5

I have a CSV file containing data such as

value;name;test;etc

which I'm trying to split by using strtok(string, ";"). However, this file can contain zero-length data, like this:

value;;test;etc

which strtok() skips. Is there a way I can avoid strtok from skipping zero-length data like this?

  • Is strsep() available on your platform? The usage is very similar to strtok(), but it returns empty fields correctly. – Martin R Sep 16 '13 at 12:18
  • @MartinR probably. I'm using Fedora w/ Linux 3.10.10. – Mauren Sep 16 '13 at 12:32
  • 1
    So that could be an alternative. But even that would not handle delimiters inside quoted text like aaa;bbb;"ddd;eee";fff correctly. – Martin R Sep 16 '13 at 12:38
  • @MartinR fortunately I don't need this functionality right now. I'm gonna try using strsep(). – Mauren Sep 16 '13 at 12:40
5

A possible alternative is to use the BSD function strsep() instead of strtok(), if available. From the man page:

The strsep() function is intended as a replacement for the strtok() function. While the strtok() function should be preferred for portability reasons (it conforms to ISO/IEC 9899:1990 ("ISO C90")) it is unable to handle empty fields, i.e., detect fields delimited by two adjacent delimiter characters, or to be used for more than a single string at a time. The strsep() function first appeared in 4.4BSD.

A simple example (also copied from that man page):

char *token, *string, *tofree;

tofree = string = strdup("value;;test;etc");
while ((token = strsep(&string, ";")) != NULL)
    printf("token=%s\n", token);

free(tofree);

Output:

token=value
token=
token=test
token=etc

so empty fields are handled correctly.

Of course, as others already said, none of these simple tokenizer functions handles delimiter inside quotation marks correctly, so if that is an issue, you should use a proper CSV parsing library.

  • Worked like a charm. Thank you very much! – Mauren Sep 17 '13 at 18:18
4

There is no way to make strtok() not behave this way. From man page:

A sequence of two or more contiguous delimiter bytes in the parsed string is considered to be a single delimiter. Delimiter bytes at the start or end of the string are ignored. Put another way: the tokens returned by strtok() are always nonempty strings.

But what you can do is check the amount of '\0' characters before the token, since strtok() replaces all encountered tokens with '\0'. That way you'll know how many tokens were skipped. Source info:

This end of the token is automatically replaced by a null-character, and the beginning of the token is returned by the function.

And a code sample to show what I mean.

char* aStr = ...;
char* ptr = NULL;

ptr = strtok (...);

char* back = ptr;
int count = -1;
do {
  back--;
  if (back <= aStr) break; // to protect against reads before aStr
  count++;
} while (*back = '\0');

(written without ide or testing, may be an invalid implementation, but the idea stands).

  • Sounds fair. I'm gonna try this approach. – Mauren Sep 16 '13 at 12:14
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    I will be grateful for comments about downvotes, I'd like to correct this implementation if there's something wrong with it. – Dariusz Sep 16 '13 at 12:14
2

No you can't. From "man strtok":

A sequence of two or more contiguous delimiter characters in the parsed string is considered to be a single delimiter. Delimiter characters at the start or end of the string are ignored. Put another way: the tokens returned by strtok() are always nonempty strings.

You could also run into problems if your data contains the delimiter inside quotes or any other "escape".

I think the best solution is to get a CSV parsing library or write your own parsing function.

  • Writing my own parsing function was something I was trying to avoid so far. – Mauren Sep 16 '13 at 12:15
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    Well, avoiding that is actually a good idea. There is this library, which is recommended in another StackOverflow thread: sourceforge.net/projects/libcsv – Benjamin Maurer Sep 16 '13 at 12:20

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