12

For example, we know that "int" type in C# is nothing but a structure which is actually System.Int32. If that so, then if "using system;" is commented in a program, then int type should not be able to use. But still int type can be used. My question is, from where these types are coming from?

//using System;
class Program
{
    static void Main() {
         int x = 0;  // it still work, though int is under System namespace, why??
    }
}
5
  • 1
    The int type is certainly not a structure. It is what got you on the wrong footing, the C# compiler has hard-coded knowledge of what Int32 looks like. So much so that int is a keyword in the language. And it doesn't have to be Int32 forever, a hundred years from now it may well be another type. – Hans Passant Sep 15 '13 at 18:06
  • @HansPassant I got this info from msdn link : msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/… – sahossaini Sep 15 '13 at 18:12
  • Sure, that's what it looks like, the .NET Framework was written in C#. Declaring the Int32 type in C# is a hopeless chicken-and-egg problem, the structure trick was a workaround for that. – Hans Passant Sep 15 '13 at 18:19
  • @HansPassant The core semantics of Int32 are baked into IL. x + y if x and y are ints is very different than if they were plain old C# types with a custom operator. C# in a sense just builds on top of the lower-level language. At least, I find it much more useful to think about it that way. – p.s.w.g Sep 15 '13 at 18:27
  • Not really, there's only one Opcodes.Add and it is used for several types. But yes, like the C# compiler there's lots of hard-coded knowledge of Int32 in the jitter and the CLR. – Hans Passant Sep 15 '13 at 18:34
24

Type aliases like int, string, object, etc. are built into the language and do not require a using directive to be able to use, unlike DateTime for example.

However, if it helps you to think about it, you can consider int to be short for global::System.Int32.

class Program
{
    static void Main() {
         int x = 0;
    }
}

Translates to

class Program
{
    static void Main() {
         global::System.Int32 x = 0;
    }
}

In fact, because the type aliases are keywords, you can't even re-define them as you might expect:

public class int { } // Compiler error: Identifier expected; 'int' is a keyword

If for some reason you wanted to do this, you'd have to escape the identifier like this:

public class @int { }

int x = 0;             // equivalent to global::System.Int32
@int y = new @int();   // equivalent to global::MyNamespace.@int
4
  • I think it is quite accurate to consider int a shorthand for global::System.Int32. Creating a type @int is irrelevant. But you can write namespace System { public struct Int32 { } } in your program. After that the int pre-defined keyword will refer to that struct. You will however get a warning if you still refer mscorlib.dll because that assemply also has a System.Int32. If you wanted to, you could compile without reference to mscorlib.dll, but you would need to hand-write really many "pre-defined" types! – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Sep 15 '13 at 19:44
  • Just tested it, and my memory was not exact, for the System.Int32 of mscorlib.dll is preferred over the System.Int32 in my project. But I can compile without reference to mscorlib.dll as I mentioned, and then I will have to write a hell lot of "pre-defined" types by hand, including the System.Int32. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Sep 15 '13 at 19:56
  • @JeppeStigNielsen Are you saying that you can make int x = 0 compile to something other than ldc.i4.1;stloc.0, or just that you can just make typeof(System.Int32) return a different type than the one defined in mscorlib.dll? – p.s.w.g Sep 15 '13 at 20:26
  • Not quite sure. I am really sure I can make int.Parse(""); call a strange method I write, though. It is clear that a lot of assumptions about what int is are built into the compiler. The struct Int32 itself is not used much, in the IL created. I am sure Hans Passant or someone will have more to say about that. Edit: As I remember it, the struct Int32 contains an instance field of type int. Normally that would be impossible for a struct (an infinite cycle in the struct lay-out). Clearly there's a lot of magic here. – Jeppe Stig Nielsen Sep 15 '13 at 20:39

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