10

I have a array which have list of item like this

arr = [
  {:id=>1,  :title=>"A",      :parent_id=>nil}, 
  {:id=>2,  :title=>"B",      :parent_id=>nil},
  {:id=>3,  :title=>"A1",     :parent_id=>1}, 
  {:id=>4,  :title=>"A2",     :parent_id=>1},
  {:id=>5,  :title=>"A11",    :parent_id=>3}, 
  {:id=>6,  :title=>"12",     :parent_id=>3},
  {:id=>7,  :title=>"A2=121", :parent_id=>6}, 
  {:id=>8,  :title=>"A21",    :parent_id=>4},
  {:id=>9,  :title=>"B11",    :parent_id=>2}, 
  {:id=>10, :title=>"B12",    :parent_id=>2},
   ...
]

If parent_id is nil then its should be the parent node, if parent_id is not nil then it should comes under the particular parent.

Based on id and parent_id, I want to provide a response like this:

-A
  -A1
    -A11
    -A12
      -A123
  -A2
    -A21
-B
  -B1
    -B11
    -B12

How could I generate a responds mentioned above?

Thanks

7

3 Answers 3

8

You could use a gem like Closure_tree:

hash_tree provides a method for rendering a subtree as an ordered nested hash:

Tag.hash_tree
#=> {a => {b => {c1 => {d1 => {}}, c2 => {d2 => {}}}, b2 => {}}}

Or Ancestry:

Ancestry can arrange an entire subtree into nested hashes for easy navigation after retrieval from the database. TreeNode.arrange could for example return:

{ #<TreeNode id: 100018, name: "Stinky", ancestry: nil>
  => { #<TreeNode id: 100019, name: "Crunchy", ancestry: "100018">
    => { #<TreeNode id: 100020, name: "Squeeky", ancestry: "100018/100019">
      => {}
    }
  }
}

See https://www.ruby-toolbox.com/categories/Active_Record_Nesting for other gems.

Update

If you have to do it in-memory, something like this should work:

nested_hash = Hash[arr.map{|e| [e[:id], e.merge(children: [])]}]
nested_hash.each do |id, item|
  parent = nested_hash[item[:parent_id]]
  parent[:children] << item if parent
end
tree = nested_hash.select { |id, item| item[:parent_id].nil? }.values

require 'pp'
pp tree

Output

[{:id=>1,
  :title=>"A",
  :parent_id=>nil,
  :children=>
   [{:id=>3,
     :title=>"A1",
     :parent_id=>1,
     :children=>
      [{:id=>5, :title=>"A11", :parent_id=>3, :children=>[]},
       {:id=>6,
        :title=>"12",
        :parent_id=>3,
        :children=>
         [{:id=>7, :title=>"A2=121", :parent_id=>6, :children=>[]}]}]},
    {:id=>4,
     :title=>"A2",
     :parent_id=>1,
     :children=>[{:id=>8, :title=>"A21", :parent_id=>4, :children=>[]}]}]},
 {:id=>2,
  :title=>"B",
  :parent_id=>nil,
  :children=>
   [{:id=>9, :title=>"B11", :parent_id=>2, :children=>[]},
    {:id=>10, :title=>"B12", :parent_id=>2, :children=>[]}]}]
1
  • both gems are really awesome, can we make it without any database migrations? Sep 16, 2013 at 13:58
5

One example:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby

root = {:id => 0, :title => '', :parent_id => nil}

arr = arr = [
  {:id=>1,  :title=>"A",      :parent_id=>nil}, 
  {:id=>2,  :title=>"B",      :parent_id=>nil},
  {:id=>3,  :title=>"A1",     :parent_id=>1}, 
  {:id=>4,  :title=>"A2",     :parent_id=>1},
  {:id=>5,  :title=>"A11",    :parent_id=>3}, 
  {:id=>6,  :title=>"12",     :parent_id=>3},
  {:id=>7,  :title=>"A2=121", :parent_id=>6}, 
  {:id=>8,  :title=>"A21",    :parent_id=>4},
  {:id=>9,  :title=>"B11",    :parent_id=>2}, 
  {:id=>10, :title=>"B12",    :parent_id=>2},
]

map = {}

arr.each do |e|
  map[e[:id]] = e
end

@@tree = {}

arr.each do |e|
  pid = e[:parent_id]
  if pid == nil || !map.has_key?(pid)
    (@@tree[root] ||= []) << e
  else
    (@@tree[map[pid]] ||= []) << e
  end
end

def print_tree(item, level)
  items = @@tree[item]
  unless items == nil
    indent = level > 0 ? sprintf("%#{level * 2}s", " ") : ""
    items.each do |e|
      puts "#{indent}-#{e[:title]}"
      print_tree(e, level + 1)
    end
  end
end

print_tree(root, 0)

Output:

-A
  -A1
    -A11
    -12
      -A2=121
  -A2
    -A21
-B
  -B11
  -B12
5

Don't mean to replace proven gems, but depending on your needs you can use something as simple as:

groups = arr.group_by{ |x| x[:parent_id] }
groups.default = []

build_tree = 
  lambda do |parent| 
    [parent[:title], groups[parent[:id]].map(&build_tree)]
    # or
    # { parent[:title] => groups[parent[:id]].map(&build_tree) }
  end

p build_tree[:id => nil][1] # :id => nil is not required, empty hash will work too
# => [["A", [["A1", [["A11", []], ["A12", [["A122", []]]]]], ["A2", [["A21", []]]]]], ["B", [["B11", []], ["B12", []]]]]
1
  • thanks for your time, its complicated for me to understand the concept behind build_tree. Sep 17, 2013 at 12:13

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.