675

I need to write a unit test for a method that takes a stream which comes from a text file. I would like to do do something like this:

Stream s = GenerateStreamFromString("a,b \n c,d");

12 Answers 12

863
public static Stream GenerateStreamFromString(string s)
{
    var stream = new MemoryStream();
    var writer = new StreamWriter(stream);
    writer.Write(s);
    writer.Flush();
    stream.Position = 0;
    return stream;
}

Don't forget to use Using:

using (var stream = GenerateStreamFromString("a,b \n c,d"))
{
    // ... Do stuff to stream
}

About the StreamWriter not being disposed. StreamWriter is just a wrapper around the base stream, and doesn't use any resources that need to be disposed. The Dispose method will close the underlying Stream that StreamWriter is writing to. In this case that is the MemoryStream we want to return.

In .NET 4.5 there is now an overload for StreamWriter that keeps the underlying stream open after the writer is disposed of, but this code does the same thing and works with other versions of .NET too.

See Is there any way to close a StreamWriter without closing its BaseStream?

  • 119
    An important point concept to point out is that a stream is composed of bytes, while a string is composed of characters. It is crucial to understand that converting a character to one or more bytes (or to a Stream as in this case) always uses (or assumes) a particular encoding. This answer, while correct in some cases, uses the Default encoding, and may not be suitable in general. Explicitly passing an Encoding to the StreamWriter constructor would make it more apparent that the author needs to consider the implications of Encoding. – drwatsoncode Mar 28 '14 at 20:42
  • 4
    You say "Don't forget to use the Using" for using the stream, but in your GenerateStreamFromString method you are not using the Using with the StreamWriter. Is there a reason for this? – Ben Mar 20 '15 at 18:23
  • 9
    @Ben Yes. If you dispose of the StreamWriter the underlying stream will also be closed. We don't want that. The only reason the Writer is disposable is to clean up the stream, so it is safe to ignore. – Cameron MacFarland Mar 21 '15 at 3:46
  • 2
    It should also be noted, that the entire string is copied to a memory which may be important for large strings because now we have one extra copy in the memory. – UGEEN Feb 5 '16 at 9:49
  • I would also suggest using the AutoFlush property of StreamWriter if you need to flush multiple times after multiple calls to Write – Sid Nov 7 '16 at 8:35
643

Another solution:

public static MemoryStream GenerateStreamFromString(string value)
{
    return new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(value ?? ""));
}
  • 30
    Just in case someone uses this with an XML string deserialization, I had to switch UTF8 to Unicode for it to work without a flag. Great post!!! – Gaspa79 Feb 14 '14 at 15:28
  • 1
    I like this one (with Rhyous's tweak and the trivial extra sugar for use as an extension method) better than the accepted answer; more flexible, fewer LOC and fewer objects involved (no explicit need for a StreamWriter) – KeithS May 11 '15 at 18:58
  • new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes("\ufeff" + (value ?? "")) if you need to have the BOM included at the beginning of the stream – robert4 Dec 17 '15 at 10:42
  • 4
    This is very compact syntax but it's going to cause a lot of allocations of byte[] so beware in high performance code. – michael.aird Mar 19 '17 at 19:08
  • This solution still left the opportunity to make the stream readonly. new MemoryStream( value, false ). You cannot make a stream readonly if you have to write it with a stream writer. – codekandis Nov 19 '18 at 9:20
105

Add this to a static string utility class:

public static Stream ToStream(this string str)
{
    MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream();
    StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(stream);
    writer.Write(str);
    writer.Flush();
    stream.Position = 0;
    return stream;
}

This adds an extension function so you can simply:

using (var stringStream = "My string".ToStream())
{
    // use stringStream
}
  • 5
    I discovered that the returned stream gets closed (causing semi-random exceptions) when the garbage collector cleans up the StreamWriter. The fix was to use a different constructor - one that allowed me to specify leaveOpen. – Bevan Nov 1 '15 at 7:34
37
public Stream GenerateStreamFromString(string s)
{
    return new MemoryStream(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(s));
}
22

Use the MemoryStream class, calling Encoding.GetBytes to turn your string into an array of bytes first.

