20

I have two classes which have are nearly equal except the data types stored in them. One class contains all double values while other contains all float values.

class DoubleClass
{
    double X;
    double Y;
    double Z;
}

class FloatClass
{
    float X;
    float Y;
    float Z;
}

Now I have a point of DoubleClass which I want to convert to FloatClass.

var doubleObject = new DoubleClass();

var convertedObject = (FloatClass)doubleObject; // TODO: This

One simple way is to make a method which creates a new FloatClass object, fills all values and return it. Is there any other efficient way to do this.

4

8 Answers 8

29

Use a conversion operator:

public static explicit operator FloatClass (DoubleClass c) {
   FloatCass fc = new FloatClass();
   fc.X = (float) c.X;
   fc.Y = (float) c.Y;
   fc.Z = (float) c.Z;
   return fc;
}

And then just use it:

var convertedObject = (FloatClass) doubleObject;

Edit

I changed the operator to explicit instead of implicit since I was using a FloatClass cast in the example. I prefer to use explicit over implicit so it forces me to confirm what type the object will be converted to (to me it means less distraction errors + readability).

However, you can use implicit conversion and then you would just need to do:

var convertedObject = doubleObject;

Reference

6
  • 1
    You need to cast the doubles to floats to avoid a compile error. Sep 13, 2013 at 10:52
  • @MatthewWatson yap. Good eye. Thanks Sep 13, 2013 at 10:53
  • Now I want to convert a 2D array of DoubleClass to FloatClass, is it possible using LINQ? or I have to use for loops here?
    – fhnaseer
    Sep 13, 2013 at 11:14
  • 1
    @FaisalHafeez you can try: FloatClass[] converted = Array.ConvertAll(array, s => (FloatClass) s); for simple arrays or see this implementation for 2D arrays: stackoverflow.com/a/6065947/1873446 Sep 13, 2013 at 11:16
  • @letiagoalves: You can even omit the cast operator if you have an implicit cast: FloatClass fc = doubleObject; Sep 13, 2013 at 11:22
6

Sounds like you could use generics here:

 public class GenericClass<T>
 {
    T X { get; set; }
    T Y { get; set; }
    T Z { get; set; }
 }

 GenericClass<float> floatClass = new GenericClass<float>();
 GenericClass<double> doubleClass = new GenericClass<double>();
2
  • It can be a solution, but code is being used in many places, so this solution will require much effort,
    – fhnaseer
    Sep 13, 2013 at 10:49
  • CTRL+F -> "FloatClass" -> V (Expand) -> "GenericClass<float>" -> Replace All. Done :) Sep 10, 2015 at 14:36
5

You can use Conversion Operators to achieve this.

Fr example:

struct FloatClass
{
    public FloatClass(DoubleClass dClass) {
        //conversion...
    }
    ... 
    public static explicit operator FloatClass(DoubleClass dClass) 
    {
        FloatClassd = new FloatClass(dClass);  // explicit conversion

        return d;
    }
}


var convertedObject = (FloatClass)doubleObject;
2
  • Now I want to convert a 2D array of DoubleClass to FloatClass, is it possible using LINQ? or I have to use for loops here?
    – fhnaseer
    Sep 13, 2013 at 11:16
  • 1
    @FaisalHafeez: you can, for example, add an ExtensionMethds for your array class.
    – Tigran
    Sep 13, 2013 at 11:40
2

You could add an implicit type conversion operator:

public class DoubleClass
{
    public double X;
    public double Y;
    public double Z;

    public static implicit operator FloatClass(DoubleClass d)
    {
        return new FloatClass { X = (float)d.X, Y = (float)d.Y, Z = (float)d.Z };
    }
}

Now this works:

DoubleClass doubleObject = new DoubleClass();
FloatClass convertedObject = doubleObject;
1
  • Now I want to convert a 2D array of DoubleClass to FloatClass, is it possible using LINQ? or I have to use for loops here?
    – fhnaseer
    Sep 13, 2013 at 11:13
1

Add a class for thease extention methods :

public static class ExtensionMethods
{
    public static T ToObject<T>(this Object fromObject)
    {
        return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<T>(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(fromObject));
    }


    public static List<T> ToObjectList<T>(this Object fromObject)
    {
        return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<List<T>>(JsonConvert.SerializeObject(fromObject));
    }
}

Use :

using YourExtentionMethodNamespace;

Class2 obj2 = obj1.ToObject<Class2>();
List<Class2> lst2 = _db.Blogs.ToList().ToObjectList<Class2>();
0

The simplest way to do this is by using serializer. Use Newtonsoft JSON serializer which works best.

using Newtonsoft.Json;

  private void Convert()
    {
        DoubleClass doubleClass = new DoubleClass {X = 123.123, Y = 321.321, Z = 111.111};
        var serializedoubleClass = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(doubleClass);
        var floatClass = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(serializedoubleClass, typeof(FloatClass));
    }
1
  • I don't think this is the right way to convert objects
    – dading84
    Jun 8 at 8:13
0

Best way for Convert

public static class Extention {
     public static string ConvertObjectToJson(this object ob)
     {
         return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(ob);
     }
}

For Usage

var doubleClass = new DoubleClass {
   x = 10,
   y = 20
};
var floatClass = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<FloatClass>(doubleClass.ConvertObjectToJson());
-3

Best way is Serialize object and again desalinize it

2
  • 1
    The deserialization will fail because the structures are not equivalent in their storage mechanisms. Even if they were, and it could work, it would still be prohibitively expensive and a fairly poor practice to do this.
    – Servy
    Apr 24, 2014 at 13:59
  • of course, because when you conver it, probably would be very salty, that's why you need to desalinize it after, jk
    – user57129
    Jan 6, 2018 at 22:59

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