 12:59
  • 1
    extra points for being a one-liner suitable for use with if (one-liner) Apr 11, 2019 at 8:48
  • @Roland Illig Why do you believe that the behaviour in that case is undefined? The expression will return false because substr returns a string of the same length as text according to en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/substr
    – Macsinus
    Jan 9, 2020 at 7:36
12

Using STL this could look like:

std::string prefix = "--foo=";
std::string arg = argv[1];
if (prefix.size()<=arg.size() && std::equal(prefix.begin(), prefix.end(), arg.begin())) {
  std::istringstream iss(arg.substr(prefix.size()));
  iss >> foo_value;
}
1
  • 2
    That should be if (prefix.size()<=arg.size() && std::equal(...)). Sep 1, 2012 at 4:52
11

At the risk of being flamed for using C constructs, I do think this sscanf example is more elegant than most Boost solutions. And you don't have to worry about linkage if you're running anywhere that has a Python interpreter!

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    for (int i = 1; i != argc; ++i) {
        int number = 0;
        int size = 0;
        sscanf(argv[i], "--foo=%d%n", &number, &size);
        if (size == strlen(argv[i])) {
            printf("number: %d\n", number);
        }
        else {
            printf("not-a-number\n");
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

Here's some example output that demonstrates the solution handles leading/trailing garbage as correctly as the equivalent Python code, and more correctly than anything using atoi (which will erroneously ignore a non-numeric suffix).

$ ./scan --foo=2 --foo=2d --foo='2 ' ' --foo=2'
number: 2
not-a-number
not-a-number
not-a-number
1
  • 7
    If argv[i] is "--foo=9999999999999999999999999", the behavior is undefined (though most or all implementations should behave sanely). I'm assuming 9999999999999999999999999 > INT_MAX. Aug 22, 2011 at 3:33
10

I use std::string::compare wrapped in utility method like below:

static bool startsWith(const string& s, const string& prefix) {
    return s.size() >= prefix.size() && s.compare(0, prefix.size(), prefix) == 0;
}
10

Starting with C++20, you can use the starts_with method.

std::string s = "abcd";
if (s.starts_with("abc")) {
    ...
}
7

In C++20 now there is starts_with available as a member function of std::string defined as:

constexpr bool starts_with(string_view sv) const noexcept;

constexpr bool starts_with(CharT c) const noexcept;

constexpr bool starts_with(const CharT* s) const;

So your code could be something like this:

std::string s{argv[1]};

if (s.starts_with("--foo="))
6

In case you need C++11 compatibility and cannot use boost, here is a boost-compatible drop-in with an example of usage:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

static bool starts_with(const std::string str, const std::string prefix)
{
    return ((prefix.size() <= str.size()) && std::equal(prefix.begin(), prefix.end(), str.begin()));
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    bool usage = false;
    unsigned int foos = 0; // default number of foos if no parameter was supplied

    if (argc > 1)
    {
        const std::string fParamPrefix = "-f="; // shorthand for foo
        const std::string fooParamPrefix = "--foo=";

        for (unsigned int i = 1; i < argc; ++i)
        {
            const std::string arg = argv[i];

            try
            {
                if ((arg == "-h") || (arg == "--help"))
                {
                    usage = true;
                } else if (starts_with(arg, fParamPrefix)) {
                    foos = std::stoul(arg.substr(fParamPrefix.size()));
                } else if (starts_with(arg, fooParamPrefix)) {
                    foos = std::stoul(arg.substr(fooParamPrefix.size()));
                }
            } catch (std::exception& e) {
                std::cerr << "Invalid parameter: " << argv[i] << std::endl << std::endl;
                usage = true;
            }
        }
    }

    if (usage)
    {
        std::cerr << "Usage: " << argv[0] << " [OPTION]..." << std::endl;
        std::cerr << "Example program for parameter parsing." << std::endl << std::endl;
        std::cerr << "  -f, --foo=N   use N foos (optional)" << std::endl;
        return 1;
    }

    std::cerr << "number of foos given: " << foos << std::endl;
}
1
  • 1
    I like to use ::compare, which gives identical result: return str.size() >= prefix.size() && str.compare(0, prefix.size(), prefix) == 0; Sep 21, 2020 at 9:03
6

C++20 update :

  • Use std::string::starts_with

https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/string/basic_string/starts_with

std::string str_value = /* smthg */;
const auto starts_with_foo = str_value.starts_with(std::string_view{"foo"});
5

Why not use gnu getopts? Here's a basic example (without safety checks):

