20

I have the following method:

private void DoSomething(CoolClass coolClass)
{
    if (coolClass == null)
    {
        throw new ArgumentNullException("coolClass");
    }
    coolClass.Name = "Pepe";
}

With Code Contracts we can write it like this:

private void DoSomething(CoolClass coolClass)
{
    Contract.Requires<ArgumentNullException>(coolClass != null, "IS NULLL!");
    coolClass.Name = "Pepe";
}

The second method is shorter and simpler. The problem that I have is that when you build it, in runtime it does not throw the exception, it shows this:

Description: An assembly (probably "CodeContractsTest") must be rewritten using the code contracts binary rewriter (CCRewrite) because it is calling Contract.Requires and the CONTRACTS_FULL symbol is defined. Remove any explicit definitions of the CONTRACTS_FULL symbol from your project and rebuild. CCRewrite can be downloaded from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=169180. After the rewriter is installed, it can be enabled in Visual Studio from the project's Properties page on the Code Contracts pane. Ensure that "Perform Runtime Contract Checking" is enabled, which will define CONTRACTS_FULL.

Unless with VS you download the CodeContracts for .net from here.

And then you check the "Runtime check" in the project, so that when you build it in runtime, the exception is thrown.

Our app is build with Jenkins with PowerShell scripts. Is there any way to check in runtime and throw the exception, with a simple command or attribute, or something easy?

2 Answers 2

6

By changing following project properties I could eliminate getting this exception while running.

Right click on project -> Properties -> Code Contract (Tab) change the assembley mode to "Standard Contract Requires" also select checkbox - Perform Runtime contract checking

1
  • 15
    I cannot seem to find this on VS2017, any ideas why? Jan 18, 2018 at 15:15
3

Why don't you just write your own version of the method, if you like the simplicity?

public class CustomContract
{
    public static void Requires<TException>( bool Predicate, string Message )
        where TException : Exception, new()
    {
       if ( !Predicate )
       {
          Debug.WriteLine( Message );
          throw new TException();
       }
    }
}  

Using Code Contracts just to have a friendly API sounds like shooting sparrows with a cannon.

4
  • 1
    yes... is true. But I like code contracts for many reasons. My problem is that when I build it I'm not getting the excption as I want.
    – elranu
    Sep 13, 2013 at 19:39
  • I had change the title of the question.
    – elranu
    Sep 13, 2013 at 19:41
  • 1
    Could you decide whether you want your exception in runtime or in compile time? The latter is not possible in this particular case. Sep 13, 2013 at 19:55
  • 1

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.