14

I'm required to build a menu with 5 options, upon clicking a certain one a new sub menu is to appear. I have absolutely no idea how to do this.

/**Navigation */

nav {
  border: 1px solid red;
  float: left;
  margin-right: 35px;
  min-height: 280px;
}

nav li {
  text-decoration: none;
  font-weight: normal;
  color: red;
  list-style: none;
}


/**Content */

#section {
  background-color: ;
  border: 1px solid;
  font: normal 12px Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif;
  margin-left: 180px;
}

.clearfix:before,
.clearfix:after {
  content: " ";
  display: table;
}

.clearfix:after {
  clear: both;
}
<div class="clearfix"></div>
<nav>
  <ul>
    <li><a href="index.html" accesskey="1"> Home </a> </li>
    <li><a href="Portfolio.html" accesskey="2"> Portfolio </a> </li>

    <ul>
      <li><a href="Commercial.html">Commercial</a> </li>
      <li><a href="Residential.html">Residential</a> </li>
      <li><a href="heritage.html">Heritage</a> </li>
      <li><a href="Rennovations.html">Rennovations</a> </li>
    </ul>

    <li><a href="services.html" accesskey="3"> Services </a> </li>
    <li><a href="aboutus.html" accesskey="4"> About Us </a> </li>
    <li><a href="contactus.html" accesskey="5"> Contact Us </a> </li>
  </ul>
</nav>

  • Css not have click handler, it's not possible by using css. – maximkou Sep 13 '13 at 12:40
  • You're going to need to invest some time in learning client-side scripting, i.e. Javascript/jQuery. – DevlshOne Sep 13 '13 at 12:44
  • you can use input and label to do a pure css click event check – Gildas.Tambo Sep 13 '13 at 14:06
  • Clients.. they are never satisfied. – Dorvalla Dec 16 '14 at 8:35
  • 1
    There is a pure CSS solution using :active with :hover, but the drop-down menu will auto close after hover is lost. – totymedli Aug 29 '16 at 23:41
12

CSS does not have a click handler. For this reason it is impossible to do with standard CSS. You could use something called the checkbox hack, but in my humble opinion, it's a bit clunky and would be awkward to work with inside a navigation menu like your use-case requires. For this reason I would suggest jQuery or Javascript... Here is a rather simple solution using jQuery.

Basically, we hide the sub-nav from the start using display: none; Then, using jQuery, when ".parent" is clicked we toggle a class ".visible" to the sub-nav element (the nested UL) with display: block; which makes it appear. When clicked again, it disappears as the class is removed.

Note that for this to work, every nested <UL> which is a "sub-nav" MUST have the .sub-nav class, and it's parent element (the <LI>) MUST have the .parent class. Also, since this uses jQuery, you will need to hook up a jQuery library to your site. You can do this by hosting it yourself and linking it like you normally would, or you can link it from google's library service (recommended).

JSFiddle Demo

$(document).ready(function() {
  $('.parent').click(function() {
    $('.sub-nav').toggleClass('visible');
  });
});
#nav ul.sub-nav {
  display: none;
}

#nav ul.visible {
  display: block;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<ul id="nav">
  <li>Home</li>
  <li class="parent">About
    <ul class="sub-nav">
      <li>Johnny</li>
      <li>Julie</li>
      <li>Jamie</li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li>Contact</li>
</ul>

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks Michael! Exactly what I was after! and thanks to everyone else for the help. Just curiously why are all the examples set as a 'ul' with a class id? I'm only asking because I was trying to use as many HTML 5 tags as I could. Best Guy. – Brendan Sep 13 '13 at 13:37
  • @BBMAN In my specific example I simply tagged the id="nav" onto the first UL to show it is the upper-most level of the menu. You can certainly still use your <nav> element without any issues, you should still conform to the standard use of UL's and LI's to build out the nav itself though. The other classes are required for the jQuery to work. The .parent class is what jQuery uses to detect when someone has clicked on an LI that has a sub-menu present. Then the class .sub-nav is what is used to by jQuery to figure out what element it should stick the visible class into. – Michael Sep 13 '13 at 13:52
  • @alsweet This assumes OP wants the sub-nav to disappear when mouse is no longer hovering there, something I would suggest against with this sort of application. – Michael Nov 6 '13 at 19:53
  • I would recommend everyone head to the .toggleClass() documentation at jQuery UI. Adding eases to functions are easy and can greatly improve your application. – tehlivi Dec 2 '13 at 20:40
  • For people who came here looking for a "CSS only" solution, there's some posted below. – Stephan Muller Sep 23 '14 at 9:37
13

In addition to the already mentioned checkbox hack, you could also use a button as menu items, and use the :focus state to display the dropdown menu. A benefit over this is that the menu will close if you click outside of it. Some HTML elements do not naturally receive focus upon clicks; for those, you can add the "tabindex" attribute to allow them to gain focus.

ul {
    list-style: none;
}

.menu > li {
    float: left;
}
.menu button {
    border: 0;
    background: transparent;
    cursor: pointer;
}
.menu button:hover,
.menu button:focus {
    outline: 0;
    text-decoration: underline;
}

.submenu {
    display: none;
    position: absolute;
    padding: 10px;
}
.menu button:focus + .submenu,
.submenu:hover {
    display: block;
}
<ul class="menu">
    <li>
        <button>Home</button>
        <ul class="submenu">
            <li><a href="http://www.barbie.com">Link</a></li>
            <li>Link</li>
            <li>Link</li>
            <li>Link</li>
            <li>Link</li>
        </ul>
    </li>
    <li><button>More</button></li>
    <li><button>Info</button></li>
</ul>

| improve this answer | |
3

Of course I am late but:

You can trigger a css click using a hack!!

