I'm trying to control Google Chrome's (horrible) font anti-aliasing using the -webkit-font-smoothing CSS property, but it's having absolutely no effect on the text.

<div style="font-size: 42px">
  <p style="-webkit-font-smoothing: subpixel-antialiased">This is a font test.</p>
  <p style="-webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased">This is a font test.</p>
  <p style="-webkit-font-smoothing: none">This is a font test.</p>
</div>

I've compared the pixels in Photoshop and all three are exactly the same. Is Chrome not supporting this property anymore?

  • Which OS are you using? – Adrift Sep 13 '13 at 12:55
  • I'm on Windows 7. Font rendering seems to be fine in OSX. – Gavin Sep 13 '13 at 13:18
  • 2
    They all look different on OSX, Chrome 31. – Rich Bradshaw Sep 13 '13 at 13:22
  • I guess I'll have to let Chrome users on Windows see horrible pixelated text. I figured by 2013 we'd at least be past inconsistent font rendering issues. – Gavin Sep 13 '13 at 13:29
  • 1
    Actually Chrome has had font rendering issues for long time, regardless of font smoothing. Check out my answer here for details. But a fix is coming soon it looks like, finally! – Trevor Feb 6 '14 at 2:43
up vote 14 down vote accepted

https://productforums.google.com/forum/?fromgroups=#!topic/chrome/0vqp1bnkaoE

-webkit-font-smoothing no longer works. Google Chrome team intentionally changed this behavior. Seems font-smoothing wasn't applied "properly" on OSX in previous versions.

  • 22
    Great. They took away the one thing that could make fonts look halfway decent in Chrome. Why even enter the browser arena if you can't render a font. – Gavin Sep 13 '13 at 13:18
  • Wait, does this mean that -webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased; is gone and subpixel is the standard? Thank God, Jesus, Zeus, or whomever made this possible. Or Google. – jocap Mar 3 '14 at 9:00
  • The problem is that the Mac's subpixel antialiasing results in light fonts on dark backgrounds being way, way too bold. Turning off subpixel antialiasing was the only way to fix it. Now you can't in Chrome. – 75th Trombone Oct 8 '14 at 21:15
  • Using chrome 43 on OS X, it doesn't seem to support subpixel antialiasing at all any more. Firefox renders fonts nicely using subpixel antialiasing, which I prefer over grayscale antialiasing. – Tor Jul 14 '15 at 4:53
  • 2
    This is mostly not correct and that link is not a good example of the full discussion. The Google Chrome team decided to put the font-smoothing property back into chrome in the following release since they didn't come up with a better solution to rectify the original issue and didn't want to create further confusion. If you search for the issues tracker for Chromium, you can find a discussion that describes it in further detail. – Mike Kormendy Sep 6 '16 at 20:18

Well you are right. Font-smoothing is not supported now. It is not in new css standards. So, No more font-smoothing.! YOu may wanna see w3c standards here. http://www.w3.org/TR/WD-font/#font-smooth

If you are using a browser or OS that does not have font rendering than this will not work, have you tried -moz- -o-, Chrome works on -webkit- it has to be your browser.

It seems that for some (system?) fonts, there is a difference between your test cases:

body {
   font-family: "HelveticaNeue-Light";
   font-weight: 300;
}

http://jsfiddle.net/gN875/

Try this CSS:

div {
  -webkit-text-stroke: 0.6px;
}
<div style="font-size: 42px">
  <p style="-webkit-font-smoothing: subpixel-antialiased">This is a font test.</p>
  <p style="-webkit-font-smoothing: antialiased">This is a font test.</p>
  <p style="-webkit-font-smoothing: none">This is a font test.</p>
</div>

  • 1
    All this does is bump up the stroke width. Doesn't solve the problem at all – Daniel Bonnell Apr 3 '17 at 20:09
  • This is more useful than it seems. Some fonts might just need to be a little bit "bolder", and may or may not make them look better. – xdevs23 Mar 4 at 21:07

You can try syntax:

/* Keyword values */
font-smooth: auto;
font-smooth: never;
font-smooth: always;

/* <length> value */
font-smooth: 2em;

Though present in early (2002) drafts of CSS3 Fonts, font-smooth was removed and this specification is not on the standards track. https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/CSS/font-smooth

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