6

Assuming I wanted to attribute the text-shadow: green; attribute to every <h2> element occouring inside an element with the classes .dark and ux-bannerwhat CSS code would achieve this?

 <div class="dark ux-banner">
      <div class="the attributed classes of this element will vary">
           <h2>TARGET THIS ELEMENT
           </h2>
      </div>
 </div>

As in the above example <h2> element will be wrapped in a <div> with varying classes attributed to it.

What would be the best way to apply the text-shadow: green; property to the <h2> element when occouring within elements that have the .dark and ux-banner classes attributed without making reference to the <div> immediately surrounding the <h2> element

12

I believe you're looking for:

.dark.ux-banner h2 {
    text-shadow: green;
}

That means: "Set text-shadow: green on all h2 elements that are descendants of an element with both the classes dark and ux-banner.

Alternately, if you want to be somewhat specific:

.dark.ux-banner div h2 {
    text-shadow: green;
}

(Only applies to h2 elements within div elements within .dark.ux-banner elements.)

Or hyper-specific:

.dark.ux-banner > div > h2 {
    text-shadow: green;
}

(Only applies to h2 elements that are direct children of div elements that are direct children of .dark.ux-banner elements.)

The key bit above is really that .dark.ux-banner (with no spaces) means "an element with both of these classes." The rest is just descendant or child combinators.

  • would it not be .dark.ux-banner div h2 if I wanted to target the h2 element? – Adam Scot Sep 13 '13 at 17:18
  • @T.J.Crowder may I know why have you written .dark.ux-banner I mean to ask why two periods in class name? – Gourav Sep 13 '13 at 17:32
  • @T.J.Crowder I got it i read your post. – Gourav Sep 13 '13 at 17:36
  • 1
    This is an excellent explanation of css selectors. I could have used this when I was trying to learn how all of this works.... – MirroredFate Sep 13 '13 at 18:40
  • 1
    @Geek: The space would change the compound class selector into a descendant combinator. (I didn't make that word up, that's what the spec calls them -- ugh!) The meaning would become: ""Set text-shadow: green on all h2 elements that are descendants of an element with the ux-banner class which is, in turn, a descendant of an element with the dark class. E.g., an h2 in a .ux-banner in a .dark, rather than an h2 in a .ux-banner.dark. – T.J. Crowder Sep 19 '13 at 9:57
3

You will need

.dark.ux-banner h2{
     text-shadow:green;
}

What this does is selects the elements that have the class .dark then checks if it has the class .ux-banner then selects all h2 inside that

3
.dark.ux-banner h2 { text-shadow:green; }

http://jsfiddle.net/YjGhw/

0

Here is the demo http://jsfiddle.net/tFScD/2/

      <div class="demo">
        <div class="the attributed classes of this element will vary">
         <h2>TARGET THIS ELEMENT
           </h2>
          </div>
      </div>


  .demo div h2{
         text-shadow:2px 2px green;
     }
0

It's simple. Just use the following:

.dark.ux-banner h2 { 
    text-shadow:green; 
}

This means every h2 element inside an element with these classes will have the text-shadow:green propperty no matter if the h2 element is inside a div or not.

<div class="dark ux-banner">
    <div class="the attributed classes of this element will vary">
        <h2>
            TARGET THIS ELEMENT
        </h2>
    </div>
</div>

or

<div class="dark ux-banner">
    <h2>
        TARGET THIS ELEMENT
    </h2>
</div>

will work the same ;)
0
.dark.ux-banner h2{
     text-shadow:0 0 4px green;
}

the markup

<div class="dark ux-banner">
      <div class="the attributed classes of this element will vary">
           <h2>TARGET THIS ELEMENT
           </h2>
      </div>
 </div>

demo: http://jsfiddle.net/cQcbp/

enter image description here

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