25

For example:

thisIsMySample 

should be:

this_Is_My_Sample

My code:

System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Replace(input, "([A-Z])", "_$0", System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions.Compiled);

It works fine, but if the input is changed to:

ThisIsMySample

the output will be:

_This_Is_My_Sample

How can first occurrence be ignored?

7
  • 1
    Non Regex: string result = string.Concat(input.Select((x,i) => i > 0 && char.IsUpper(x) ? "_" + x.ToString() : x.ToString())); – sa_ddam213 Sep 13 '13 at 8:11
  • 1
    @sa_ddam213 - post it as an answer please - it can be upvoted than – MikroDel Sep 13 '13 at 8:15
  • @sa_ddam213 - which one is faster? Regex or C# pure? – MikroDel Sep 13 '13 at 8:16
  • not sure, that's why I left it as a comment :) – sa_ddam213 Sep 13 '13 at 8:17
  • 1
    wow, I did a test 1,000,000 iterations Regex vs C# , Regex: 2569ms, C#: 1489ms – sa_ddam213 Sep 13 '13 at 8:25
44

Non-Regex solution

string result = string.Concat(input.Select((x,i) => i > 0 && char.IsUpper(x) ? "_" + x.ToString() : x.ToString())); 

Seems to be quite fast too: Regex: 2569ms, C#: 1489ms

Stopwatch stp = new Stopwatch();
stp.Start();
for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
{
    string input = "ThisIsMySample";
    string result = System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Replace(input, "(?<=.)([A-Z])", "_$0",
            System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions.Compiled);
}
stp.Stop();
MessageBox.Show(stp.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());
// Result 2569ms

Stopwatch stp2 = new Stopwatch();
stp2.Start();
for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
{
    string input = "ThisIsMySample";
    string result = string.Concat(input.Select((x, j) => j > 0 && char.IsUpper(x) ? "_" + x.ToString() : x.ToString()));
}
stp2.Stop();
MessageBox.Show(stp2.ElapsedMilliseconds.ToString());
// Result: 1489ms
2
  • 1
    Good one! )) and without any Regex – MikroDel Sep 13 '13 at 8:23
  • Although still faster, moving the Regex to a static, eg. private static readonly Regex CompiledRegEx = new Regex("(?<=.)([A-Z])", RegexOptions.Compiled);, reduces the execution by 300ms. Your solution, however, is still the fastest :-) – gimlichael Feb 16 '17 at 22:31
15

You can use a lookbehind to ensure that each match is preceded by at least one character:

System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Replace(input, "(?<=.)([A-Z])", "_$0",
                      System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions.Compiled);

lookaheads and lookbehinds allow you to make assertions about the text surrounding a match without including that text within the match.

0
4

Maybe like;

var str = Regex.Replace(input, "([A-Z])", "_$0", RegexOptions.Compiled);
if(str.StartsWith("_"))
   str = str.SubString(1);
3
  • thanks for your answer - its seems work! +1 Try also other variations. – MikroDel Sep 13 '13 at 8:03
  • 2
    could also use .TrimStart('_') – sa_ddam213 Sep 13 '13 at 8:12
  • 1
    @sa_ddam213 '_' is a smile ))) – MikroDel Sep 13 '13 at 8:19
3
// (Preceded by a lowercase character or digit) (a capital) => The character prefixed with an underscore
var result = Regex.Replace(input, "(?<=[a-z0-9])[A-Z]", m => "_" + m.Value);
result = result.ToLowerInvariant();
  • This works for both PascalCase and camelCase.
  • It creates no leading or trailing underscores.
  • It leaves in tact any sequences of non-word characters and underscores in the string, because they would seem intentional, e.g. __HiThere_Guys becomes __hi_there_guys.
  • Digit suffixes are (intentionally) considered part of the word, e.g. NewVersion3 becomes new_version3.
  • Digit prefixes follow the original casing, e.g. 3VersionsHere becomes 3_versions_here, but 3rdVersion becomes 3rd_version.
  • Unfortunately, capitalized two-letter acronyms (e.g. in IDNumber, where ID would be considered a separate word), as suggested in Microsoft's Capitalization Conventions, are not supported, since they conflict with other cases. I recommend, in general, to resist this guideline, as it is a seemingly arbitrary exception to the convention of not capitalizing acronyms. Stick with IdNumber.
2

Elaborating on sa_ddam213's solution, mine extends this:

public static string GetConstStyleName(this string value)
        {
            return string.Concat(value.Select((x, i) =>
            {
                //want to avoid putting underscores between pairs of upper-cases or pairs of numbers, or adding redundant underscores if they already exist.
                bool isPrevCharLower = (i == 0) ? false : char.IsLower(value[i - 1]);
                bool isPrevCharNumber = (i == 0) ? false : char.IsNumber(value[i - 1]);
                return (isPrevCharLower && (char.IsUpper(x) || char.IsNumber(x))) //lower-case followed by upper-case or number needs underscore
                    || (isPrevCharNumber && (char.IsUpper(x))) //number followed by upper-case needs underscore
                    ? "_" + x.ToString() : x.ToString();
            })).ToUpperInvariant();
        }
0
1

Use ".([A-Z])" for your regular expression, and then "_$1" for the replacement. So you use the captured string for the replacement and with the leading . you are sure you are not catching the first char of your string.

2
  • Thanks for your post! ) It doenst work - cause also other letter will be replaced with it – MikroDel Sep 13 '13 at 8:04
  • you mena 2 Replaces - like this post stackoverflow.com/a/18781117/502950 - but you were almost in the same time - upvote too ) – MikroDel Sep 13 '13 at 8:13
1

You need to modify your regex to not match the first char by defining you want to ignore the first char at all by

.([A-Z])

The above regex simply excludes every char that comes first and since it is not in the braces it would be in the matching group.

Now you need to match the second group like Bibhu noted:

System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.Replace(s, "(.)([A-Z])", "$1_$2", System.Text.RegularExpressions.RegexOptions.Compiled);
2
  • thanks for response! ) Doesnt work cause not only first letter is replaced with it. – MikroDel Sep 13 '13 at 8:01
  • Sorry mate, I did an edit. That's what you want :) One regex to fit them all :) – Samuel Sep 13 '13 at 8:17

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