#include <getopt.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
  option long_options[] = {
    {"foo", required_argument, 0, 0},
    {0,0,0,0}
  };

  getopt_long(argc, argv, "f:", long_options, 0);

  printf("%s\n", optarg);
}

For the following command:

$ ./a.out --foo=33

You will get

33
0
3

Ok why the complicated use of libraries and stuff? C++ String objects overload the [] operator, so you can just compare chars.. Like what I just did, because I want to list all files in a directory and ignore invisible files and the .. and . pseudofiles.

while ((ep = readdir(dp)))
{
    string s(ep->d_name);
    if (!(s[0] == '.')) // Omit invisible files and .. or .
        files.push_back(s);
}

It's that simple..

2
2

You can also use strstr:

if (strstr(str, substr) == substr) {
    // 'str' starts with 'substr'
}

but I think it's good only for short strings because it has to loop through the whole string when the string doesn't actually start with 'substr'.

1
std::string text = "--foo=98";
std::string start = "--foo=";

if (text.find(start) == 0)
{
    int n = stoi(text.substr(start.length()));
    std::cout << n << std::endl;
}
4
  • 3
    It would be great, if you avoid pasting code without code explanation. Thank you.
    – Malakai
    Oct 9, 2017 at 8:05
  • 1
    Inefficient code, would continue searching past the start of the string.
    – ankostis
    Apr 24, 2018 at 10:34
  • I was going to post the same thing. @Reborn Simple explanation: - This is the equivalent of saying if string start is found inside of string text at index 0 go into the if statement. - More specifically std::string find returns the first index of the original std::string that matches the string in parentheses. When it is equal to 0 it is the start of the string.
    – Aleksandr
    Jul 20, 2021 at 20:33
  • @ankostis this code would be very efficient since it is optimized by the compiler and improved in subsequent compiler enhancements.
    – Aleksandr
    Jul 20, 2021 at 20:33
0

With C++11 or higher you can use find() and find_first_of()

Example using find to find a single char:

#include <string>
std::string name = "Aaah";
size_t found_index = name.find('a');
if (found_index != std::string::npos) {
    // Found string containing 'a'
}

Example using find to find a full string & starting from position 5:

std::string name = "Aaah";
size_t found_index = name.find('h', 3);
if (found_index != std::string::npos) {
    // Found string containing 'h'
}

Example using the find_first_of() and only the first char, to search at the start only:

std::string name = ".hidden._di.r";
size_t found_index = name.find_first_of('.');
if (found_index == 0) {
    // Found '.' at first position in string
}

Good luck!

1
  • Why not rfind? rfind(str, 0) will not needlessly scan an entire string to make a selection as it cannot advance. See others. Dec 8, 2019 at 23:10
0

Since C++11 std::regex_search can also be used to provide even more complex expressions matching. The following example handles also floating numbers thorugh std::stof and a subsequent cast to int.

However the parseInt method shown below could throw a std::invalid_argument exception if the prefix is not matched; this can be easily adapted depending on the given application:

#include <iostream>
#include <regex>

int parseInt(const std::string &str, const std::string &prefix) {
  std::smatch match;
  std::regex_search(str, match, std::regex("^" + prefix + "([+-]?(?=\\.?\\d)\\d*(?:\\.\\d*)?(?:[Ee][+-]?\\d+)?)$"));
  return std::stof(match[1]);
}

int main() {
    std::cout << parseInt("foo=13.3", "foo=") << std::endl;
    std::cout << parseInt("foo=-.9", "foo=") << std::endl;
    std::cout << parseInt("foo=+13.3", "foo=") << std::endl;
    std::cout << parseInt("foo=-0.133", "foo=") << std::endl;
    std::cout << parseInt("foo=+00123456", "foo=") << std::endl;
    std::cout << parseInt("foo=-06.12e+3", "foo=") << std::endl;

//    throw std::invalid_argument
//    std::cout << parseInt("foo=1", "bar=") << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

The kind of magic of the regex pattern is well detailed in the following answer.

EDIT: the previous answer did not performed the conversion to integer.

0
-4
if(boost::starts_with(string_to_search, string_to_look_for))
    intval = boost::lexical_cast<int>(string_to_search.substr(string_to_look_for.length()));

This is completely untested. The principle is the same as the Python one. Requires Boost.StringAlgo and Boost.LexicalCast.

Check if the string starts with the other string, and then get the substring ('slice') of the first string and convert it using lexical cast.

0

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.