Work with an checkbox!!

Sample:

      ul{
            display: none;
        }
        #checkbox{
            opacity: 0;
        }
        #checkbox:checked + ul {
            
            display: block;
        }
    <div class="container">
        <label for="checkbox">Dropdown menu</label>
        <input id="checkbox" type="checkbox" />        
        <ul>
            <li><a href="#">Dropdown link 1</a></li>
            <li><a href="#">Dropdown link 2</a></li>
        </ul>
    </div>

You can use transitions to animate the show an hide effect :) This is just a very simple example!!

Mention: this is a CSS3 hack if you need borwser support for old browsers this is not working.

| improve this answer | |
  • :checked is not supported – Steven Web Jan 20 '15 at 16:24
1

In fact, there is a possibility to get this working with pure CSS and browser element behaviour, using the checkbox hack, however at the time of writing this, it is pushing what SHOULD be done with CSS vs what COULD be done with CSS. Also It can cause some pretty terrible semantic code (after all there is a reason it is usually stated as the checkbox HACK).

Having said that, you could use it if you only have requirements for modern browsers, giving limited functionality to others and I have myself used this in production code, on an isolated chrome only project and it is pretty fun to play with.

Here is a link to read more on it:

http://css-tricks.com/the-checkbox-hack/

But again to stress, like others have on here already, that functional behaviour should really be done via JavaScript. Unless you actually want a hover based menu solution then that is a different question all together!

| improve this answer | |
  • Beautiful solution, seems to work pretty well for our use case, thank you. – sleepycal Apr 4 '14 at 15:10
0

You will need to do this using javascript and registering a click event handler to perform your action.

If you're new to everything then you should look for some javascript tutorials (don't use W3Schools, look elsewhere) and then look at some jQuery tutorials as jQuery simplifies tasks like these.

| improve this answer | |
0

There are many frameworks that you can use with good looking menus for your needs, not to mention they support all devices (tablets, phones and PCs).

For example in the twitter bootstrap framework there is exactly what you need, check this tutorial: Twitter bootstrap - Navs

Read the whole Nav section, at the end they talk about Nav with dropdown for more options. The menu of the tutorial itself is built with the Twitter bootstrap framework.

| improve this answer | |
0

a pure css solution to your problem looks like this

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/HyGZf/1/

you need input and label and you have to remove the href on portfolio if you only want to use css

you can add transition: all 1s ease-in-out; to the submenu if you want it to be animate

/**Navigation */
nav{
    border: 1px solid red ;
    float: left;
    margin-right:35px;
    min-height:280px;
    }


nav li{
text-decoration:none;
font-weight:normal;
color:red;
list-style:none;
display:block;
width:100%;
}   
/**Content */
#section{
    background-color: ;
    border: 1px solid;
    font: normal 12px Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; 
    margin-left:180px;
 }



 .clearfix:before,
.clearfix:after {
    content: " ";
    display: table;
}

.clearfix:after {
    clear: both;

}
#Portfolio:checked +ul ul#submenu{
 height:80px;   
}
#submenu{
    overflow:hidden;
    height:0px;
    margin:0;
}
a[accesskey="2"]{
    color:blue;
    cursor:pointer;
    text-decoration:underline;
}

the markup

    <div class="clearfix"></div>
<nav>
    <input id="Portfolio" type="checkbox" name="menu" hidden>
    <ul>
        <li><a href="index.html" accesskey="1"> Home </a> </li>
        <li><label for="Portfolio"><a accesskey="2"> Portfolio </a></label> </li>

        <ul id=submenu type="list">
              <li><a href="Commercial.html">Commercial</a> </li>
              <li><a href="Residential.html">Residential</a> </li>
              <li><a href="heritage.html">Heritage</a> </li>
              <li><a href="Rennovations.html">Rennovations</a> </li>
        </ul>

        <li><a href="services.html" accesskey="3"> Services </a> </li>
        <li><a href="aboutus.html" accesskey="4"> About Us </a> </li>
        <li><a href="contactus.html" accesskey="5"> Contact Us </a> </li>
     </ul>
</nav>
| improve this answer | |
0

 $('#open').on('click', function(e) {
   simple_showpopup("popup", e);
 });

 function simple_showpopup(id, evt) {
   var _pnl = $("#" + id);
   _pnl.show();
   _pnl.css({
     "left": evt.pageX - ($("#" + id).width() / 2),
     "top": (evt.pageY + 10)
   });

   $(document).on("mouseup", function(e) {
     var popup = $("#" + id);
     if (!popup.is(e.target) && popup.has(e.target).length == 0) {
       popup.hide();
       $(this).off(e);
     }
   });
 }

 $("#popup").hide();
.defa-context-panel {
  border: 1px solid black;
  position: absolute;
  min-width: 200px;
  min-height: 150px;
  background-color: #f8f8f8;
  border: solid 1px #f2f2f2;
  border-radius: 10px;
  padding: 5px;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<span>Open&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<span id="open" style="text-decoration:underline;color:blue;cursor:pointer">Click here</span>

<div id="popup" class="defa-context-panel">Content
  <div>DIV inside</div>
</div>

| improve this answer | |

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