20

I have a vector:

a <- c(1,2,3,4,5)

And I'd like to do something like:

b <- roll(a, 2) # 4,5,1,2,3

Is there a function like that in R? I've been googling around, but "R Roll" mostly gives me pages about Spanish pronunciation.

24

How about using head and tail...

roll <- function( x , n ){
  if( n == 0 )
    return( x )
  c( tail(x,n) , head(x,-n) )
}

roll(1:5,2)
#[1] 4 5 1 2 3

#  For the situation where you supply 0 [ this would be kinda silly! :) ]
roll(1:5,0)
#[1] 1 2 3 4 5

One cool thing about using head and tail... you get a reverse roll with negative n, e.g.

roll(1:5,-2)
[1] 3 4 5 1 2
0
23

Here's an alternative which has the advantage of working even when x is "rolled" by more than one full cycle (i.e. when abs(n) > length(x)):

roll <- function(x, n) {
    x[(seq_along(x) - (n+1)) %% length(x) + 1]
}

roll(1:5, 2)
# [1] 4 5 1 2 3
roll(1:5, 0)
# [1] 1 2 3 4 5
roll(1:5, 11)
# [1] 5 1 2 3 4

FWIW (and not that it's worth much) it also works on data.frames:

head(mtcars, 1)
#           mpg cyl disp  hp drat   wt  qsec vs am gear carb
# Mazda RX4  21   6  160 110  3.9 2.62 16.46  0  1    4    4
head(roll(mtcars, 2), 1)
#           gear carb mpg cyl disp  hp drat   wt  qsec vs am
# Mazda RX4    4    4  21   6  160 110  3.9 2.62 16.46  0  1
1
  • Is there a good mathematical proof that this works? I've proved enough to convince myself, but I've got nothing ironclad.
    – J. Mini
    Jun 27 '20 at 16:57
4

The package binhf has the function shift:

library(binhf)

shift(1:5, places = 2)
#[1] 4 5 1 2 3

places can be positive or negative

2

You can also use the permute package:

require(permute)

a <- c(1,2,3,4,5)

shuffleSeries(a, start = 2)

output:

[1] 3 4 5 1 2
1

rearrr also contains roll_elements_vec() for vectors and roll_elements() for one or more columns in a data frame.

roll_elements() can handle grouped data frames and can find the n setting based on the group members with a given function (e.g. rearrr::median_index() or rearrr::quantile_index()).

Roll a vector -2 positions left (i.e. 2 positions right):

library(rearrr)
library(dplyr)

# Roll vector
roll_elements_vec(1:10, n = -2)

> 9 10  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8

Roll a column in a data frame -2 positions up:

# Set seed
set.seed(1)

# Create a data frame
df <- data.frame(
    "x" = 1:10,
    "y" = runif(10) * 10,
    "g" = rep(1:2, each = 5)
)

# Roll `x` column
roll_elements(df, cols = "x", n = -2)

> # A tibble: 10 x 4
>        y     g     x .n       
>    <dbl> <int> <int> <list>   
>  1 2.66      1     9 <dbl [1]>
>  2 3.72      1    10 <dbl [1]>
>  3 5.73      1     1 <dbl [1]>
>  4 9.08      1     2 <dbl [1]>
>  5 2.02      1     3 <dbl [1]>
>  6 8.98      2     4 <dbl [1]>
>  7 9.45      2     5 <dbl [1]>
>  8 6.61      2     6 <dbl [1]>
>  9 6.29      2     7 <dbl [1]>
> 10 0.618     2     8 <dbl [1]>

The .n column contains the n setting applied. This is mostly useful when finding n with a function.

Roll the x column within each group in g:

# Group by `g` and roll `x` within both groups 
df %>% 
  dplyr::group_by(g) %>% 
  roll_elements(cols = "x", n = -2)

> # A tibble: 10 x 4
>        y     g     x .n       
>    <dbl> <int> <int> <list>   
>  1 2.66      1     4 <dbl [1]>
>  2 3.72      1     5 <dbl [1]>
>  3 5.73      1     1 <dbl [1]>
>  4 9.08      1     2 <dbl [1]>
>  5 2.02      1     3 <dbl [1]>
>  6 8.98      2     9 <dbl [1]>
>  7 9.45      2    10 <dbl [1]>
>  8 6.61      2     6 <dbl [1]>
>  9 6.29      2     7 <dbl [1]>
> 10 0.618     2     8 <dbl [1]>

If we don't specify one or more columns, the entire data frame is rolled. As mentioned we can find n with a function, so here we will roll by the median index (index is 1:10, so median = 5.5 and rounded to 6 positions up).

# Roll entire data frame 
# Find `n` with the `median_index()` function
roll_elements(df, n_fn = median_index)

> # A tibble: 10 x 4
>        x     y     g .n       
>    <int> <dbl> <int> <list>   
>  1     7 9.45      2 <dbl [1]>
>  2     8 6.61      2 <dbl [1]>
>  3     9 6.29      2 <dbl [1]>
>  4    10 0.618     2 <dbl [1]>
>  5     1 2.66      1 <dbl [1]>
>  6     2 3.72      1 <dbl [1]>
>  7     3 5.73      1 <dbl [1]>
>  8     4 9.08      1 <dbl [1]>
>  9     5 2.02      1 <dbl [1]>
> 10     6 8.98      2 <dbl [1]>

Disclaimer: I am the author of rearrr. It also contains a roll_values() function for rolling the value of elements instead of their positions.

0

The numpy roll method supports both directions, forward and backward, and it accepts shift parameters greater than the length of the vector. For example:

Python

import numpy
x=numpy.arange(1,6)
numpy.roll(x,-11)

And we get:

array([2, 3, 4, 5, 1])

Or

x=numpy.arange(1,6)
numpy.roll(x,12)

And we get:

array([4, 5, 1, 2, 3])

We can build an R function that takes into consideration the case where the shift parameter is greater than the length of the vector. For example:

R

custom_roll <- function( x , n ){
  if( n == 0 | n%%length(x)==0) {
    return(x)
    }
  
  else if (abs(n)>length(x)) {
  new_n<- (abs(n)%%length(x))*sign(n)
  return(c( tail(x,new_n) , head(x,-new_n) ))
  }
  else {
  return(c( tail(x,n) , head(x,-n) ))
  }
}

Let's see what we get but taking into consideration again the vector (1,2,3,4,5).

x<-c(1,2,3,4,5)
custom_roll(x,-11)

And we get:

[1] 2 3 4 5 1

Or

x<-c(1,2,3,4,5)
custom_roll(x,12)

And we get:

[1] 4 5 1 2 3

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