76

How do I create an array in unix shell scripting?

14 Answers 14

83

The following code creates and prints an array of strings in shell:

#!/bin/bash
array=("A" "B" "ElementC" "ElementE")
for element in "${array[@]}"
do
    echo "$element"
done

echo
echo "Number of elements: ${#array[@]}"
echo
echo "${array[@]}"

Result:

A
B
ElementC
ElementE

Number of elements: 4

A B ElementC ElementE
59

in bash, you create array like this

arr=(one two three)

to call the elements

$ echo "${arr[0]}"
one
$ echo "${arr[2]}"
three

to ask for user input, you can use read

read -p "Enter your choice: " choice
16

Bourne shell doesn't support arrays. However, there are two ways to handle the issue.

Use positional shell parameters $1, $2, etc.:

$ set one two three
$ echo $*
one two three
$ echo $#
3
$ echo $2
two

Use variable evaluations:

$ n=1 ; eval a$n="one" 
$ n=2 ; eval a$n="two" 
$ n=3 ; eval a$n="three"
$ n=2
$ eval echo \$a$n
two
  • 1
    Bash supports arrays. Not sure about original Bourne shell, but bash is more prevalent these days... – plesiv Aug 5 '13 at 6:16
  • 2
    @zplesivcak - ... on GNU/Linux, since it's a GNU thing. For example, FreeBSD doesn't ship with bash (it's installable from ports though). Scripts written assuming bash features aren't portable, and they're noticably slower slower than most Bourne shell implementations (like dash, which is common on GNU/Linux distributions). bash is a nice interactive shell, but it's slow for scripting. – beatgammit Oct 31 '13 at 18:36
  • 1
    $* is considered harmful. Normally, $@ is preferred since it does the same, but keeps spaces. $@ is expanded as "$1" "$2" "$3" ... "$n", while $* is expanded as "$1x$2x$3x...$n", where x is $IFS separator (most likely, space). – zserge Feb 14 '14 at 18:15
  • 1
    Unquoted, $@ is the same as $*; the difference only shows up when quoted: "$*" is one word, while "$@" preserves the original word breaks. – Mark Reed Dec 9 '15 at 16:11
  • The question is tagged bash, so bash-specific responses are appropriate, but it's certainly true that one shouldn't assume that /bin/sh is bash. – Mark Reed Dec 9 '15 at 16:12
13
#!/bin/bash

# define a array, space to separate every item
foo=(foo1 foo2)

# access
echo "${foo[1]}"

# add or changes
foo[0]=bar
foo[2]=cat
foo[1000]=also_OK

You can read the ABS "Advanced Bash-Scripting Guide"

  • 2
    Please reconsider suggesting the ABS as a learning resource -- it's in many ways to bash what W3Schools is to HTML and Javascript, having lots of Google juice but showcasing bad practices in many of its examples, and rarely and inadequately updated. The bash-hackers' wiki is a much better resource; so is the BashGuide. – Charles Duffy Jun 22 '18 at 16:04
8

The Bourne shell and C shell don't have arrays, IIRC.

In addition to what others have said, in Bash you can get the number of elements in an array as follows:

elements=${#arrayname[@]}

and do slice-style operations:

arrayname=(apple banana cherry)
echo ${arrayname[@]:1}                   # yields "banana cherry"
echo ${arrayname[@]: -1}                 # yields "cherry"
echo ${arrayname[${#arrayname[@]}-1]}    # yields "cherry"
echo ${arrayname[@]:0:2}                 # yields "apple banana"
echo ${arrayname[@]:1:1}                 # yields "banana"
  • csh does have arrays. – Keith Thompson Aug 5 '13 at 6:30
  • @KeithThompson: It's not documented in the man page but the functionality does appear to be present in at least some versions. – Dennis Williamson Aug 5 '13 at 11:03
  • 2
    The man page doesn't mention "arrays" by that name, but see the documentation of the set command (set name=(wordlist)) and the "Variable substituion" section ($name[selector] and ${name[selector]}). As far as I know, csh has always supported arrays. See, for example, the $path array variable, which mirrors the $PATH environment variable. – Keith Thompson Sep 19 '13 at 15:45
7

Try this :

echo "Find the Largest Number and Smallest Number of a given number"
echo "---------------------------------------------------------------------------------"
echo "Enter the number"
read n
i=0

while [ $n -gt 0 ] #For Seperating digits and Stored into array "x"
do
        x[$i]=`expr $n % 10`
        n=`expr $n / 10`
        i=`expr $i + 1`
done

echo "Array values ${x[@]}"  # For displaying array elements


len=${#x[*]}  # it returns the array length


for (( i=0; i<len; i++ ))    # For Sorting array elements using Bubble sort
do
    for (( j=i+1; j<len;  j++ ))
    do
        if [ `echo "${x[$i]} > ${x[$j]}"|bc` ]
        then
                t=${x[$i]}
                t=${x[$i]}
                x[$i]=${x[$j]}
                x[$j]=$t
        fi
        done
done


echo "Array values ${x[*]}"  # Displaying of Sorted Array


for (( i=len-1; i>=0; i-- ))  # Form largest number
do
   a=`echo $a \* 10 + ${x[$i]}|bc`
done

echo "Largest Number is : $a"

l=$a  #Largest number

s=0
while [ $a -gt 0 ]  # Reversing of number, We get Smallest number
do
        r=`expr $a % 10`
        s=`echo "$s * 10 + $r"|bc`
        a=`expr $a / 10`
done
echo "Smallest Number is : $s" #Smallest Number

echo "Difference between Largest number and Smallest number"
echo "=========================================="
Diff=`expr $l - $s`
echo "Result is : $Diff"


echo "If you try it, We can get it"
6

Your question asks about "unix shell scripting", but is tagged bash. Those are two different answers.

