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How to use Visual Studio "Find in Files" tool window to find ALL lines having a certain phrase in them but filter by NON-comment lines at the same time?

There must be a regular expression? Or a link to the regexp help?

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    You know, this is actually pretty useful Sep 13, 2013 at 14:55
  • @AdrianCarneiro is it? In a good codebase I can't think of a really good reason for this. I'm sure there are edge cases though. Sep 13, 2013 at 14:57
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    As a side note, if too many comments are getting in the way of the code then perhaps it's time to get rid of some of the comments.
    – David
    Sep 13, 2013 at 14:57
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    @YuriyFaktorovich Well, just remember that there's code you inherit. Sep 13, 2013 at 14:58
  • @AdrianCarneiro that's the edge case. Sep 13, 2013 at 14:59

1 Answer 1

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Select "Use Regular Expressions" in the "Find in Files" window and enter the following phrase in the search box:

^(?!(\s*/+)).*phrase

If you want the phrase to stay as a single word:

^(?!(\s*/+)).*\s+phrase\s+

Regarding the help: in regexp mode there is a small button next to the search box: [(a)+] It opens a short list with common regexp commands. At the end of that list there is a link to the msdn documentation.

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  • Great. I was struggling with the negating '?!' syntax. As far as I remember it was '^' earlier?
    – user492238
    Sep 13, 2013 at 15:02
  • Ah! Found it on the msdn side to mentioned. It was an 'old' syntax. You have the 'new' one. Obvious!
    – user492238
    Sep 13, 2013 at 15:07
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    This wouldn't handle multiline comments.
    – Servy
    Sep 13, 2013 at 15:10
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    You are right. I doubt it is possible to handle multiline comments reliably with regular expressions. The same issue as parsing XML with regexp. Sep 13, 2013 at 15:19
  • It would be great if it were possible. Maybe we could exclude strings as well?
    – user492238
    Sep 13, 2013 at 15:30

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