Hello helpful friends,

We're running into a problem here and I can't figure out why it behaves how it behaves. Hopefully you can help me.

Given the following two (simplified) stored procedures in TSQL (SQL Server 2008R2)

create procedure [datetransaction1] 
as
begin
    begin try
        begin transaction
        declare @a datetime
        exec datetransaction2 '2013-02-02 22:21', @a output
        select @a
        exec datetransaction2 '2013-020222:22', @a output
        select @a
        exec datetransaction2 '2013-02-02 22:23', @a output
        select @a

        commit transaction
    end try
    begin catch
        print 'Catch'
    end catch
end

and

create procedure [dbo].[datetransaction2] @text nvarchar(100), @res datetime OUTPUT  
AS
BEGIN 
    BEGIN TRY
        if (LEN(@text) = 16) SET @text = replace(@text, ' ', 'T') + ':00.000'
        else if (LEN(@text) = 19) SET @text = replace(@text, ' ', 'T') + '.000'
        else SET @text = replace(@text, ' ', 'T') 
        PRINT 'trydate:' + @text
        SELECT @res =convert(datetime, @text, 126)
    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH
        PRINT ERROR_SEVERITY()
        PRINT 'errordate:' + @text
    END CATCH
END

If you then execute exec datetransaction1, we see that all 3 calls to datetransaction2 are executed, with the first and last (as expected) running correctly, and the second one entering the CATCH block within datetransaction2.

So far, so good.

But then we land in the catch block of datetransaction1 with the message that the transaction is uncommittable:

Msg 266, Level 16, State 2, Procedure datetransaction1, Line 0
Transaction count after EXECUTE indicates a mismatching number of BEGIN and COMMIT statements. Previous count = 0, current count = 1.
Msg 3998, Level 16, State 1, Line 1
Uncommittable transaction is detected at the end of the batch. The transaction is rolled back.

Which isn't supposed to happen (I think). We caught the errors in the sub procedures, so why would the transaction suddenly become uncommittable?

Can someone explain that to me?

Note that we can probably find a way around this, but I'm intrigued more by the idea behind it. Why does this transaction suddenly become uncommittable here?

up vote 14 down vote accepted

The reason is: Sql Server dooms the transaction WHENEVER an error occurs, whatever the error is, whether it is in a TRY block or not, whether you saved a transaction state or not, whether the error occurs in a procedure or not, whatever you do.

When the error occurs in one of the procedure calls, the transaction is doomed. You can only rollback it completely (any savepoint will not help).

At the end, since the transaction is doomed, you cannot commit it...

Try this:

SET XACT_ABORT OFF -- pityful attempt to avoid the doom
BEGIN TRANSACTION
--
-- some useful TSQL instructions could be here
--
SAVE TRANSACTION SQL_SERVER_IS_GARBAGE -- another pityful attempt to do a partial restore
PRINT 'XACT_STATE='+CONVERT(varchar(10),XACT_STATE())
BEGIN TRY
  DECLARE @n int
  SELECT @n = CONVERT(int,'ABC') -- some very benign data error here (example)
  COMMIT TRANSACTION -- will never reach here
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
  PRINT ERROR_MESSAGE()
  PRINT 'XACT_STATE='+CONVERT(varchar(10),XACT_STATE())
  IF XACT_STATE()=-1 BEGIN
    PRINT 'The transaction is doomed, say thanks to Sql Server!'
    PRINT 'CANNOT restore to the save point!'
    -- You can just cry here and abort all, you lost all the useful work
    ROLLBACK TRANSACTION
  END
  ELSE BEGIN
    -- would restore before the error if the transaction was not doomed
    ROLLBACK TRANSACTION SQL_SERVER_IS_GARBAGE -- will never reach here either!
  END  
END CATCH  
  • 1
    Thanks. Although it's not the answer I hoped for (I hoped there would be a solution..), it shows that there is no good answer to this question. Unfortunately. – bartlaarhoven Feb 22 '14 at 14:27
  • 2
    This is simply not true. Calling SET XACT_ABORT OFF will leave the transaction in a commitable state for some errors. For example, although this particular conversion error is a real unrecoverable error, something like a primary key violation is not. After catching a primary key violation with SET XACT_ABORT OFF, the transaction remains in a committable state. Contrary to your assertion SQL server does not doom the transaction "whatever the error is", it only dooms it for certain kinds of errors. Proof: imgur.com/a/M4KVU – Triynko Apr 11 '17 at 14:08

Since the second call to datetransaction2 function caused severity level 16 error SQL Server automatically rolled back your transaction. That's the reason for the error you are seeing.

Here is a really nice article why the transactions gets into doomed state when severity level 16 error occurs.

To verify that its getting rolled back automatically I added the following line to your datetransaction2 proc : print XACT_STATE()

  create procedure [dbo].[datetransaction2] @text nvarchar(100), @res datetime OUTPUT  
  AS
  BEGIN 
     print 'Start'
      print XACT_STATE() 
      BEGIN TRY
          if (LEN(@text) = 16) SET @text = replace(@text, ' ', 'T') + ':00.000'
          else if (LEN(@text) = 19) SET @text = replace(@text, ' ', 'T') + '.000'
          else SET @text = replace(@text, ' ', 'T') 
          PRINT 'trydate:' + @text
          SELECT @res =convert(datetime, @text, 126)
      END TRY
      BEGIN CATCH
           print XACT_STATE() 
           print 'Catch'
          PRINT ERROR_SEVERITY()
          PRINT 'errordate:' + @text
      END CATCH
      print XACT_STATE() 
      print 'End'
  END

Looks like the 'commit transaction' is never reached because the code jumps to the catch block. To Avoid this you can add a 'rollback transaction' to your catch block like so:

alter procedure [datetransaction1] 
as
begin
    begin try
        begin transaction
        declare @a datetime
        exec datetransaction2 '2013-02-02 22:21', @a output
        select @a
        exec datetransaction2 '2013-020222:22', @a output
        select @a
        exec datetransaction2 '2013-02-02 22:23', @a output
        select @a

        commit transaction
    end try
    begin catch
        print 'Catch'
         rollback transaction
    end catch
end
  • Nope, that's not the problem. The issue is that the catch block shouldn't be reached at all, as all errors are caught within their own procedures, so the main transaction shouldn't contain errors anymore. – bartlaarhoven Sep 13 '13 at 14:11

In short: a catch statement often causes a rollback (see 1). This depends on XACT_ABORT. Next, rollbacks are not contained to the SP where they are initiated (see 2).

The first reference (1) gives a workaround using @@trancount, see the accepted answer there.

  • 1
    Hey, and welcome to SO! FYI, you can put code in teletype-font by enclosing it in backticks. – Doctor Mohawk Sep 13 '13 at 22:16
  • Thanks mohawkjohn. I didn't feel it necessary for the short bits of code, but indeed, it has quite a nice look! – DdW Sep 13 '13 at 22:45
  • Well, if you don't, there's a good chance other people will edit and do it for you. It's generally appreciated. Thank you. =) – Doctor Mohawk Sep 13 '13 at 23:25

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.