The POSIX specification for shells does not have anything to say about arrays, as the original Bourne shell did not support them. Even today, on FreeBSD, Ubuntu Linux, and many other systems, /bin/sh does not have array support. So if you want your script to work in different Bourne-compatible shells, you shouldn't use them. Alternatively, if you are assuming a specific shell, then be sure to put its full name in the shebang line, e.g. #!/usr/bin/env bash.

If you are using bash or zsh, or a modern version of ksh, you can create an array like this:

myArray=(first "second element" 3rd)

and access elements like this

$ echo "${myArray[1]}"
second element

You can get all the elements via "${myArray[@]}". You can use the slice notation ${array[@]:start:length} to restrict the portion of the array referenced, e.g. "${myArray[@]:1}" to leave off the first element.

The length of the array is ${#myArray[@]}. You can get a new array containing all the indexes from an existing array with "${!myArray[@]}".

Older versions of ksh before ksh93 also had arrays, but not the parenthesis-based notation, nor did they support slicing. You could create an array like this, though:

set -A myArray -- first "second element" 3rd 
5

You can try of the following type :

#!/bin/bash
 declare -a arr

 i=0
 j=0

  for dir in $(find /home/rmajeti/programs -type d)
   do
        arr[i]=$dir
        i=$((i+1))
   done


  while [ $j -lt $i ]
  do
        echo ${arr[$j]}
        j=$((j+1))
  done
  • breaks on directory names with spaces. use a while read loop of change IFS to take care of that. – ghostdog74 Dec 10 '09 at 6:22
5

An array can be loaded in twoways.

set -A TEST_ARRAY alpha beta gamma

or

X=0 # Initialize counter to zero.

-- Load the array with the strings alpha, beta, and gamma

for ELEMENT in alpha gamma beta
do
    TEST_ARRAY[$X]=$ELEMENT
    ((X = X + 1))
done

Also, I think below information may help:

The shell supports one-dimensional arrays. The maximum number of array elements is 1,024. When an array is defined, it is automatically dimensioned to 1,024 elements. A one-dimensional array contains a sequence of array elements, which are like the boxcars connected together on a train track.

In case you want to access the array:

echo ${MY_ARRAY[2] # Show the third array element
 gamma 


echo ${MY_ARRAY[*] # Show all array elements
-   alpha beta gamma


echo ${MY_ARRAY[@] # Show all array elements
 -  alpha beta gamma


echo ${#MY_ARRAY[*]} # Show the total number of array elements
-   3


echo ${#MY_ARRAY[@]} # Show the total number of array elements
-   3

echo ${MY_ARRAY} # Show array element 0 (the first element)
-  alpha
4

If you want a key value store with support for spaces use the -A parameter:

declare -A programCollection
programCollection["xwininfo"]="to aquire information about the target window."

for program in ${!programCollection[@]}
do
    echo "The program ${program} is used ${programCollection[${program}]}"
done

http://linux.die.net/man/1/bash "Associative arrays are created using declare -A name. "

3

To read the values from keybord and insert element into array

# enter 0 when exit the insert element
echo "Enter the numbers"
read n
while [ $n -ne 0 ]
do
    x[$i]=`expr $n`
    read n
    let i++
done

#display the all array elements
echo "Array values ${x[@]}"
echo "Array values ${x[*]}"

# To find the array length
length=${#x[*]}
echo $length
3

There are multiple ways to create an array in shell.

ARR[0]="ABC"
ARR[1]="BCD"
echo ${ARR[*]}

${ARR[*]} prints all elements in the array.

Second way is:

ARR=("A" "B" "C" "D" 5 7 "J")
echo ${#ARR[@]}
echo ${ARR[0]}

${#ARR[@]} is used to count length of the array.

  • Nice answer, Great start for a newbie. And welcome to upvote levels ;-) – GhostCat Dec 4 '18 at 10:31
1

In ksh you do it:

set -A array element1 element2 elementn

# view the first element
echo ${array[0]}

# Amount elements (You have to substitute 1)
echo ${#array[*]}

# show last element
echo ${array[ $(( ${#array[*]} - 1 )) ]}
  • A more concise way to show the last element is echo "${array[@]:(-1)}". This eliminates the need to write the array variable name twice. – Alex Dupuy Feb 26 '14 at 22:20
1

A Simple way :

arr=("sharlock"  "bomkesh"  "feluda" )  ##declare array

len=${#arr[*]}  #determine length of array

# iterate with for loop
for (( i=0; i<len; i++ ))
do
    echo ${arr[$i]}
done

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