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Could someone explain these two functions or the principle behind it that we use in connecting a database into VB? That code came from our teacher and our teacher didn't explain much about why it should be coded like that. We're using MS Access 2003 file for the DB.

Imports System.Data.OleDb

Public Class Form1
    Dim dbPath As String = Application.StartupPath & "\Database\xxxx.mdb"
    Dim connectionString As String = "Provider=Microsoft.Jet.OLEDB.4.0; DATA SOURCE = " & dbPath

    Private Function performQuery(ByRef connectionString As String, ByVal sqlCommand As String) As OleDb.OleDbDataReader
        Dim dbConnection As OleDbConnection
        Dim dbCommand As New OleDbCommand()
        Dim dbDataReader As OleDb.OleDbDataReader = Nothing
        Try
            dbConnection = New OleDbConnection(connectionString)
            dbCommand.CommandText = sqlCommand
            dbCommand.Connection = dbConnection
            dbConnection.Open()
            dbDataReader = dbCommand.ExecuteReader
            Return dbDataReader
            dbConnection.Close()
        Catch ex As Exception
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, Me.Text, MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Warning)
        End Try
        Return Nothing
    End Function

    Private Function performNonQuery(ByVal connectionString As String, ByVal sqlCommand As String) As Boolean
        Dim dbConnection As OleDbConnection
        Dim dbCommand As New OleDbCommand()
        Try
            dbConnection = New OleDbConnection(connectionString)
            dbCommand.CommandText = sqlCommand
            dbCommand.Connection = dbConnection
            dbCommand.Connection.Open()
            dbCommand.ExecuteNonQuery()
            dbConnection.Close()
        Catch ex As Exception
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, Me.Text, MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Warning)
            Return False
        End Try
        Return True
    End Function
End Class
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  • The first one contains many errors. Return before closing connection, catch without closing connection, return a datareader? Well, here it works because the connection is open but it is a very bad piece of code.
    – Steve
    Sep 13, 2013 at 17:10
  • I agree with Steve. The Command, Connection Etc should be used also with Using. Sep 13, 2013 at 22:26

2 Answers 2

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performQuery function is faulty. It never closes the connection (Return dbDataReader happens before connection is being closed). On one hand - it's a good thing, because DataReader is useless without open connection. On the other - connection is opened as a private variable inside of a function so it goes out of scope when the function is returning and you never know when Garbage Collector will decide to collect it. It's always fun when this happens in the middle of Reader.Read.

3
  • @Steve, and Yuriy I see. Could you explain the use of dbConnection = New OleDbConnection(connectionString), dbCommand.Connection = dbConnection, dbConnection.Open(), dbDataReader = dbCommand.ExecuteReader, dbCommand.Connection.Open(), dbCommand.ExecuteNonQuery() ? I have no problem in the codes in database since I have a background in DBMS but in connecting VB and DB, I'm totally new.
    – alois
    Sep 13, 2013 at 17:46
  • Take a look at this basic walkthru: w3schools.com/aspnet/aspnet_dbconnection.asp , that should give you some idea. For more in-depth documentation look at msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/System.Data.OleDb.aspx - click any item in question to get information plus example code Sep 13, 2013 at 17:52
  • Thanks for the links. The questions in my head are almost answered. The only part that I didn't understand in the link is the Repeater Control since I'm not familiar with ADO.Net. :)
    – alois
    Sep 14, 2013 at 12:19
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It is a good idea to separate out the connecting from the executing so the concepts are not so confusing.

The first concept here are to establish a connection to the database using a connection string. but since an OleDbConnection ties up system resources, the variable which handles it needs to be properly disposed of whether or not an exception occurs. This is why the Intellisense on the connection variable tells you that .Dispose() is one of the methods.

Using cnn As OleDbConnection = New OleDbConnection(connectionString)
cnn.Open()
.
.
.
cnn.Close
End Using

The second concept here is when you have an open connection to the database, you can use it to open an OleDbCommand object up, which allows you to either (a) Read something from the database via your"performQuery" method with SELECT, or (b) Do something to the database table via your "performNonQuery" method, using SQL keywords such as UPDATE, DELETE or INSERT.

Using cmd As New OleDbCommand(sqlCommand, cnn)
' Use cnn.ExecuteReader() to get a data reader back,  
' or use cnn.ExecuteNonQuery() to get the number of rows affected back.
.
.
.
End Using

Thirdly, if you are returning information back, usually it comes back in a rectangle of data which can be stepped through via the use of the OleDbDataReader object, one row at a time. But the data reader is useless as a return parameter because it would leave a connection open, and also leave a database cursor pointed at the current row. THAT's no good!

It is far better to return just the data in a table-shaped piece of memory, such as the DataTable object:

dim dt as DataTable = new DataTable("TableName")
Using cnn As OleDbConnection = New OleDbConnection(connectionString) 
cnn.Open() ' open the connection
Using cmd As New OleDbCommand(sqlCommand, cnn) ' make a command object
dr = cmd.ExecuteReader() ' execute the reader
dt.Load(dr) ' BAM - get all the data into the DataTable at once
End Using ' close everything up
Return dt

I think that might explain things a bit.

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  • Okay got it. Somehow, I understand some lines of codes now and the concept. Where's dr came from? Thanks, btw.
    – alois
    Sep 14, 2013 at 9:07

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