4

Let A be an matrix of size [n,n]. If I want to extract its diagonal, I do diag(A).

Actually, I want the opposite diagonal, which would be [A(n,1),A(n-1,2),A(n-2,3),...].

One way to do this is via diag(flipud(A)). However, flipud(A) is quite wasteful and multiplies the time it takes by a factor of 10 compared to finding the usual diagonal.

I'm looking for a fast way of obtaining the opposite diagonal. Naturally, for loops seem abysmally slow. Suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

2
10

Here is my matrix, produced by A = magic(5)

A =

17    24     1     8    15
23     5     7    14    16
 4     6    13    20    22
10    12    19    21     3
11    18    25     2     9


s = size(A,1)
A(s:s-1:end-1)

ans =
11    12    13    14    15
1
  • 1
    slighly faster version: A(sqrt(end):sqrt(end)-1:end-1) Sep 16 '13 at 11:25
6

Below is a comparison of all the methods mentioned so far, plus a few other variations I could think of. This was tested on 64-bit R2013a using TIMEIT function.

function [t,v] = testAntiDiag()
    % data and functions
    A = magic(5000);
    f = {
        @() func0(A) ;
        @() func1(A) ;
        @() func2(A) ;
        @() func3(A) ;
        @() func4(A) ;
        @() func5(A) ;
        @() func6(A) ;
        @() func7(A) ;
    };

    % timeit and check results
    t = cellfun(@timeit, f, 'UniformOutput',true);
    v = cellfun(@feval, f, 'UniformOutput',false);
    assert( isequal(v{:}) )
end


function d = func0(A)
    d = diag(A(end:-1:1,:));
end

function d = func1(A)
    d = diag(flipud(A));
end

function d = func2(A)
    d = flipud(diag(fliplr(A)));
end

function d = func3(A)
    d = diag(rot90(A,3));
end

function d = func4(A)
    n = size(A,1);
    d = A(n:n-1:end-1).';
end

function d = func5(A)
    n = size(A,1);
    d = A(cumsum(n + [0,repmat(-1,1,n-1)])).';
end

function d = func6(A)
    n = size(A,1);
    d = A(sub2ind([n n], n:-1:1, 1:n)).';
end

function d = func7(A)
    n = size(A,1);
    d = zeros(n,1);
    for i=1:n
        d(i) = A(n-i+1,i);
    end
end

The timings (in the same order they are defined above):

>> testAntiDiag
ans =
   0.078635867152801
   0.077895631970976    % @AlexR.
   0.080368641824528
   0.195832501156751
   0.000074983294297    % @thefourtheye
   0.000143019460665    % @woodchips
   0.000174679680437
   0.000152488508547    % for-loop

The most suprising result to me is the last one. Apparently JIT compilation is very effective on such simple for-loops.

2
  • I updated the results (I didnt have the laptop plugged in, so CPU throttling made it slower!). My conclusion is that they are very similar, perhaps you are optimizing the wrong thing :)
    – Amro
    Sep 16 '13 at 4:31
  • Thanks for the comparisons and for Knuth's advice!
    – Alex R.
    Sep 16 '13 at 15:20
0

The elements you want are easily obtained by indexing. For example, this should do the trick.

n = 4;
A = magic(n)
A =
    16     2     3    13
     5    11    10     8
     9     7     6    12
     4    14    15     1

A(cumsum(n + [0,repmat(-1,1,n-1)]))
ans =
     4     7    10    13

I could also have used sub2ind to get those element indexes, but this does it a bit more cleanly, though less obvious in how it works.

0

A = magic(6)

A =

35     1     6    26    19    24
 3    32     7    21    23    25
31     9     2    22    27    20
 8    28    33    17    10    15
30     5    34    12    14    16
 4    36    29    13    18    11

b = diag(A(1:length(A),length(A):-1:1))

b =

24
23
22
33
 5
 4

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