Do you subsequently need a TextReader on the stream? If so, you could supply a StringReader directly, and bypass the MemoryStream and Encoding steps.

13

I used a mix of answers like this:

public static Stream ToStream(this string str, Encoding enc = null)
{
    enc = enc ?? Encoding.UTF8;
    return new MemoryStream(enc.GetBytes(str ?? ""));
}

And then I use it like this:

String someStr="This is a Test";
Encoding enc = getEncodingFromSomeWhere();
using (Stream stream = someStr.ToStream(enc))
{
    // Do something with the stream....
}
  • Thomas,why down vote ? enc= enc ?? Encoding.UTF8 allows me to specifically ask stream with specific encoding , or a default of UTF8 , and because in .net(as far i use it .net 4.0 ) you can't give a reference type other than string a default value in function signature this line is necessary, does that make sense ? – Robocide Feb 3 '16 at 9:48
  • mentioning that you need to put this in a separate class (non generic static class?) is also helpful and reduce the down votes. – Ali May 26 '16 at 12:05
9

Here you go:

private Stream GenerateStreamFromString(String p)
{
    Byte[] bytes = UTF8Encoding.GetBytes(p);
    MemoryStream strm = new MemoryStream();
    strm.Write(bytes, 0, bytes.Length);
    return strm;
}
  • 1
    The position needs to be reset after writing. Better to use the constructor, as in joelnet's answer. – Jim Balter Sep 11 '15 at 20:33
9

We use the extension methods listed below. I think you should make the developer make a decision about the encoding, so there is less magic involved.

public static class StringExtensions {

    public static Stream ToStream(this string s) {
        return s.ToStream(Encoding.UTF8);
    }

    public static Stream ToStream(this string s, Encoding encoding) {
        return new MemoryStream(encoding.GetBytes(s ?? ""));
    }
}
  • I would prefer to implement the first method as return ToStream(s, Encoding.UTF8);. In the current implementation (return s.ToStream(Encoding.UTF8);, the developer is forced to think harder to grasp the code and it seems that the case of s == null is unhandled and throws NullReferenceException. – Palec Oct 23 '17 at 13:32
8

I think you can benefit from using a MemoryStream. You can fill it with the string bytes that you obtain by using the GetBytes method of the Encoding class.

8

Modernized and slightly modified version of the extension methods for ToStream:

public static Stream ToStream(this string value) => ToStream(value, Encoding.UTF8);

public static Stream ToStream(this string value, Encoding encoding) 
                          => new MemoryStream(encoding.GetBytes(value ?? string.Empty));

Modification as suggested in @Palec's comment of @Shaun Bowe answer.

-1
/// <summary>
/// Get Byte[] from String
/// </summary>
/// <param name="str"></param>
/// <returns></returns>
public static byte[] GetBytes(string str)
{
  byte[] bytes = new byte[str.Length * sizeof(char)];
  System.Buffer.BlockCopy(str.ToCharArray(), 0, bytes, 0, bytes.Length);
  return bytes;
}

/// <summary>
/// Get Stream from String
/// </summary>
/// <param name="str"></param>
/// <returns></returns>
public static Stream GetStream(string str)
{
  return new MemoryStream(GetBytes(str));
}
  • 2
    System.String is aways UTF-16. Isn't it? – abatishchev Jan 30 '14 at 8:20
  • 3
    You say "It does not need to know String encoding to work." That's like saying it doesn't matter what color your car is because you're going to dump green paint all over it. As abatishchev points out, you are unknowningly using the UTF-16 encoding to convert the string to bytes. Let's say you now write the contents of this Stream to a file, and open it as a text file. You will see spaces between each character. – drwatsoncode Mar 28 '14 at 20:35
-1

A good combination of String extensions:

public static byte[] GetBytes(this string str)
{
    byte[] bytes = new byte[str.Length * sizeof(char)];
    System.Buffer.BlockCopy(str.ToCharArray(), 0, bytes, 0, bytes.Length);
    return bytes;
}

public static Stream ToStream(this string str)
{
    Stream StringStream = new MemoryStream();
    StringStream.Read(str.GetBytes(), 0, str.Length);
    return StringStream;
}

protected by Patrick Hofman Dec 29 '14 at 11:40

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